engine assembly tips

Discussion in 'Rotating Assemblies' started by grumpyvette, Dec 16, 2010.

  1. grumpyvette

    grumpyvette Administrator Staff Member



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    the first few rule's of GRUMPY'S engine assembly


    (1) THINK THINGS THROUGH CAREFULLY ,
    WRITE DOWN A LIST OF COMPONENTS ,
    MAKE DARN SURE THE LIST IS COMPATIBLE WITH,
    and AT LEAST SEMI-REASONABLY PRICED WITHIN YOUR BUDGET.
    FOR WHAT YOU INTEND TO BUILD AND RESEARCH THE RELATED MACHINE WORK,
    RESEARCH CAREFULLY THE COMPONENT INSTALLATION AND INTENDED USE ,
    AND POWER BAND THE PARTS WILL REQUIRE
    AND FIND AN EXPERIENCED MENTOR.

    (2) if in doubt, about how to do anything, on an engine, do some detailed research,
    find and compare at least 3-5 valid trust worthy sources info,
    read the instructions over again, several time's very carefully
    and if available watch several related videos.

    (3) if any component will not easily function as designed or requires a good bit of physical force to install ,
    or your not 100% sure your doing something CORRECTLY
    STOP, FIND OUT EXACTLY HOW THE PARTS SUPPOSED TO FIT AND FUNCTION,& WHY! YOUR HAVING PROBLEMS
    theres a reason, and you better verify your clearances are correct , and your following the instructions before you proceed.

    (4) never assume the parts you purchased can be used without carefully , cleaning them prior too,
    checking the physical condition, verifying clearances and using the correct sealant, lubricants etc.


    (5) the quality of a component is generally at least loosely related to the cost to produce it,
    and the amount of detailed research and quality machine work that went into its production.
    if you got a significant reduced price, theres typically a reason.
    it might simply be because a new improved part superseded the one you purchased,
    but it might be a far lower quality imported clone with lower quality materials and machine work.
    its the purchasers responsibility to research quality.

    (6) if you did not do the work personally or at least take the effort to verify it was done correctly and personally verify clearances
    ITS almost a sure thing that it was NOT done , correctly, and yes that mandates you fully understand what your looking at,
    and how the components are supposed to function and have high quality precision measuring tools.

    (7) ITS ALMOST ALWAYS FASTER AND LESS EXPENSIVE , AND PRODUCES BETTER RESULTS IF YOU,
    BUY FEWER HIGH QUALITY PARTS & DO THINGS CORRECTLY THE FIRST TIME

    start by buying these books and watching the video


    http://www.themotorbookstore.com/resmchstvi.html

    HOW TO BUILD MAX PERFORMANCE CHEVY SMALL BLOCKS ON A BUDGET by DAVID VIZARD
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    JOHN LINGENFELTER on modifying small-block chevy engines
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    http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...ng-piston-pin-height-compression-height.5064/

    http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...n-wrist-pins-one-really-over-looked-part.978/

    http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/maximizing-piston-to-bore-ring-seal.3897/


    if you find the rotating assembly is more difficult to rotate than you expected, you may want to verify some clearance issues that get over looked at times,
    theres also some, other potential issues,
    theres a slight potential for the piston wrist pins too not rotate effortlessly in the piston pin bores ,

    that may add to the difficulty in rotating the assembly in the block.
    the piston rings must have vertical and back clearance in the piston ring grooves

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    Piston Ring Groove Clearance
    Pistons are grooved to fit rings that seal the cylinder’s compression and allow for lubrication of the cylinder walls. Piston rings come in a set. There are two compression rings. The top ring is affected by the most cylinder compression pressures. The second compression ring reinforces the top ring. The third ring down is the oil ring. It controls lubrication between the piston and cylinder bore.

