Gun Building

Grumpy

The Grumpy Grease Monkey mechanical engineer.
Staff member
the few guys that have the skills required are very rare and vastly under appreciated and in most cases under paid.
it requires decades to get those skills perfected, an apprenticeship,
and unfortunately people only live for 20-30 years while still having the eyesight,
and manual dexterity to be truly masters at the trade.
that is unfortunately a dying art form in most of the world, with high tech automation replacing skilled craftsmen.
and while automation may cut costs the fine fit and perfect function, of a hand made gun, is also generally sacrificed.
we live in a society that no longer values a high quality firearm, being maintained and passed down for generations
 

drcook

Member
we live in a society that no longer values a high quality <INSERT HERE>, being maintained and passed down for generations

We live in a society that doesn't value anything of high quality passed down. That concept had a stake driven through its heart by mechanization and the need to keep replacing items to stay in business. Hence planned obsolescence and/or a continuous cycle of "new and better features" (that you don't use much of anyway) to replace the prior product.
 

T-Test

solid fixture here in the forum
We live in a society that doesn't value anything of high quality passed down. That concept had a stake driven through its heart by mechanization and the need to keep replacing items to stay in business. Hence planned obsolescence and/or a continuous cycle of "new and better features" (that you don't use much of anyway) to replace the prior product.

Are you talking people or materials? It's the old timers that are disappearing with the knowledge to make quality goods.
No company will hire you for experience anymore if you're over 50 years old.

Like I said in another tread--thre is no such thing as DURABLE GOODS anymore.
 

drcook

Member
Of course materials. One prime example is an automobile. They are engineered for 7 to 10 years. How could a company stay in business if their stuff lasted for ever ?

BTW, I am one of those old timers that knew stuff. I am 62. I was a high precision machinist/tool & die maker when I was in my 20's. I was involved in the military buildup that helped bring down the Soviet Union. I machined up the tuners and other parts that let a particular nuke missile actually work. Until I got involved they were shorting out and/or had over a 50% scrap rate. I took it to 2% failure because I understood metal.

One time I actually single point threaded a 0000 thread to repair an instrument. No one believed I could cut a thread that small. I have worked on parts under a 16 power microscope. Of course I had the lathe that allowed such small work. Those lathes are no longer made. Knock offs yes, but the good ones, no.

If we ever get into another big dustup, there won't be enough little shops and people to get it all going again. Most of the shops I worked in are gone.
 
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