hey I just picked up FUELIE HEADS FOR CHEAP..

grumpyvette

Administrator
Staff member
"hey GRUMPYVETTE,I just picked up 492 FUELIE HEADS FOR CHEAP..CAN I GET THEM TO PRODUCE 400 HP!"
SURE you can get those heads to produce 400hp, but for the same money you could most likeky make an additional 40-60 more hp with better aftermarket cylinder heads,
now Im not saying that the guy selling those fuelie heads may not have even more cash invested in machine work than hes asking for the heads, machine work invested in those heads, can easily get expensive,its just that paying big bucks for fuelie heads , when your goal is making power and not building a period correct numbers matching car restoration is LUDICROUS, as most of the better aftermarket heads easily out perform them, even if you bought them thinking they were a good deal, you would be out looking for better heads within the year, and be out the money you spent, because they flow less than vortec truck heads , theres easily an extra 40-60 hp in better heads.
its easy to spend $500 plus on old heads reconditioning them, but the fact is that the 50 year old technology, small ports and less than ideal design, plus dealing with 40-50 year old castings makes buying those heads as a practical choice a joke compared to better heads currently available.
Look were all on a budget , and I know the $400-$500 range for reworked fuelie heads, spent sounds a good deal better than some of the more expensive options, but in the long run its wasted cash!
most older FUELIE or camel hump heads are now 45 plus years old and in need of a total rebuild with new hardened valve seats, (needed to run unleaded fuel) new valve guides , (probably new valves ) and certainly a new 3 angle valve job that will be mandatory with the new hardened valve seats, new valve springs , new valve seals etc. and its anyone guess as to the extent of rust damage to the internal coolant passage walls, or stress cracks, or heat warp damage, and even with mild port work they won,t flow as well as the newer vortec style ports, with mild port and bowl work, making the cost to value far from ideal, in a performance engine rebuild, you could very easily spend in excess of $600-$700 installing new valve seats, larger valves valve springs and screw in rocker studs in older fuelie heads only to find they flow CONSIDERABLY LESS , air flow and as a result make noticeable less power than a set of out of the box aftermarket cylinder heads, of a more current design.
Some of the More Popular Gen I Cast Iron GM Cylinder Heads

http://www.onedirt.com/tech-stories/engine/a-guide-to-vortec-vs-oe-small-block-chevy-heads/

#3767754 – Manufactured from 1959-1961 on 283 Cubic Inch engines. Called the “Power Pack” cylinder heads. 1.72˝ intake valves and 1.50˝ exhaust valves. 60cc Combustion Chambers.

#3774692 – Manufactured from 1958-1964 on 283 Cubic Inch engines. Called the “Power Pack” cylinder heads. 1.72˝ intake valves and 1.50˝ exhaust valves. 60cc Combustion Chambers.

#3795896 – Manufactured from 1963-1965 on 283 Cubic Inch engines. Called the “Power Pack” cylinder heads. 1.72˝ intake valves and 1.50˝ exhaust valves. 60cc Combustion Chambers.

#3782461 – Manufactured from 1964-1966 on 327 Cubic Inch engines. 161/62 cc port volumes, 62cc combustion chamber. Identified by Double Camel hump symbol.

#3782461X – Manufactured from 1960-1963 on 283 and 327 Cubic Inch engines. 172/64 cc port volumes, 62cc combustion chamber. Identified by Double Camel hump symbol.

#3890462 – Manufactured from 1966-1967 on 302, 327, and 350 Cubic Inch engines. 64cc combustion chamber. Identified by Camel hump symbol. No accessory mounting holes.

#3917291 – Manufactured from 1967-1968 on 302, 327, and 350 Cubic Inch engines. 64cc combustion chamber. Identified by Camel hump symbol.

#3932441 – Manufactured from 1969-1970 on 350 Cubic Inch engines. 161-165cc intake port. 76cc combustion chamber.

#3932441X – Manufactured from 1969-1970 on 350 and 400 Cubic Inch engines. 161/65cc ports. 80cc combustion chamber. 1.94″ intake/1.5″ exhaust valves.

#333881 – Manufactured from 1974-1975 on 350 Cubic Inch engines. 76cc combustion chamber. 2.02″ intake/1.6″ Exhaust valves.

#3991492 – Manufactured from 1970 on 350 Cubic Inch engines. Available on the LT1 engine and over the counter. 64cc combustion chamber. Either straight or angled plugs.


headmar1.png

headmar.png

buying out dated fuelie heads with todays increased tech aftermarket heads available if max performance is your goal is a bad joke, as you can easily put $1200 into machine work and porting and not come close to some of the better current aluminum aftermarket head flow levels
castx.jpg


Most Stock “double hump” heads flow in the range of 202 cfm intake and 141 cfm on the exhaust, in the typical lift of a average muscle car era race cam, where valve lift rarely exceeded .550 higher lift and increased duration adds little to flow, mild port work and a multi angle valve job by a skilled & experienced port work job can generally increase peak flow to the 230-237 cfm int 200 ex range.

fueliex1.jpg

these were great heads back in the 1960s but current design and testing technology has far surpassed that flow and power level nearly 60 years after they were originally used.
fueliex2.jpg

BTW not all fuelie heads had similar potential, or the larger 2.02/1.60 valves ,the 461X head casting was one of the better options , but still required rather extensive mods to perform at its max potential, if your looking for (X) on the fuelie head casting, the 461X head is that the intake port, this head is 170 cc intake port casting where all the other camel hump heads are 155 cc. This was worth 15-35 hp depending on what they allowed you to do with the port work and valves on the heads, and that hp difference was competitively significant.

Fast forward to more modern times, the 350 Vortec heads have 170 cc intake ports. That is most of their advantage compared to other cast iron heads also.

