Budget car lift

Discussion in 'shop/garage Electrical related' started by DorianL, Jan 16, 2017.

  1. DorianL

    DorianL solid fixture here in the forum Staff Member

    A regular lift in my driveway would never get approval from my executive oversight committee, aka wife.

    Is there a way to build on a budget and in-ground lift? Preferably something that could be entirely covered ?
     
  2. Grumpy

    Grumpy The Grumpy Grease Monkey Staff Member

    that I would think depends on your zoning laws, water level, drainage and bank balance, and of course what you realistically want to have when your done.
    I think many guys purchase something like a kwick lift
    but youll need to purchase one used as I think the companys out of business.
    I got by with 4 12 ton jack stands and two 3 ton floor jacks for a couple decades

    http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/a-car-lift-in-your-shop.98/

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    these are rather popular with guys that have limited ceiling height,
    if you have just a bit of level concrete floor space,
    some guys pour a recessed concrete base pad so the lifts sit flush with the floor when not in use

    http://www.garagejournal.com/forum/showthread.php?t=35433
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    you can even combine the lower rise lift with a pit for better access, and have a strong replaceable cover when the pits not in use!
    [​IMG]


    http://www.challengerlifts.com/SRM10_fb.shtml

    https://www.eagleequip.com/product/PMR-6000-48.html?gclid=CO2iyLb0xtECFYlWDQodU5IBfg

    http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_375659_375659?cm_mmc=Google-pla&utm_source=Google_PLA&utm_medium=Automotive > Automotive Lifts&utm_campaign=BendPak&utm_content=144662&gclid=CJfSqeD0xtECFR1LDQodmxkHbA
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2017
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  3. NOT A TA

    NOT A TA reliable source of info

  4. Strictly Attitude

    Strictly Attitude solid fixture here in the forum

  5. NOT A TA

    NOT A TA reliable source of info

    Ya, I just thought it'd get him looking at the possibility of an in ground camouflaged set up. Grumpy edited his post adding pics of more suitable examples after I'd posted.
     
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  6. Loves302Chevy

    Loves302Chevy "One test is worth a thousand expert opinions."

    I don't know about where you are, but pits are illegal around here (CT).
    A neighbor of mine and his friend built his garage with a pit in it, really similar to what Grumpy posted, but without the lifts.
    They then covered it over and poured 2" of concrete on top. Then had it inspected and passed. Then the sledgehammers came out.
    Still there to this day.
     
  7. NOT A TA

    NOT A TA reliable source of info

    I lived in Shelton, Ansonia, and Oxford CT most 0of my life and there were quite a few pits in garages. Never heard anything about them being against current code although I don't know of anyone who tried to get one through building inspection.
     
  8. Loves302Chevy

    Loves302Chevy "One test is worth a thousand expert opinions."

    It's that lack of oxygen thing.
     
  9. Loves302Chevy

    Loves302Chevy "One test is worth a thousand expert opinions."

  10. busterrm

    busterrm solid fixture here in the forum

    I thought stands for under the tires out 3/16 or 1/4 thick steel could work nicely! Say 18 inches up, what do think Grumpy?
     
  11. DorianL

    DorianL solid fixture here in the forum Staff Member

    Now yer just trying to scare me :p

    Hm, but the point about checking if a permit is required is well taken.
     
  12. DorianL

    DorianL solid fixture here in the forum Staff Member

    I like the lower rise with a pit solution... just worried about water infiltration.
     
  13. Grumpy

    Grumpy The Grumpy Grease Monkey Staff Member

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    most of my friends have purchased 4-to0-6 of the HF 12 ton rated jack stands simply because when matched to a decent quality floor jack they provide one of the safest and least expensive options to get your car up to about 20"-24" off the concrete floor of the shop to provide the room required to use a mechanics creeper and a decent transmission jack


    IF your budget is really tight you can salvage scrap 2" x 4" and cut them to about 15.5" lengths and stack & glue & screw them together to custom build a decent car support like pictured below


    [​IMG]
    you will need a decent quality floor jack but its a combo that can be ACQUIRED FOR UNDER $200--$400

    http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/under-car-safety.26/page-3#post-64755

    I used the floor jack and 12 ton harbor freight jack stand route for over 30 years , because my first home shop had no room for a lift and I was saving to build a decent size shop when I retired

    http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...garage-plans-some-build-info-experiances.116/

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    Last edited: Jan 20, 2017
  14. NOT A TA

    NOT A TA reliable source of info

    I do the wheel crib thing a lot. Can't have a traditional 2-4 post lift in the 2 car garage I use as a shop because it would be in the way when doing paint jobs. I can raise cars high enough to easily work under the car doing most any type of work. I've also got some 22 ton jack stands if there's a task that needs doing where wheels need to be removed. The trick to using cribs up high is to have platforms to put a floor jack on as you start getting higher and higher and only raise each end of the car one crib section at a time.

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  15. Loves302Chevy

    Loves302Chevy "One test is worth a thousand expert opinions."

