building a concrete slab to work on

Discussion in 'Shop Plans, and some larger shop tool related inf' started by grumpyvette, Jun 24, 2011.

  1. 87vette81big

    87vette81big Guest

    No.
    They got me booted off of Digital Corvette for daying Pontiac and Hellcats the group that hates me. They PM each.other and in bed with the Mods there.
    DC only good for Newsroom. Zero Drag Race action which I hate.
    Its rhe End Of Times Ralph.
    GET YOUR PROJECTS DONE IN 2016.
    LAST CHANCE TO.
     
  2. Loves302Chevy

    Loves302Chevy "One test is worth a thousand expert opinions."

    Damn, you and I think alike. Each slab is a monolithic pour. The 100 foot wall has a concrete footing.
    9 ft high in back of the shed. About 900 blocks took me 8 years to lay. Each is pinned and glued. About
    200 tons of stone behind the wall for drainage. Slotted drain pipe at base going out to the street and
    another pipe closer to the surface. All slabs are overbuilt. 6" of concrete with 12" stone underneath.
    Reinforcing wire and re-bar tying everything together where possible. The hill used to end right behind
    the garage. It's all ledge underneath. 2 years of jack hammering before I had to call in the big equipment.
    All digging for slabs around the garage done by myself with a shovel.
    The 1 car garage will be coming down hopefully soon and will become a 2 car with a workshop at the rear.
    When that happens, the entire slab except for 42" from the wall, will be over-poured with another 2 inches
    of concrete, but I have to find out about incorporating at least a 2 foot wall at the edges because I don't want
    the grass right at the bottom like it is now. This year I plan to have the digging done and stone placed for
    extending the driveway in front of the slab and running a drain pipe to the street.
    0091.jpg 0081.jpg 0079.jpg 0088.jpg 0062.jpg 0061.jpg 0055.jpg 0040.jpg 0035.jpg 0029.jpg
     
  3. Loves302Chevy

    Loves302Chevy "One test is worth a thousand expert opinions."

    More pics.
    0023.jpg 0005.jpg 0070.jpg 0173.jpg 0169.jpg 0164.jpg 0162.jpg 0159.jpg 0156.jpg 5869.jpg
     
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2016
  4. Loves302Chevy

    Loves302Chevy "One test is worth a thousand expert opinions."

    1 more set.
    0007.jpg 0010.jpg 5868.jpg 5867.jpg 5878.jpg 5875.jpg 5874.jpg 5872.jpg 0053.jpg 0051.jpg
     
  5. Grumpy

    Grumpy The Grumpy Grease Monkey mechanical engineer. Staff Member

    wow, great detailed pictures
    http://www.schlosserconcrete.com/Concrete-Calculator.html

    BTW heres three calculators (Id add 10% )
    http://www.concretenetwork.com/concrete/howmuch/calculator.htm

    http://www.lowes.com/cd_Concrete+Pad+Calculator_100901113_

    http://www.schlosserconcrete.com/Concrete-Calculator.html

    take the time and effort too read through these links it can save you thousands of dollars
    https://catalanoconcrete.com/concrete-101/concrete-basics

    https://www.wikihow.com/Choose-Concrete-for-a-Project

    http://www.constructionknowledge.net/concrete/concrete_basics.php


    remember the footers surrounding the concrete floor slab will be about 2 ft deep x 2 feet wide
    and the slab will need to be about 8 inches thick where the lift is mounted
    youll need a certain amount of rebar in the footers and slab
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    (BTW the number is the number of 1/8" in diameter the rebar measures)
    so a number 5 rebar is 5/8 diameter
    if a building code calls for lets say #5 size rebar you can and probably should tell your builder to step up the size at least one or possibly two larger steps
    (thats what I did, it only added a couple hundred dollars to the cost of the shops construction but significantly increased the slab rigidity potential.
    and concrete quality varys if you don't specify the strength you get the minimum, which is generally the 3000 psi version, you can upgrade to the 4500 psi version for only about $15 a cubic yard (again what I did)

    [​IMG]
    verify local building codes
    and remember the slab and footers will need to be elevated above the surrounding areas height,
    for decent drainage (usually 3-4 ft.) minimum
    and the area sloped out at a minimum 5:1 ratio,
     
    Last edited: Nov 20, 2017
  6. 87vette81big

    87vette81big Guest

    Be nice when the garage walls go up Loves 302.
    Good days ahead.
     