A VIDEO DART VS 882 chevy heads TO WATCH
http://www.youtube.com/watch?annotation ... v3ZkqZiMjI

http://www.jegs.com/i/Dart/301/127422/10002/-1?parentProductId=1691309#moreDetails

http://www.airflowresearch.com/index.php?cPath=24_29

http://www.jegs.com/i/Brodix/158/1021001/10002/-1?parentProductId=760699

http://www.profilerperformance.com/raci ... -23-degree

http://forum.grumpysperformance.com/viewtopic.php?f=44&t=2099&p=17024&hilit=FUELIE#p17024
viewtopic.php?f=52&t=3613&p=12743&hilit=fuelie#p12743

http://www.jegs.com/i/GM+Performance/80 ... 6/10002/-1

http://www.summitracing.com/parts/DRT-10311112P/

http://www.summitracing.com/parts/TFS-30400001/

http://www.jegs.com/i/GM+Performance/80 ... 0/10002/-1

http://www.jegs.com/i/Brodix/158/1021004/10002/-1

http://www.profilerperformance.com/sbc-heads-176.html


3991492....70......350..........LT1,Camel hump,accessory holes,64cc, straight plug
3991492....70-up................over the counter,Camel hump,64cc, straight or angle plug


ALMOST ALL the FUELIE heads CAN support 400 plus flywheel hp IF THE OTHER COMPONENTS USED are well matched, and you do a port & bowl area clean up on the heads,clearance them for a .600 valve lift add the right springs and screw in rocker studs and make sure the displacement and compression ratio, and cam timing are carefully matched to the cars gearing, but your dealing with heads that are about 40 year old technology and in questionable condition,

want a combo that easily gets there,
build a balanced /correctly clearanced 10.5:1 cpr 383 sbc with
this cam

http://www.crower.com/misc/cam_spec/cam_finder.php?part_num=00351&x=36&y=7

this intake

http://www.summitracing.com/parts/HLY-300-110/

full length 1 5/8" tuned headers and a decent 750cfm carb and a good ignition
matched to a 4.11:1 rear gear and a manual transmission, and feed it race octane gas
its going to be a P.I.T.A. on the street but it will get you 400hp at the fly wheel if you do it correctly


"the question usually goes, hey, got a chance to buy fuelie heads for $100- $500, is this a great deal or what?"
thirty years ago FUELIE HEADS were the HOT TICKET
but your dealing with heads that are thirty year old technology, they will most likely need at least a valve job,new valve guides and new springs and port work, by the time you put that much work and money in those heads you'll have more than likely spent more money for worse results than buying the more modern heads that have not had 30 plus years of stress,corrosion,and bad valve jobs

http://www.fastnuf.com/Headguide.html

HERES AVERAGE FUELIE HEAD FLOW NUMBERS

http://www.kendrick-auto.com/462_chevy_head.htm

http://www.purplesagetradingpost.com/su ... eads1.html

heres two common performance cylinder heads that are available today measured on the same flow bench

http://www.kendrick-auto.com/dart_cs_iron_eagle_215.htm

http://www.kendrick-auto.com/brodix_track_i__cs.htm

THE CAM AND CYLINDER Heads are some of the MOST IMPORTANT PARTS ON YOUR ENGINE AS FAR AS DETERMINING YOUR HP/TQ POTENTIAL
YES THE FUELIE HEADS ARE BETTER THAN MOST STOCK HEADS, YES THEY CAN BE PORTED BY EXPERTS AND MAKE GOOD HP,BUT BY TODAY'S STANDARDS THEY ARE STILL LESS THAN IDEAL.
EVEN THE COMMON VORTEC TRUCK HEADS CAN EASILY OUT FLOW THEM,

http://www.kendrick-auto.com/vortec_cs_gm_head.htm

DO YOURSELF A HUGE FAVOR AND IF YOU SPEND MONEY ON ALMOST NO OTHER PARTS BUY GOOD HEADS, LOOK AT THESE ENGINE BUILDS

http://www.ryanscarpage.50megs.com/combos1.html

THE ONE THING YOU'LL FIND OUT IS HIGH HP ENGINES REQUIRE GOOD CYLINDER HEADS AND A MATCHING CAM, I CAN,T THINK OF A MUCH BIGGER OR MORE COMMON MISTAKE THAT TRYING TO BUILD MAX PERFORMANCE WHILE RESTRICTING THE ENGINES POTENTIAL WITH STOCK HEADS
a rough FORMULA/gauge to guess the hp POTENTIAL FROM THE CYLINDER HEADS FLOW NUMBERS is (.257 x flow at max cam lift x 8= potential max hp)
so if you have 225cfm= about 462 hp
if you have 260cfm= 535 hp
now your highly unlikely to reach MAX HP POTENTIAL but the better heads will almost ALWAYS SHOW that 15% or better results. on a 400hp engine running fuelie heads that is likely to mean you would have had 460hp with the better heads (15% improvement)
look over these heads
ALPHABETICAL ORDER

AFR
BRODIX
CANFIELD
DART
EDELBROCK
G.M. PERFORMANCE
PRO ACTION
TRICKFLOW
WORLD PRODUCTS
heads they all have better heads

LINKS WORTH READING
http://www.strokerengine.com/SBCHeadsFlow.html

http://www.circletrack.com/enginetech/c ... index.html

http://forum.grumpysperformance.com/viewtopic.php?f=52&t=240&p=5334&hilit=+numbers#p5334

http://forum.grumpysperformance.com/viewtopic.php?f=52&t=333&p=407#p407
 
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grumpyvette

Administrator
Staff member
should you use the fuelies if you have them?
it depends mostly on the condition of the heads,(remember fuelies are on average over 40 plus years old)and on both WHICH fuelie heads they are, and the valve sizes,if they are not 2.02/1.6 (if your willing to do minor port, bowl and combustion chamber mods like un-shrouding valves) Id suggest going vortec.
and if your going to have the vortec compatible parts like valve covers, rockers, intake, etc. but in almost every case the VORTEC HEADS will produce slightly better power, unless you do those mods to the fuelie heads
both are not top choices by todays standards
typical reworked fuelie

http://www.circletrack.com/enginetech/c ... index.html

http://www.kendrick-auto.com/462_chevy_head.htm

http://www.castheads.com/cylinder-heads/factory-chevy/chevy-double-hump-heads/

http://www.onedirt.com/forum/guide-vort ... -2016.html

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=5537

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=8596&p=30222#p30222

vortec
http://www.kendrick-auto.com/vortec_cs_gm_head.htm

keep in mind the average fuelie head has a smaller 155cc-163cc port than the typical vortec at about 170cc, and the higher port angle on the vortec heads flows better

http://www.purplesagetradingpost.com/su ... l#GM%20LT4

as you can see in this chart most of the stock heads don,t flow as well as the AFR 195cc heads and there ARE better flowing heads
image17of.png



youll want to take the time to do the math and compare components, lets for a second assume your,debating these two heads,
if you compare the 195cc vs 210cc AFR heads, all the way
theres a significant improvement in flow and a negligible decrease in port flow speed
theres always a compromise made between cost and potential power,
and obviously you want to match components to the intended power and rpm range,
but having seen a bunch of 383 builds use both AFR heads,
I think the 210cc choice here, is a no brainer if you can afford the price.