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    Place the new ring into the top piston groove, and then place a feeler gauge into the gap between the new ring and the upper land. Move around the pistons groove and obtain a few measurements. Compare this reading to specifications. If this reading is too much and the gap is too large, the piston must be replaced. The top ring takes the most compression. This causes the ring to slap against and wear the lands in the piston groove.
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    and of course the pistons must have the correct piston too bore clearance. and connecting rod can only be installed facing one direction
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    READ THRU THESE LINKS, AND SUB LINKED INFO.....yes it will take some time, but it will save your thousands of dollars and weeks of work and give you a good basic back ground knowledge

    http://www.rpmrons.com/Rebuild.html

    http://www.chevyhiperformance.com/tech/ ... index.html

    http://www.racingheadservice.com/Inform ... 1160755224

    viewtopic.php?f=50&t=46&p=55&hilit=+software+books#p55

    viewtopic.php?f=53&t=509

    http://www.hotrod.com/techarticles/hrdp ... ting_rods/

    http://www.speedomotive.com/t-faq.aspx

    http://www.mre-books.com/sa21/sa21_10.html

    viewtopic.php?f=44&t=38&p=46&hilit=+books+video#p46

    viewtopic.php?f=53&t=8310&p=28891&hilit=+books+video#p28891

    viewtopic.php?f=52&t=5078&p=14433&hilit=+books+video#p14433

    viewtopic.php?f=44&t=775&p=8401&hilit=+books+video#p8401

    viewtopic.php?f=87&t=1162&p=2379&hilit=+books+video#p2379

    http://airflowresearch.com/articles/article072/A-P1.htm

    http://airflowresearch.com/articles/article096/A-P1.htm
    Engine Bearing Installation and Fitting Tips

    When measuring bearing measurements, they should always be taken at 90-degrees to the parting line to determine the minimum clearance. If measuring the bearing wall thickness, use a special micrometer with a ball anvil to fit the curvature of the bearing ID. The best way to determine bearing clearance is to measure the bearing ID with the bearings installed in the housing and the bolts torqued to the specified assembly torque. Use a dial bore gauge to measure the bearing ID at 90-degrees to the parting line, then subtract shaft size from bearing ID to determine the clearance. If the dial bore gauge is zeroed at the actual diameter of the crankshaft journal to be installed, the dial bore gauge will then read clearance directly and the subtraction calculation can be eliminated. About .001" clearance per inch of shaft diameter is a good rule of thumb. Increasing that by about .0005" will add a little margin of safety when starting out, especially for rods. Example: .001" X 2.100 = .0021" then add .0005", so starting out set clearance at .0026" for a 2.100 shaft.

    If clearance adjustments need to be made, use either an extra clearance part for more clearance or an undersize part for less clearance. It is permissible to mix sizes if less than .001" adjustment in clearance is desired. When mixing sizes for a select fitting: a) never mix parts having more than .0005" difference in wall size; b) and always install the thickest wall shell in the upper position if installing a rod bearing or the lower position if installing a main bearing. When working with a reground shaft, always measure assembled bearing ID's first. Next have a shaft sized to produce the desired clearance since there are no extra clearance parts available for undersize shafts.

    When measuring a bearing ID or wall thickness, avoid measuring at the parting line. The diagram illustrates there is a parting line relief machined into nearly all bearing shells. This relief is to allow for any mis-match between upper and lower shells due to tolerance differences, or possibly resulting from cap shift or twist during assembly. To determine bearing wall eccentricity or assembled bearing ID ovality, measure at a point at least 3/8" away from the parting line.
    MORE USEFUL INFO
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    BE 100% SURE that the oil pump bolt or STUD doesn,t protrude past the inner main cap surface , because if it bears on the rear main bearing shell it will almost always result in a quickly failed rear bearing
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    failure to use the correct stud, bolt or nut or check clearances when mounting an oil pump can cause problems
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    ONE RATHER COMMON MISTAKE IS USING THE WRONG OIL PUMP STUD OR BOLT TO MOUNT THE OIL PUMP AS IF EITHER EXTENDS THRU THE REAR MAIN CAP IT CAN AND WILL BIND ON THE BEARING AND LOCK OR RESTRICT, SMOOTH ROTATION
    When installing any bearing DO NOT ATTEMPT TO POLISH THE BEARING RUNNING SURFACE WITH ANY TYPE OF ABRASIVE PAD OR PAPER. Bearing overlay layers are extremely soft and thin – typically .0005" on high performance parts. These thin layers can easily be damaged or removed by an abrasive media. Because the overlay layer is electroplated, it may exhibit microscopic plating nodules that make it feel slightly rough. The nodules are the same material as the rest of the plated layer and will quickly be flattened by the shaft. Bearing surfaces can be lightly burnished with solvent and a paper towel if desired.