  7. chromebumpers

    chromebumpers solid fixture here in the forum Staff Member

    Please don't take this the wrong way but why is this project so over the top? It's great looking, clean work. Looks like you could be building on the perma-frost in Alaska LOL! Are you a masonry contractor?
     
  8. Loves302Chevy

    Loves302Chevy "One test is worth a thousand expert opinions."

    No - Postal Worker.
    In a word - PERFECTIONIST. I can't help it.
     
  9. Indycars

    Indycars Administrator Staff Member

    Very impressive to say the least !
     
  10. Grumpy

    Grumpy The Grumpy Grease Monkey mechanical engineer. Staff Member

    Im always rather amazed , at how contractors just assume that most people are totally clueless and will blindly accept any estimate they get shoved under their nose to sign.
    one of my sons needed a 20 ft wide and 40 ft long section of concrete about 6" thick and a 30 ft long section of 24" culvert for drainage in his drive way
    he was quoted $7K by the first contractor
    now 20 x 40=800 sq feet, or 89 sq yards, 44.5 sq yards 1 foot thick , or roughly 16 cubic yards of concrete, the current cost of concrete is well under $150 a cubic yard
    now lets assume he needed 20 cubic yards with the footer deep er edges, 20 x $150-$3000, the culvert costs under $500 for a 20 ft section, lets say he requires two sections
    so were still up to $4000, throw in $400 in rebar, and that leaves $2600 labor.. figure two days max thats still over $120 an hour
    I told him to get at least three more estimates
    yeah there will likey be two guys but all those prices are estimates on the higher end of what ID expect too see.
    Id bet the job gets done correctly for under $5000, maybe a lot under
     
  11. Strictly Attitude

    Strictly Attitude solid fixture here in the forum

    Ok this is underground is the contractor needing a machine on site to dig? Is the Colvert dug out yet. Crusher run and compaction also. Just a few things you forgot.
     
  12. Grumpy

    Grumpy The Grumpy Grease Monkey mechanical engineer. Staff Member

    the ditch for the culvert exists, and is in the correct location and at the acceptable depth
    I wish I was closer , I have a tractor and I installed the culvert to building code specs in my driveway,
    and graded the drive way, here in florida, now I have a gravel driveway,
    but being very familiar with building a slab, having done three now,
    I still think hes being quoted on the high end,obviously I'm not there,
    and don,t have all the facts ,but looking at the pictures he sent ,
    and having looked over the diagram's and permits he pulled,
    it seems rather less complicated.
     
  13. Strictly Attitude

    Strictly Attitude solid fixture here in the forum

    $2000 to pay 4 guys 2 days of labor at $30 an hour, setting forms, crusher run delivered compacted rebar set. Pouring next day trowel for drainage need concrete slump correct or will level. Clean tools and wheel barrel. Brush finish concrete then cover to keep moisture in wet burlap depending the temps usually not done but can weaken concrete significantly as I am sure you remember from materials being an engineer. My DOT experiance coming out required for most of our jobs. Come remove all forms next day clean forms for next job 6" may also need make wood forms. And don't forget form release also. Not complicated but this is from my experience doing it for a living for over 3 yrs. I am not saying high priced or low but contractors are making bank cause lack of working trades men out there.
     
  14. Strictly Attitude

    Strictly Attitude solid fixture here in the forum

    I rounded the 4 guys 2 days work 3 not full days of work averaged to 2 and 30 being average labor including contractor to be fair.
     
  15. Grumpy

    Grumpy The Grumpy Grease Monkey mechanical engineer. Staff Member

    I don,t think I will have much realistic input as Im many hundreds of miles distant
    but I think that first $7K quote was vastly excessive, and mostly based on the fact ,the contractor,
    figures if you accept the bid you have more cash than brains and he makes good money,
    if you don,t accept... he looses nothing or can come back with a more reasonable offer
     
    Strictly Attitude likes this.
  16. Strictly Attitude

    Strictly Attitude solid fixture here in the forum

    You are probably right heating and ac is even worst
     
  17. Strictly Attitude

    Strictly Attitude solid fixture here in the forum

    I also feel if you were there that you could avoid using the contractor all together even if just guiding your son through the job.
     
  18. Maniacmechanic1

    Maniacmechanic1 solid fixture here in the forum

    I think Grumpy is talking about his Son that Moved to Texas.
     

Share This Page