heres a chart FROM THE BOOK,HOW TO BUILD BIG-INCH CHEVY SMALL BLOCKS with some common cross sectional port sizes
(measured at the smallest part of the ports)
...........................sq inches........port cc
edelbrock performer rpm ....1.43.............170
vortec......................1.66.............170
tfs195......................1.93.............195
afr 180.....................1.93.............180
afr 195.....................1.98.............195
afr 210.....................2.05.............210
dart pro 200................2.06.............200
dart pro 215................2.14.............215
brodix track 1 .............2.30.............221
dart pro 1 230..............2.40.............230
edelbrock 23 high port .....2.53.............238
edelbrock 18 deg............2.71.............266
tfs 18 deg..................2.80.............250

Potential HP based on Airflow (Hot Rod, Jun '99, p74):
Airflow at 28" of water x 0.257 x number of cylinders = potential HP
or required airflow based on HP:
HP / 0.257 / cylinders = required airflow

if we compare the head air flow rates between a 195cc and 210cc head on a 383-406 SBC and assuming a decent roller cam with the lift and duration,required, and intake that allows the heads to flow at their full potential,
195cc Street Head Flow Chart
.200 .300 .400 .500 .550
Int 146 201 247 275 280
Exh 119 166 197 213 218



210cc Race Ready Head Flow Chart
.200 .300 .400 .500 .550 .600 .650
Int 145 199 255 292 301 309 311
Exh 110 158 192 210 214 220 222


if you compare peak intake rated flow at .550 lift
280 cfm vs 301 cfm (about a 9% increase) youll see why
thats in theory potentially a 43 hp gain


viewtopic.php?f=50&t=10728

http://www.2quicknovas.com/vortecheads.html

http://sallee-chevrolet.com/Cylinder_Heads/Vortec.cfm

FUELIE HEADS
441x.png




fuelieheads.jpg


vortecpicb.jpg

DART HEADS
dartheads.jpg

CHEVY 882 smogger heads

882heads.jpg





VORTEC HEADS
if your wondering if theres a way to determine if the cylinder heads you have or are looking at are vortec heads,
yes pull the valve cover and get the casting number
and look at the end of the heads casting markings

castingnumbervortec.jpg

p177895_image_large.jpg

0511sc_vortec_10_z.jpg

vortecheads1.jpg

rhs heads
rhsalum.jpg


casting numbers
10239906 and 12558062..96-up...350.........."Vortec 5700", "L31", 64cc chamber,
170cc intake port, 1.94"/1.5" valves

380 cu in vortec head build
heres a mild high torque build using a set of mildly reworked vortec heads and a chevy hot cam.

Recently I built a 380 inch small block with 906 Vortec heads for Pat Mcneil. The build: 4.020 X 3.750, 10.1 compression, hyd roller on a steel billet 218/228/112/109/.525, Crane/GM LT 4 1.6 roller rocker arms, very mild, Ferrea 1.940/1.50 stainless valves, GM titanium retainers, GM locators, GM valve springs, the 906 Vortec heads featured honed bronze valve guides, race valve job, spring pockets cut, machined for screw in studs, fully ported, 65 CCs, Performer RPM intake, 850 Holley, 31 degrees total timing, 5 quarts 10/30 Valvoline oil.
IMG_3008.jpg

2972vt.jpg

IMG_3007.jpg

If your going to run vortec heads, you either check you have clearance on current heads, with accurate precision tools and/or if you find you don,t have the required clearance,your going to be forced to modify current heads or you could buy heads with the correct clearance


reading the related info will be helpful
http://www.summitracing.com/parts/sum-151124

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...train-clearances-and-problems.528/#post-57678

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...ting-up-the-valve-train.181/page-2#post-54091

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/what-springs.11352/#post-51960

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...-loads-and-installed-height.10709/#post-46627

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/removing-valve-seals.4283/#post-44287


http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/the-new-215cc-vortec-heads.266/#post-35948

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...-vortec-heads-and-other-heads.401/#post-34996

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/vortec-info.529/#post-27299

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...o-the-large-port-vortec-heads.1040/#post-1943

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/vortec-related-info.731/#post-1028
 
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grumpyvette

Administrator
Staff member
by todays standards those old fuelie heads are about as performance oriented as a ford pinto with a dead battery and flat tires
youll pay more to get a good 3 angle valve job, pocket port them and install new valve guides "which they probably need being 40 plus years old" that their performance potentials worth
when your building a performance engine the cylinder heads you select are a critical component in the combos power potential, the heads you select, depends on the application,in stock condition the stock heads are fine on a car designed for transportation,(they function) but not very effective as a power producing option, but then theres very few stock cast iron sbc OEM heads other than vortecs in stock form that came as original equipment that are worth much by comparison to current aftermarket designs.
its a financial P.I.T.A. but the days of putting a minor port and bowl clean-up on a set of stock heads and being competitive on a track are long gone.
now don,t take this wrong, an extensively ported set of fuelie or vortec heads on a well designed combo can easily develop 400-450plus even in some cases 500 hp , its just that in the long run, its going to be faster cheaper and easier to reach or exceed any specific hp level using the better aftermarket heads currently available.
it makes little sense to me to put $1000 or more into additional machine work and porting costs on stock cast iron heads to just equal the out of the box potential of a good set of after market heads, especially when you consider the additional potential power the aftermarket heads still have, plus in most cases aluminum heads tend to be far easier to repair, lighter in weight and less prone to detonation, because they tend to run a bit cooler
look thru these
http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...ing-cast-iron-can-make-a-preacher-cuss.12647/

http://www.purplesagetradingpost.com/su ... eads1.html
notice all the more impressive combos use better heads
http://www.ryanscarpage.50megs.com/combos1.html

image17of.png


http://www.purplesagetradingpost.com/sumner/techinfo/heads1.html

http://forum.grumpysperformance.com/viewtopic.php?f=44&t=2099&p=6895&hilit=fuelie#p6895


when modern ported heads flow nearly 300cfm why would you use something that struggles to flow 200cfm in stock condition,or 230cfm after your average mild rework
195ccCP.gif


http://www.airflowresearch.com/index.php?cPath=24_29
http://www.popularhotrodding.com/engine ... ewall.html

you might want to read thru this carefully,its an interesting build that gives a good deal of info if you read carefully, they build a 447hp 350 with vortec heads for under $4K
matching components to the application is critical and they do a better than average job in this build.
if you notice the power curve youll see that torque peaks at about 4700rpm with that 350 displacement,
vflow1.jpg

if youve been paying attention in the threads discussing head flow and power thats a good indication that the ports about maxed out at 4700rpm on a 350 displacement with those vortec heads
fe008cfd.gif

if youve been reading the cam related threads you can see, why a cam in the 230-240 duration range is about the absolute max duration that will provide decent results with a set of vortec heads,and that the blue bar on the chart for the 220-230 duration is almost perfectly matching the head flow rate restiction level, simply because adding duration past that 230-335 cam duration range effectively moves the power curve up above the rpm range a vortec head easily supports, they select a 224 duration cam on a tight 108 LSA to maximize mid rpm torque to complement the vortec heads characteristic of great low and mid rpm flow, but realizing above about 5000rpm your not filling the cylinder effectively.
vflow.jpg

