1996 Underbody corrosion

Discussion in 'Body and Interior: Repairs and Modifications' started by windrider1200, Dec 20, 2013.

  1. windrider1200

    windrider1200 Member

    The 96 CE I recently picked up has what appears to be white corrosion dots in various areas on the underbody. The Previous Owner spent alot of time deep sea fishing, so I suspect the car sat in the marina parking lot and picked up some salt there. I've grudgedly ran the car through a car wash and had the underbody flushed,but most of the dots remain.

    I've hit an area witha scrubbing sponge, to som elimited success, but can I use the phosphate based rust converters to convert / seal the areas to any further corrosion?

    My main concern is the metal lines with the spiral wire armour around them.

    Thanks
     
  2. philly

    philly solid fixture here in the forum

    for rust inhibitors to work properly youre gonna need to use steel wool, sandpaper, wire brush or a combination of the three to remove any surface rust you find before application. p.o.r. 15 is probably the greatest stuff ever

    http://www.eastwood.com/por-15-semi-gloss-black.html

    and it comes in alot of colors. one word of advice, wear gloves because if it dries on your skin, diesel fuel wont get it off. its that strong.

    but if you intend on painting over the surface with perhaps some undercoating spray or some hi temp paint for exhaust parts that may have flush rust i find this to be the least intrusive, easiest to paint on product:

    http://www.pepboys.com/product/details/ ... quantity=1

    same same you must scrape off whatever you dont like looking at and then apply this stuff... used to leave a black paintable surface but i have had some bottles leave a red primer colored surface...
     
  3. grumpyvette

    grumpyvette Administrator Staff Member

    the first thing most guys want to do is pressure wash the car with hot soapy water to dissolve and flush and salt or dirt deposits on the cars frame or suspension,off the car so the tendency to rust is reduced. followed by a good solvent wipe down or if its required a good wire brush or sand blast cleaning, and detailed inspection to understand exactly what your dealing with!
    once your down to clean metal you can accurately access the repairs needed and parts that might need to be replaced,
    once that's been done there's several chemical rust blocking paint on surface paints or rust preventative surface preparations that can be used to stop or at least significantly reduce rust damage, the key in most cases is doing the detailed surface cleaning and not applying anything to the surface until its clean and dry and not leaving trapped pockets of moisture.

    having access to a good lift and a portable pressure washer helps here a great deal.


    [​IMG]
    http://www.homedepot.com/Outdoors-Outdo ... -100615527

    https://www.wash-safe.com/wash_safe...exterior-cleaning-solutions/rust-off/rust-off

    http://corrosion-doctors.org/Car/car-electronic-protection.htm

    http://www.eastwood.com/paints/rust-solutions/removal.html?SRCCODE=MN110040

    http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...me-1957-pontiac-rear-dana-60.9753/#post-37060

    viewtopic.php?f=51&t=2300&p=30653&hilit=electrolysis+rust#p30653

    viewtopic.php?f=44&t=1844&p=4823&hilit=rust+removal#p4823

    viewtopic.php?f=61&t=5003&p=25222&hilit=rust+remove#p25222

    viewtopic.php?f=50&t=6328&p=19879&hilit=rust+removal#p19879

    viewtopic.php?f=50&t=3224&p=8580&hilit=+rust+acid#p8580

    http://www.eastwood.com/paints/rust-sol ... tment.html

    http://www.bapspaint.com/docs/psheets/P ... /P-226.pdf

    does this help

    instructions FOUND ONLINE

    1

    Scrub the frame with steel wool to remove any loose rust.
    2

    Pour a generous amount of rust remover onto the frame of the object. Wait several minutes, check manufacturer's instructions to see how long they recommend, and then scrub with a scrubbing pad.


    3

    Sand the frame down with sandpaper to remove any additional rust and to smooth out the frame. Now that you removed the existing rust from the frame, you must stop it from reoccurring.
    4

    Remove any parts of the frame that are removable. For instance, you are removing the rust from a bike frame then take apart the bike. Remove any brackets or joints that are holding the frame together.
    5

    Apply lubricant to every joint, bracket or other area that tends to collect rust. Spray down into joints and pipes where the frame connect. Allow time to dry.
    6

    Repair the frame. Put the parts back together of your once rusted frame.
    7

    Sand down any nicks or chips in your paint. The exposed area from the paint chip is a prime area for rust to occur. Use touch up paint to cover the chipped area on your frame. Allow time to dry.
    8

    Place your frame in an area that is safe from the elements. Water exposure can cause it to begin to rust again.
    9

    Reapply lubricant and check for rust frequently on the frame. Proper maintenance will prevent the frame from rusting again.


    Read more: http://www.ehow.com/how_7146087_stop-fr ... z2o1nk0hjS
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 7, 2016
  4. windrider1200

    windrider1200 Member

    I'm going to try & take a few pics and post them, I tried last night, but the entire bottom of the car was dripping water. The temp went to low 70's with about 90% humidity, and the car was at around 50-ish so condensation was rampant. Tonight may be better. Except for maybe 2-3 small spots that were actually red/brown surface rust, the remainder is this white powder spots on the surface. When I hit an area with a dry scrubbing sponge, it kicked up a bit of this white powder.

    I have used POR-15 on the '72 frame with excellant result, but that wasafter removing some significant surface rust with minor surface pitting. Which is not what I'm seeing on the '96. If I get some decent weqather, I'll pull out the pressure washer and have a go at underneath with the hot water and simple green. Thaks for the suggestions.
     

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