    I'm not trying to be a wise-ass, but I have to ask, how did that work out for you?
    Have you worked on a sufficient enough amount of vehicles to make the new shop worth it?
    We plan things like this while we are younger, and even if we do accomplish that goal, we find that now we are too old or our health isn't what it used to be, or don't even give a crap about it anymore.
    The reason I ask is because that is also one of my goals. But by the time I make it happen, it might be too late.
     
  16. Grumpy

    Grumpy The Grumpy Grease Monkey Staff Member

    While I'm sure 99% of the people reading this won,t really understand,
    I really enjoy taking my time to carefully check, assemble , clearance, and do everything correctly!

    I tend to feel bad if I know an engines needs some precision work or some clearances checked, and the person who I,m building it for,
    wants to skip the step or ignore doing it correctly.
    very few people seem to know whats involved in correctly assembling an engine and even fewer are willing to take the time and effort to do it correctly or are willing to pay some one else to do so.
    I used to do engine builds, as a semi serious side business when I was younger , and while I always have had, and still do have a long line of local guys wanting to have me work on their cars its never been more than a serious hobby,that I've constantly tried to be exceptionally good at! and while, I rarely do more than break even on cost because I rarely charge more than the parts and supplies cost
    (again, I view this as a HOBBY and do things correctly at my pace.)
    I almost NEVER work on an engine without the owner hands-on locally simply because theres always a hundred small decisions to be made, as to what needs to be done in machine work and parts selection, and the costs add up rapidly and its always been far easier to point out why I think certain things need to be addressed , and have the local guy pay for the parts and machine work, himself that way he realizes I'M not making squat on the deal, even thought its costing him an arm & a leg in his opinion.and I found out decades ago most people don,t care to spend the time and effort and cash required .

    I freely admit I've never been all that concerned with making a profit , I have done a great many car and engine builds ,
    but rarely have I made any profits while doing them, and when I did the cash instantly went for better precision tools or new tools, or
    THE SHOP SUPPLIES!
    THE SHOP I built was never intended to be more or less than a really good place to have the correct precision tools , the required room and lift, etc.
    to build engines at my pace, and fix cars , and engines for myself or my friends
    I've been building engines for over 50 years, and enjoy doing it correctly at my own pace, some guys collect stamps or butter-flys, some are skilled and use talent to build objects that require experience and knowledge like Stradivarius violins,
    ,some guys drink or smoke dope, for me, personally I feel best taking the time and effort to carefully assemble and tune engine's, is rewarding and relaxing.
    or teaching someone local , hands on, why and how things are done correctly and having the correct tools on hand to do that!
    yes I'm older and slower , but I'm also much more knowledgeable, much more experienced , I have more tools , so doing the work takes less effort and its more enjoyable.... and yeah! at times (RARELY)
    I just say ... screw it!
    I'm skipping what I planed ,today,
    due to a near total lack of.....
    give a flying F%^& if it gets done today!
    but thats RARE as it gets me out of the house,
    and temporarily away from the endless , ever expanding, wifes honey do list!
    so
    HELL YES!
    FOLLOW YOUR DREAM ,
    AND PLAN CAREFULLY AND SAVE!
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2017
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  17. Loves302Chevy

    Loves302Chevy "One test is worth a thousand expert opinions."

    Good answer.:)
     
  18. DorianL

    DorianL solid fixture here in the forum Staff Member

    The more I think about it, the more this seems to make more sense. I like the fact that this could also work for raising with hanging wheels. Placed under the tires, you can get the vehicle quite high up, providing quite reasonable access to the undercarriage.
     
  19. Grumpy

    Grumpy The Grumpy Grease Monkey Staff Member

    The wood car support's shown are very common around here, simply because the cost is very low,
    the assembly is enhanced if you greatly add to the structural rigidity by use of wood glue and a 1/4" ,
    or 3/8" 15.5" x 15.5" layer of plywood near the lower 2 layers and a second near the upper level.
    that helps a good deal in maintaining a much more rigid structure.
    and many guys I know have glued or screwed sections of scrap tire tread on the lower surface to prevent moisture
    absorbsion and making the stack much less likely to move on the concrete
     
  20. NOT A TA

    NOT A TA reliable source of info

    This ^^^ happens a lot. The one who benefits is the younger person with more income who gets the house next. The old guy who built his dream garage hardly gets any use out of it and it becomes storage for projects that never get completed. Would have been better off to use the money spent on the garage/shop to complete projects or build the dream car they always wanted. I looked at a house like this the other day with 2 car attached and 4 car detached but it's waaaay out of my price range at $649,000.00 ahahaha

    I'm not as old as grump but almost 60 now. I really want a bigger shop, but, will I be one of those guys? How many years will I live? Be able to do the work? Desire to do the work? I could sell off some of my cars and build a shop over a couple years. A lot could change during that time. So I keep contemplating and working out of the 2 car garage even though it's not ideal.
     
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  21. Indycars

    Indycars Administrator Staff Member

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