Duration_v_RPM-Range_wIntakeManifold01.jpg



viewtopic.php?f=52&t=5321&p=16006&hilit=volumetric#p16006

just a bit of math, if a 350 displacement maxes out the head flow at about 4700rpm, and lets say we want to build a 383?
4700 x 350 /383=4300rpm so you could expect the same combo to max those same vortecs head flow at about 4300rpm in as similar 383sbc combo

part of the reason the web site exists....its here hopefully allowing the newer guys to avoid many of the problems ,
that my, friends and I ran into, over the decades in this hobby, and hopefully the web site will help you, avoid the frustration ...
and experiences of several of the older guys ,I used to hang out with, had both good and bad, experiences ,
during 45 plus years of not being able to find a easy to access source of correct related info on how things should be done and
how knowing often,my friends and I ran into scammers at local machine shops,
and speed shops, that deliberately either gave B.S. info or did sub-standard machine work.
In this hobby of building cars and modifying drive trains for increased performance, doing your research into how things should be done correctly, is key!
if you get to know an honest machinist in a local machine shop that will take the time to explain ,
how some machine work is done and why its required you'll be far better off.
youll notice most threads have sub-links they are there to help you find related and useful info,
skip reading the links and you will generally regret it later.


http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...-the-rabbit-hole-with-alice.10933/#post-52567

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/hello-grumpyvette-here.278/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/tbucket-engine-project-dart-shp.3814/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/matching-parts-and-a-logical-plan.7722/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/what-to-look-for-in-a-good-engine-combo.9930/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/dorian’s-big-block-c3-build.12810/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/383-information-overload.11137/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/tweaking-a-350-383.13087/#post-68195

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...ing-a-383-sbc-combo-planing.12168/#post-58778

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...ng-and-basic-piston-ring-info-youll-need.509/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...e-springs-and-setting-up-the-valve-train.181/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/precision-measuring-tools.1390/#post-68861

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/a-high-torque-406.12184/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...gine-to-match-the-cam-specs.11764/#post-55571
 
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grumpyvette

Administrator
Staff member
theres lots of options in cylinder heads that are a decent value,what you select depends on your goals and skill at matching components to the application ,
but keep in mind a great deal of your engines power potential is dependent on CORRECTLY MATCHING the heads,cam, intake and engine displacement and compression ratio to the cars drive train, yes it may take a few hours reading but its well worth the effort
headmar1.png

headmar.png

vortecsawf.jpg

462624
350
76-87
1.94/1.50 2.02/1.60
med_1484749189-IMG_20170118_053414.jpg

heads tend to crack if over heated or incorrectly torqued
if you have zero deck to head distance I'd suggest a .040-.042 thick head gasket should be used

for a 9.3 compression, 327 with a 3.08 rear gear, and auto trans, Id suggest a cam like a crane 114132

https://www.summitracing.com/parts/crn-114132

with the correct matched components 350 hp should be doable, btw mild port and bowl area clean-up can allow these heads to have improved flow, they will never be a great choice but they can be improved
use of long tube headers a low restriction exhaust and a cam with a bit more lift and duration can help compensate for the restrictive ports some what.
I would certainly suggest a decent performance dual plane intake be selected,and port matched, and you certainly don,t need to spend a fortune
something like this easily improves flow if matched up correctly

https://www.summitracing.com/parts/wnd-8150

http://www.usaperform.com/sbc-torqu...-lifter-kit-275-deg-278-deg-435-455-lift.html

http://users.erols.com/srweiss/tablehdc.htm

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/porting-can-help.462/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...-by-step-guide-with-pictures.5378/#post-60990

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...lsa-effects-your-compression-torque-dcr.1070/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/port-speeds-and-area.333/
http://www.jegs.com/i/Brodix/158/1021001/10002/-1

http://www.summitracing.com/parts/TFS-30400001/

http://www.profilerperformance.com/sbc-heads-176.html

http://www.jegs.com/i/Dart/301/10521122P/10002/-1

http://www.summitracing.com/parts/AFR-1040/

viewtopic.php?f=53&t=4294&p=11325&hilit=books#p11325

viewtopic.php?f=44&t=38

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=796

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=181

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=1070

viewtopic.php?f=44&t=392

viewtopic.php?f=51&t=125

viewtopic.php?f=69&t=519

viewtopic.php?f=69&t=1598
 
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grumpyvette

Administrator
Staff member
"hey GRUMPYVETTE?, I want to build a killer 302 Z28 engine with the old dontov cam and rams horn exhaust so I can kick butt on the street"


about twice a month for many years I get asked a similar question, about building either a 327 or a 302 with fuelie heads, and my response is always the same
its cheaper and easier to build a 355-383 sbc that will make the 400 plus hp you want to make your car perform,and either one properly configured will show tail lights to a similar 302, theres a really good reason that the 302 has not remained a favorite combo, its that to produce good hp it requires camming and gearing the car so its no longer nearly close to ideal on a street car, it also requires an 11:1 compression ratio,(Sunoco 260 LEADED high octane gas) manual transmission and about a 4.11:1 rear gear to function, all of which makes the current low octane fuel and $3.70 a gallon gas prices less than ideal.
most original original as cast FUELIE heads were small high velocity port heads by the standards of the mid too later 1960s, but today even the standard vortec heads used on trucks in stock as cast form produce better flow numbers.
there are dozens of newer designs in aftermarket performance, SBC heads that significantly out perform even the best ported original fuelie heads.
fuelie heads, rams horn exhaust manifolds, and dontov 30/30 cams are 50 year old technology that has been far surpassed
because its very likely that by the time you hot tank or oven and shot-blast clean them
, have them dye or magnetically checked for cracks and pressure and have, a clean-up decking,pass on the milling machine,insert new valve guide inserts, select and install bigger valves , and that requires new valve seats with a good multi angle valve job, pay for and install the correct matched springs, keepers, and retainers,that came with the new cam, if you bought the matching components instead of trying to keep cost low and use the O.E.M. valve springs which are unlikely to match the application, you might be better off to buy new cylinder heads??