    Arriving at the correct choice of a high performance bearing for any given racing application is much like determining what clearance works best. From past experience, our knowledge of the intended usage and common sense can guide us in making an initial choice. Next, we can fine tune the selection process based on those results. The information given here is intended to aid in the initial selection as well as the fine tuning process.
    Engine Bearing Installation and Fitting Tips
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    MEASURE CAREFULLY
    When measuring bearing measurements, they should always be taken at 90-degrees to the parting line to determine the minimum clearance. If measuring the bearing wall thickness, use a special micrometer with a ball anvil to fit the curvature of the bearing ID. The best way to determine bearing clearance is to measure the bearing ID with the bearings installed in the housing and the bolts torqued to the specified assembly torque. Use a dial bore gauge to measure the bearing ID at 90-degrees to the parting line, then subtract shaft size from bearing ID to determine the clearance. If the dial bore gauge is zeroed at the actual diameter of the crankshaft journal to be installed, the dial bore gauge will then read clearance directly and the subtraction calculation can be eliminated. About .001" clearance per inch of shaft diameter is a good rule of thumb. Increasing that by about .0005" will add a little margin of safety when starting out, especially for rods. Example: .001" X 2.100 = .0021" then add .0005", so starting out set clearance at .0026" for a 2.100 shaft.

    If clearance adjustments need to be made, use either an extra clearance part for more clearance or an undersize part for less clearance. It is permissible to mix sizes if less than .001" adjustment in clearance is desired. When mixing sizes for a select fitting: a) never mix parts having more than .0005" difference in wall size; b) and always install the thickest wall shell in the upper position if installing a rod bearing or the lower position if installing a main bearing. When working with a reground shaft, always measure assembled bearing ID's first. Next have a shaft sized to produce the desired clearance since there are no extra clearance parts available for undersize shafts.

    When measuring a bearing ID or wall thickness, avoid measuring at the parting line. The diagram illustrates there is a parting line relief machined into nearly all bearing shells. This relief is to allow for any mis-match between upper and lower shells due to tolerance differences, or possibly resulting from cap shift or twist during assembly. To determine bearing wall eccentricity or assembled bearing ID ovality, measure at a point at least 3/8" away from the parting line.

    When installing any bearing DO NOT ATTEMPT TO POLISH THE BEARING RUNNING SURFACE WITH ANY TYPE OF ABRASIVE PAD OR PAPER. Bearing overlay layers are extremely soft and thin – typically .0005" on high performance parts. These thin layers can easily be damaged or removed by an abrasive media. Because the overlay layer is electroplated, it may exhibit microscopic plating nodules that make it feel slightly rough. The nodules are the same material as the rest of the plated layer and will quickly be flattened by the shaft. Bearing surfaces can be lightly burnished with solvent and a paper towel if desired.
    The following table serves as a brief overview of the features included in each of the special Clevite 77® brand high performance bearing series.
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    HERES A TIP FROM A DIFFERENT SITE ON BUILDING A 4" STROKE SBC COMBO!
    And SHP block with a 4 inch arm is not a very good choice in IMHO if you maesure the cylinder lenth of the SHP Compared to the OEM 400 block the SHP block the cylinders are .250 shorter. You have to much piston hanging out pf the bore at BDC.