a valve train is far easier to control UNDER 6500rpm than at 7000PLUS rpm, and heads have been improved so much over the years that you no longer need to run a sbc over 7000rpm to make good hp, plus a 383 properly assembled and geared, with the newer heads and cams available will easily eat a similar 302cid-327 cid, displacement sbc engine powered cars lunch, a 302 is just no longer competitive in anything that weights over about 3200lbs
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492v462a.jpg

theres a great deal of info on building a 383 in these links and sub links

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...s-to-casting-numbers-and-info.632/#post-55259


viewtopic.php?f=69&t=519

viewtopic.php?f=69&t=1598

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=3613&p=12743#p12743

viewtopic.php?f=44&t=38

viewtopic.php?f=69&t=261

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=5078

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=5321

http://www.circletrack.com/enginetech/c ... ntake.html

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=4664

viewtopic.php?f=55&t=58

viewtopic.php?f=55&t=109

viewtopic.php?f=69&t=4120

viewtopic.php?f=69&t=4378
 
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grumpyvette

Administrator
Staff member
for those younger guys that were not around in the 1960,s and those guys who don,t remember the early 283 dual quad corvettes carburetors used on old dual quad 283 chevy.
there was a REASON dual quads were popular back in the day!
most single carbs at the time were rather small and limited in flow, the HOLLEY and Quadrajet were not available or nearly as popular as they were later, a few years made a big difference in what was commonly available.
these early dual quad set-ups were rated on the 283 at 245-270 hp and the individual carbs actually flowed at about 370 cfm if I'm remembering a dyno test I saw posted in a magazine at the time, and the intake manifold designs were very restrictive and heads on the fuelie corvettes which were considered excellent at the time were by today's standards
GOOD DOOR STOP MATERIAL AT BEST
But be aware that using stock refurbished heads , can cost a good deal more than new heads will,because its very likely that by the time you hot tank or oven and shot-blast clean them
, have them dye or magnetically checked for cracks and pressure and have, a clean-up decking,pass on the milling machine,insert new valve guide inserts, select and install bigger valves , and that requires new valve seats with a good multi angle valve job, pay for and install the correct matched springs, keepers, and retainers,that came with the new cam, if you bought the matching components instead of trying to keep cost low and use the O.E.M. valve springs which are unlikely to match the application, you might be better off to buy new cylinder heads??

remember the larger HOLLEY 4 barrel carbs like the 780 cfm that were common later on the big blocks and z28 were very rare back then.
most guys in the early 1960s ran RAMS HORN exhaust manifolds and had no clue that a low restriction exhaust and headers would make a major improvement in how the intake manifold flowed.

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...l79-cam-still-a-good-choice.10466/#post-43829

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...ed-up-fuelie-heads-for-cheap.2099/#post-17024

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...n-exhaust-info-you-might-need.572/#post-35308

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/dual-quads.444/#post-36004

http://www.hotrod.com/how-to/engine/ccrp-1209-eight-budget-sbc-head-shootout/

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DO YOUR RESEARCH CAREFULLY, ALL COMPONENTS DON,T WORK IN ALL COMBINATIONS OR APPLICATIONS

http://www.edelbrock.com/automotive/mc/cylinder-heads/
any of the performer or performer rpm heads will produce better power than the vortec heads on the 383 sbc is matched to that existing intake and nearly any reasonable cam selection, plus run cooler and weight less and be easier to repair or port if thats ever needed, that does not necessarily make them the only or best available option.

what seems to be over-looked in many engine builds is simply the fact you'll almost always DEEPLY regret jumping into the engine build with both feet and waving your check book as you sink ever deeper into piles of parts receipts and machine shop bills, rather than stepping back with a legal pad, and a calculator and listing in minute detail exactly what you want to accomplish, and taking the time and effort too list and check out in detail what each machine shop procedure costs, why its required and how much each components costs, what your options are and how each component will add too or benefit the completed combo (or in some cases cause you time and grief)
stepping back and thinking things through in detail and listing the cost and potential problems and finding the solutions BEFORE you dive into the process may be a lot less fun, but in the long term its sure to cost less and result in a far better finished project!
yes you'll ALWAYS NEED to verify clearances carefully when assembling any engine and no, you can,t assume everything will fit just because its part of a component list thats suppose to fit correctly, simply because manufacturing is an imprecise process and mistake do get made occasionally!
if you build enough engines youll eventually see a strong relationship, between higher initial cost and that spending a bit more on heads and rotating assembly and valve train components tends to significantly reduce the problems and increase the engines long term durability.

http://chevellestuff.net/qd/head_casting_by_year.htm
Chevelle V8 Cylinder Head Casting Numbers - 1964 through 1972
These head castings were used in various other models of the Chevrolet lineup such as the passenger car, Chevy II/Nova, Camaro and Corvette. Only Chevelle-specific information is listed here to conserve space. Some casting numbers are NOT listed as they may have been used in other models of the Chevrolet lineup but were NOT used in the Chevelle - such as the 1965 409cid heads #3830817 & #3852583 or 67 Camaro heads #3876775.

The casting number is probably the most significant feature on a cylinder head as it's the hardest to alter. The casting date is usually found near the casting number. Both are found under the valve cover be it a small block V8 (283/307/327/350) or big block Mark IV V8 (396/402/454).

It's important to remember the 'to' and 'from' dates listed may vary due to production lead time and stock inventories being depleted. For example just because a particular head casting may be listed as being used from January to April doesn't imply that the engine assembly plants discarded all pre-January heads or on the 1st of May discard all heads they had in inventory to begin using the newer design.

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Casting clocks. Note the 11 dots plus the number 0 indicating the particular hour of a shift the heads were cast.

Cylinder heads are normally date coded in the form of a letter for the month (see table below), two numbers for the day and a single number for the year. For example, C259 indicates a date of March 25, 1969.

V8 Cylinder Head Casting Month Codes
A - January B - February C - March D - April
E - May F - June G - July H - August
I - September J - October K - November L - December

Caveats to production dates. Due to inventories, shipping schedules, etc. it is entirely possible that cylinder heads being phased out of production may still appear on Chevelles built after that time.

Head
Number Year Engine Horsepower Valve Size
Int./Exh. Combustion
Chamber cc. Notes
3795896 1964 283
327 195, 220
250 1.72/1.50 59.669 Used in 1964 and 1965.
3782461 1964
1965
1966 327
327
327 300
250, 300
275 1.94/1.50 62.076 Production ended approximately June of 1966 and replaced with #3890462. Casting symbol on exterior face of head is the infamous double-hump design.
samp_3782461.jpg

1964
1965
1966 327
327
327 350
350
350 2.02/1.60 62.076 1966 is late March introduction.
3795896 1965 283 195, 220 1.72/1.50 59.669 Casting symbol on exterior face of head is single centered pyramid on square block.
samp_3795896.jpg

3856208 1965 396 375 2.19/1.75 108.989 First square-port Mark IV head. Has spark plug shield boss.
3872702 1966 396 325, 360 2.06/1.72 98.427 All oval-port applications. Has spark plug shield boss. It is debatable as to whether these plug shields were used on the Chevelle but the shields listed in Chevrolet parts books included the Chevelle application.
3873858 1966 396 375 2.19/1.72 108.989 All high performance square-port engine applications. Has spark plug shield boss.
3884520 1966
1967 283
283 195, 220
195 1.72/1.50 60.530
samp_3795896.jpg

3890462 1966
1967

1966 **
1967 327
327

327
327 275
275

350
325 1.94/1.50
1.94/1.50

2.02/1.60
2.02/1.60 62.076
63.305

62.076
63.305 Similar to 3782461. Used from January 1966 through May 1967.
samp_3782461.jpg

3904390 1967 396 325, 350 2.06/1.72 98.427 First head without spark plug shield boss. Used until January when replaced with #3909802.
3904391 1967 396 375 2.19/1.72 106.8 Used at least through May 1967 when replaced with #3919840.
samp_3904391.jpg

3909802 1967 396 325, 350 2.06/1.72 100.967 January through April of 1967, with redesigned combustion chamber. June 1967 casting dates have been reported for this head.
3911032 1968 307 200 1.72/1.50 69.629 Used in 1968 only. Has temperature sending unit boss.
samp_3911032.jpg

3917215 1967
1968 396 325, 350 2.06/1.72 100.967 First Mark IV oval-port with temperature sending unit boss, otherwise identical to #3909802. Production from May 1967 to May 1968.
3917291 1967
1968 327 275 1.94/1.50 63.305 Used in late 1967 (May/April) and all 1968. Identical to #3890462 except it has the temperature sending boss. The late 1967 unit has the temperature sending unit boss but is not tapped.
samp_3782461.jpg

3917291 1967
1968 327 325 2.02/1.60 63.995 Combustion chamber enlarged and valve guide boss diameter increased to accept the 2.02/1.60 valves.
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3917293 1968 327 250 1.72/1.50 75.340 Low compression, identical to #3884520 except for combustion chamber change and addition of temperature sending boss.
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3919840 1967
1968
1969 396 375 2.19/1.72 106.8 First Mark IV to have temperature sending boss. The late 1967 unit has the temperature sending unit boss but is not tapped. Identical to #3904391 except for temperature sending unit boss and two accessory bolt holes added.
samp_3904391.jpg

3919842 1969 396 375 (L89) 2.19/1.84 106.8 Aluminum head with temperature sending unit boss, two accessory holes drilled and tapped, revised exhaust manifold surface. Two versions were used during 1968 (non-Chevelle) and 1969. The 1968 and early 1969 version had plugs in both ends of the cylinder head. Approximately June of 1969 one plug was eliminated.
3927185 1969
1970 307 200 1.72/1.50 69.625 Identical to #3884520 except has temperature sending unit boss. Three accessory bolt holes added to each end of the head and combustion chamber revised.
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3927186 1969
1970 350 300 1.94/1.50 63.305 Similar to #3917291 & #3782461, but with temperature sending unit boss, three accessory holes and casting symbol was smaller.
samp_3927186.jpg

3931063 1969 396 325, 350 2.06/1.72 100.967 Similar to #3909802 & 3917215 with two accessory bosses above #3 (or #6) exhaust ports for air conditioning rear support bracket. Straight casting flashing.
3932441 1969
1970 350 250, 255
250 1.94/1.50 76.26 Similar to #3927186 with redesigned combustion chamber.
samp_3932441.jpg

3947041 1969
1970 350 300 1.94/1.50 63.305 Similar to #3782461 with redesigned combustion chamber, addition of a temperature sending unit boss and three accessory holes on end.
samp_3947041.jpg

3964290 1969
1970
1970 396
402
454 325, 350
330, 350
360 2.06/1.72 100.967 Similar to #3931063 with spark plug seat changed to tapered, "peanut" plug but early castings had standard, "N" reach plug. Straight casting flashing.
3964291 1969

1970 396
427
402
454 375
425
375
450 2.19/1.88 109.037 Similar to #3919840 with spark plug seat changed to tapered, "peanut" plug but early castings had standard, "N" reach plug. Last closed chamber cast iron square-port head. Produced in both plug designs for service replacement of 1965 through 1969 applications.
samp_3904391.jpg

3973487 1971
1972 350
350 245, 270
165, 175 1.94/1.50 75.47 Similar to #3832441 & #3782461 with redesigned combustion chamber, addition of temperature sending unit boss, three accessory bolt holes added to end of head, tapered spark plug seat and different external identification symbol cast near the internal casting number.
samp_3973487.jpg

3973487X 1972 350 165, 175 1.94/1.50 75.47 Used only in late 1972 and overlapped production with #3998993.
samp_3973487.jpg

3986339 1971 307 200 1.72/1.50 74.56 Similar to #3884520 with redesigned combustion chamber, temperature sending unit boss and tapered spark plug seat.
samp_3986339.jpg

3993820 1971 402
454 300
365 2.06/1.75 113.060 Cast iron, oval-port and similar to #3931063 with change to open-chamber design, redesigned intake and exhaust valve seats, and tapered spark plugs.
3994026 1971 454 425 2.19/1.88 118.000 Cast iron, square-port with tapered spark plug. Last Mark IV square-port with open chamber design.
3998991 1972 307 130 1.72/1.50 74.56 Similar to #3795896 with tapered spark plug, redesigned combustion chamber, and temperature sending unit boss. First head to use hardened valve seats for unleaded fuel.
samp_3986339.jpg