    Here is a quote from another engine builder which I agree with 100%

    We don't offer engine options in the 4.00 inch stroke version, (434/440) as well as the 4.125x4.00=427 It is because we feel them to be very short lived compared to the 4.155x3.875=421 stroke used in this short block. You may hear of those running the 4.00 inch stroke in competitive racing events but engine reliability and longevity are not the major concern. When it come to street rod use, it is in our opinion a somewhat short lived build. The 3.875 stroke is not like this, when using a high performance block such as the one used in our engines. You will not hear of engine failures on the 3.875 stroke builds as compared to the 4.00 inch. It would not cost us one dollar more for the parts and a very slight amount of labor to move up to the deeper stroke engine, but we are fairly certain it's the wrong route to take. We have found that many of the people buying engines for a street rod in this price range would like to know that this is the last engine they will need for many years to come.

    If I was to build a 427 SBC it would be a Little-M 4.185 bore and 3.875 stroke as it makes for a much happier engine.

    EXAMPLE pay attention to the bore stroke ratios, a 307 with its greater bore and shorter stroke , and slightly ;larger displacement and less valve shrouding should ALWAYS show a slight advantage in performance


    Chevy V8 bore & stroke chart

    Post by RebStew on Fri 08 Feb 2008, 3:28 pm
    CHEVY SMALLBLOCK V-8 BORE AND STROKE


    262 = 3.671" x 3.10" (Gen. I, 5.7" rod)
    265 = 3.750" x 3.00" ('55-'57 Gen.I, 5.7" rod)
    265 = 3.750" x 3.00" ('94-'96 Gen.II, 4.3 liter V-8 "L99", 5.94" rod)
    267 = 3.500" x 3.48" (Gen.I, 5.7" rod)
    283 = 3.875" x 3.00" (Gen.I, 5.7" rod)
    293 = 3.779" x 3.27" ('99-later, Gen.III, "LR4" 4.8 Liter Vortec, 6.278" rod)
    302 = 4.000" x 3.00" (Gen.I, 5.7" rod)
    305 = 3.736" x 3.48" (Gen.I, 5.7" rod)
    307 = 3.875" x 3.25" (Gen.I, 5.7" rod)

    325 = 3.779" x 3.622" ('99-later, Gen.III, "LM7", "LS4 front wheel drive V-8" 5.3 Liter Vortec, 6.098" rod)
    327 = 4.000" x 3.25" (Gen.I, 5.7" rod)
    345 = 3.893" x 3.622" ('97-later, Gen.III, "LS1", 6.098" rod)
    350 = 4.000" x 3.48" (Gen.I, 5.7" rod)
    350 = 4.000" x 3.48" ('96-'01, Gen. I, Vortec, 5.7" rod)
    350 = 3.900" x 3.66" ('89-'95, "LT5", in "ZR1" Corvette 32-valve DOHC, 5.74" rod)
    364 = 4.000" x 3.622" ('99-later, Gen.III, "LS2", "LQ4" 6.0 Liter Vortec, 6.098" rod)
    376 = 4.065" x 3.622" (2007-later, Gen. IV, "L92", Cadillac Escalade, GMC Yukon)
    383 = 4.000" x 3.80" ('00, "HT 383", Gen.I truck crate motor, 5.7" rod)
    400 = 4.125" x 3.75" (Gen.I, 5.565" rod)
    427 = 4.125" x 4.00" (2006 Gen.IV, LS7 SBC, titanium rods)

    Two common, non-factory smallblock combinations:

    377 = 4.155" x 3.48" (5.7" or 6.00" rod)
    400 block and a 350 crank with "spacer" main bearings
    383 = 4.030" x 3.75" (5.565" or 5.7" or 6.0" rod)
    350 block and a 400 crank, main bearing crank journals
    cut to 350 size



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    CHEVY BIG BLOCK V-8 BORE AND STROKE


    366T = 3.935" x 3.76"
    396 = 4.096" x 3.76"
    402 = 4.125" x 3.76"
    427 = 4.250" x 3.76"
    427T = 4.250" x 3.76"
    454 = 4.250" x 4.00"
    496 = 4.250" x 4.37" (2001 Vortec 8100, 8.1 liter)
    502 = 4.466" x 4.00"
    572T = 4.560" x 4.375" (2003 "ZZ572" crate motors)
    these threads have good related info, that you should read thru before starting the block prep, and rotating assembly process

    viewtopic.php?f=51&t=125

    viewtopic.php?f=53&t=3897

    viewtopic.php?f=53&t=2795

    viewtopic.php?f=53&t=852

    viewtopic.php?f=44&t=700&p=973#p973

    viewtopic.php?f=44&t=38

    viewtopic.php?f=51&t=588

    viewtopic.php?f=53&t=2726

    viewtopic.php?f=51&t=1458

    viewtopic.php?f=53&t=1797

    viewtopic.php?f=53&t=2727

    viewtopic.php?f=53&t=3449

    viewtopic.php?f=51&t=976

    viewtopic.php?f=53&t=247
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 29, 2019
  2. Grumpy

    Grumpy The Grumpy Grease Monkey mechanical engineer. Staff Member

    https://gmtoolsandequipment.com/en-US/Pages/ItemDetail.aspx?SKU=J-41479-2B

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    one piece rear main seal
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    don,t get all that concerned ,with asking the wrong question or forgetting to ask the correct questions,
    it may help if you start by reading through these basic thread's then , youll have a better basis for asking questions
    but remember the only dumb questions are those you ignored or forgot to ask, or assumed you knew the answers too.

    example of (engine building" vs parts assembly)
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    Id bet 80% or more of the people assembling parts have never checked most component clearances ,
    except in most cases for ring end gap and bearing to crank journal, as thats almost mandatory.
    things like,
    piston to the cylinder head (quench)
    piston to valve,
    rocker slot to rocker stud,
    connecting rod to cam lobe,
    connecting rod to block skirt,
    piston skirt to crank counterweight,
    cam button to the timing cover,
    spring bind height,
    rod side clearance,
    thrust bearing clearance,
    ring end gap and piston slot back clearance on rings.
    piston to bore clearance.
    pushrod to the cylinder head, or guide plate,
    crank journal taper and concentricity and surface smoothness
    cylinder head surface and not being warped
    cleaning out all the threaded holes with a tap.
    sonic testing bore walls
    having the block , crank and heads checked for micro-cracks
    verifying the oil pump drive shaft has about .050 clearance with the distributor fully seated,
    replace and shim distributor gear with new cam installation
    verify oil pump relief spring function, test to ensure it opens at no higher than 70 psi
    checking for crank straitness.
    verify crank journal to counter weight junction has consistent radias
    verify head gasket opening is at least .030 larger than bore diameter all the way around bore circumference
    verifying main cap concentricity and shoulder depth.
    verify pushrod length and valve train geometry.
    timing chain slack, and/or lack of clearance to the timing cover.
    verify theres no crud inside push rods or block oil passages.

    verify the block oil passages and bearing oil holes align properly (correct and bevel as required)
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    MEASURE CAREFULLY

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    notice how the rod bolts come close to the cam bearings as the pistons reach top dead canter in the bores
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    http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/bearing-clearances.2726/

    http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...tion-of-crank-durring-short-blk-assembly.852/

    http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/another-rings-end-gap-question.14994/

    http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...ng-and-basic-piston-ring-info-youll-need.509/

    http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/engine-assembly-tips.4294/

    ,
    http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/tbucket-engine-project-dart-shp.3814/

    http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/block-prep.125/

    http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/cam-bearing-install-tools-install-info.1479/

    http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/grinding-block-for-stroker-assembly.2855/

    http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/one-torque-plate-honing-plate-or-two.13360/

    http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/installing-engine-bearings.831/

    http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/sbc-cylinder-wall-thickness.7646/

    http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...e-springs-and-setting-up-the-valve-train.181/

    http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...g-and-installing-connecting-rods-pistons.247/

    http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...ng-and-basic-piston-ring-info-youll-need.509/

    http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...-about-your-potential-dream-bbc-combos.14607/

    http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/types-of-crankshaft-steel.204/

    http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/oil-system-mods-that-help.2187/
     
    Last edited: Nov 23, 2019
  3. Grumpy

    Grumpy The Grumpy Grease Monkey mechanical engineer. Staff Member

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