3998993 1972
1973
1973 350
307
350 165, 175
115
145, 175 1.94/1.50 75.47 Introduced mid-year (January) to replace #3973487X.
samp_3973487.jpg

3999241 1972 402
454 240
270 2.06/1.72 113.06 Similar to #3993820 with tapered spark plug seat.
353049 1973 454 245* 2.06/1.72 113.06 Used for all 1973 454 applications.
333882 1974-75
1974
1975 350
400
400 All
150, 180
175 1.94/1.50 75.47 Similar to #3998993 with tapered spark plug seat.
336781 1974
1975 454
454 235
215 2.06/1.72 113.06 Used for all 1974 and early 1975. Replace by #346236 mid-year 1975.
346236 1975 454 215 2.06/1.72 113.06 Replaced #336781 mid-year 1975.
* The 1973 454 Corvette engine was rated at 270hp. Since this head has the same intake/exhaust and cc volume, it's not known why it is listed at 245hp for 1973.

** The L79 327/350 engine was never available in the Chevelle lineup in 1966; this cylinder head was used on the 1966 L79/350 in the Chevy II/Nova and Corvette.

3872702_396_oval_head.jpg

1966 Oval port head; notice tapped bosses for spark plug shields.

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The top head is the 'lower horsepower' version (300hp and under) used on 67-68 327 applications with 1.94 intake and 1.50 exhaust while the bottom head is the performance version (325hp and higher) used on 67-68 327 applications with 2.02 intake and 1.74 exhaust. These happen to be casting #3917291 with 63.305 and 63.995 cc combustion chambers respectively. Other 'pairs' of 327 heads 1.94 vs. 2.02 intake valve size and different combustion chamber sizes are found in other years with casting numbers 3782461 (64-66 model years) and 3890462 (66-67 model years).
RELATED INFO
http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/block-prep.125/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...k-after-a-cam-lobe-rod-or-bearings-fail.2919/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...g-and-installing-connecting-rods-pistons.247/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...tion-of-crank-durring-short-blk-assembly.852/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/tips-on-building-a-383-sbc-stroker.428/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/stroker-tips-by-len-emanuelson.1249/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/parts-prep-cleaning.6255/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/precision-measuring-tools.1390/#post-52466

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/what-con-rods-would-you-buy.942/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...ng-and-basic-piston-ring-info-youll-need.509/

http://www.hotrod.com/how-to/engine/ccrp-1209-eight-budget-sbc-head-shootout/

http://www.superchevy.com/how-to/engines-drivetrain/sucp-0611-small-block-bolt-on-tests/

http://purplesagetradingpost.com/sumner/techinfo/heads1.html

http://users.erols.com/srweiss/tablehdc.htm



Look over the flow numbers very carefully.
Compare the flow at the lift matching your camshaft.

Some heads flow more at .500" compared to another head, but may flow less at .600"

DO NOT choose a head with larger ports than you need.

Horsepower is a function of RPM.
As such big horsepower numbers require high port flow.
If you are building torque for a street performance vehicle using overly large ports will result in reduced torque, poor acceleration.
This is because airflow through the port will be slower than desired.
The engine will come alive above 3500rpm, but if you are not revving it pass 6000 you will not realize the full potential of the ports.
Using a larger port works best with long duration and high lift camshaft and the use of a high speed torque converter.

Typically 180cc is considered as large as you would want for the average high performance street engine below 390cid.
A 400 to 420cid may work well with 200cc.
However aluminums heads such as the Air Flow Research street performance, Canfield and TrickFlow Twist Wedge heads all work very well with 195cc ports.
This is consider the result of more effective port design.
You will notice a larger port does not necessarily flow more.

While I do not attempt to favor one head manufacture of another,
AFR heads are consider by many to best the best performing overall.
They cost just a little more and until they get the new production shop up and running at full capacity, a set of Chevrolet heads must be order anywhere from 6 to 10 weeks in advance.

Flowing is a long list of heads you can compare. Look very carefully at the numbers and comments.
I will be more than glad to help you choice a pair of heads for your engine.

When trying to choose between an iron or aluminum head, consider the fact that aluminum dissipates head more quickly than iron. Retaining heat in the combustion chamber produces more power.
As a result the compress ratio needs to be high in an aluminum head to produce the same power output as an iron heads.
However, an aluminum head will allow you to raise the compression more than just the compensation requirement before pre-ignition or detonation (pinging) becomes a problem.
The result is additional horsepower and torque.

Maximum compression rations will vary due to attitude, octane rating of premium gasoline where you live, the camshaft duration and final drive ratio.
Building a motor with too high of a compression ratio will result in pinging which prevents further power increase and will over time pound out rod bearings and break ring lands. In extreme situation you may pound a hole through the top of the piston.
Running a compression ration .2 to .4 below the maximum recommended compression ratio for your application will only cost you 5 to 10 horsepower, but buy to a much longer running engine.

In studying head flow numbers keep in mind that they are only a guide. High flow numbers don't always equal more horsepower, and more horsepower doesn't always equal faster acceleration. It can be frustrating to choose the best head and the best camshaft for an application. So many choose, and all manufacturers cliam their product is the best. Dyno or track testing is the only real way to know for sure, but who can afford to do all that testing. I look to my experience the experiences of other engine builders, and magazine test articles to help, but that's all they are a help, until the engine is run, we all have to wait and see.

One last note. If you must pass a smog check your choices will be limited.
Some Edelbrock and TrickFlow heads are 50 State legal, carrying a CARB number.

Over the last few years coatings have become increasing popular. this is due to the fact that a coating can reflect heat back into the expanding gases during the power stroke.
This not only produces more power but will allow a higher compression ratio before detonation occurs.
Coating a piston cost about $20 to $25 each, but for the full effect to be realize you should also coat the combustion chamber and valves.
As a result of these added cost, this process is considered a premium for engine builds with a higher budget.

I can supply Mahle pistons for some applications (350s and 383s and some Ford engines) for about $550.


These pistons are very strong forging, come fully coated, are some of the lightest weight pistons available and have come unique narrow rings for less drag and more horsepower included in the purchase.
Ask for details.

The following is a reprint fro Chevy High Performance Magazine.



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Intake Port cc & CFM @. 500" Lift

Chevrolet Production 441 Iron Head 155/201

h441.jpg
The 882 head may have out-flowed this head but with the addition of larger 2.02-inch intake valves and some decent pocket port work these heads will out flow the 882’s. Keep in mind that with a small 155cc port volume these heads are great for making torque.

_______________________________________________________________

Chevrolet Production Iron 882 Head 151/205

h882.jpg
This head had the smallest port size of all the heads we tested. A set of 2.02/1.60-inch valves can be swapped in but be aware that without blending in the short side radius, the results usually find lost airflow.

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Chevrolet Production 462 Iron Head 156/212

h462.jpg
This head was a small chamber head used on 327ci motors until the end of 1968. The flow can be improved a little with larger valves and port work but the additional cost of this is impractical in comparison to what you can by some other aftermarket casting for.

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Chevrolet Production Vortec Iron Head 885 170/239

hvortec.jpg
This head can be seen as a sleeper when compared to other GM production heads. It outflows the LT-1 aluminum Corvette head on the intake side, plus its mid lift numbers are very impressive. This head is perfect when iron heads are required. GM designed this head and put it on trucks as well as on the later Impala SS but with a different intake bolt pattern. As for production pieces these are one of our favorites.

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Chevrolet Production L98 TPI Aluminum Head 163/196


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This aluminum head was used on the Corvette TPI engines from the mid-Eighties until the LT-1 1992 motors were introduced. The 882-iron head out-flowed this head across the board. This piece is not our first choice for a performance head considering that the largest valve this head fits is a 2.00/1.55-inch combination and it has a 58cc chamber.

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Chevrolet Production GM LT1 372 Aluminum Head 170/214

hLT1.jpg
The LT-1 head was the next generation head developed for the small blocks after the L98 head. This head uses a reverse-cooling system, which means it can not be swapped onto older blocks. The 0.400-inch airflow numbers are great and with some port work, the addition of 2.00/1.55-inch valves can really wake these heads up.

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Chevrolet Production LT4 Aluminum Head
195/250

hLT4.jpg
The LT-4 is substantially different from the LT-1 casting, and the flow numbers explain why. The larger intake ports are definitely a contributing factor. For a production head these babies put up some pretty good flow numbers. Remember, like the LT-1 the LT-4 can only be used on a reverse cooling system block.
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Chevrolet LS1 Aluminum Head 204/240


hLS1.jpg
GM won’t be left out of category 3 with these heads. This head has great 0.400-inch lift numbers as well as a good E/I ratio. They also feature a more flat valve angle (15 degrees) in order to promote a better combustion chamber that’s shaped like a kidney to help direct combustion and reduce possible detonation. Remember that this head will not interchange with pre-‘93 small-block heads.



_______________________________________________________________



AirFlow Research 180 Aluminum Head 181/250
hAFR%20180.jpg
This head is the smallest of AFR’s line. It is intended for engines up to 350ci. The flow numbers are especially impressive on the exhaust side of this head, leading us to believe that a single pattern cam may be the best choice here. The E/I relationship is outstanding with and 84%, almost higher than any other head in this category.

_______________________________________________________________
AirFlow Research 190 Aluminum Head 191/262


hafr%20190.jpg
This head has the best flow numbers of all the category 2 heads. Offering great flow throughout the entire lift range you can see this head doesn’t just put up one big number at maximum lift. If you’re looking for great flow from a mid-sized cylinder head this is definitely one of the top contenders.

_______________________________________________________________

AirFlow Research 210 Aluminum Head 215/271
hAFR%20210.jpg
Here is an extraordinary head. It has larger intake ports but with 240cfm at 0.400-inches of lift who cares? The E/I ratio is an incredible 75% making it hard to find anything wrong with these heads. This head may be a little much for a mouse motor but it is perfect for a big mouse somewhere in the 383 inch range up.
_______________________________________________________________
Brodix-8 Pro Aluminum 181/254


hbrodix.jpg
This head features larger 2.08/1.60-inch valves combined with a 181cc-intake port. With smaller intake port this head flows outstanding at 220cfm by 0.400-inches of lift and even better by 0.500-inches. Combined with a mid-sized port this, this is an outstanding choice for a strong 350ci or 383ci motor.

_______________________________________________________________

Brodix Track 1 Aluminum Head 216/246

hbrodixt1.jpg
The Track 1 head may be down on the numbers at 0.400-inch lift but it’s really competitive once it sees the 0.500-inch lift point. Add some short-side radius work and wow you’ve got a killer head. If you have a set of these heads there’s definite potential.

_______________________________________________________________

Brodix -11X 220 Aluminum Head 216/246

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Brodix offers this large-port, 23-degree valve angle, small-block head as one of its largest ports in the stock valve-angle lineup. The low lift numbers are down a bit but in comparison to some of the others once the lift numbers increase you can see there is some serious airflow. These come available with minor or major port work depending on how you order them.

_______________________________________________________________

Brodix -1X Aluminum Head 223/278

hbrodix223.jpg
The Brodix -1x heads feature a 40/60 valve spacing, meaning the centerline of each valve has been moved away from its standard location to accommodate a larger diameter valve and move both valves away from chamber walls for unshrouding. This means special offset shaft mounted rockers are needed and available from Brodix. It seems like a lot of R & D went into these bad boys and the numbers show it.

_______________________________________________________________

Canfield Aluminum Head 195/258

hcanfield%20194.jpg
Canfield only sells this head with valves. One area to pay close attention to is the excellent low and mid-lift numbers. This head actually out-flows the Category 3 heads from 0.050- through 0.400-inches of lift.

_______________________________________________________________

Canfield 220 Aluminum Head 223/260

hcanfield220.jpg
This race oriented small-block head requires the use of 0.150-inch offset intake rocker arm to accommodate the repositioned intake valve. The idea of spreading the valves apart is to increase valve diameter and improve flow. This head has 2.08/1.60-inch valves and probably works best on larger displacement mouse motors around 383-plus cubic inches.

_______________________________________________________________

Dart Iron Eagle S/S 165/210

hdartss.jpg
Dart offers everything from street performance heads to full race heads. This Iron Eagle piece is the smallest head at 165cc port volume but its just what you need when building a stout street motor that sees occasional strip time. Compare its flow numbers to others and you can be the judge on this one.

_______________________________________________________________
Dart Iron Eagle 180 174/210


Dart%20180%20Heads.bmp
This head is also a big brother but to the 165cc Dart Iron Eagle head. The 180cc head reveals a respectable intake flow curve and an outstanding exhaust port. This head comes in many different combinations. You can order the head with straight or angle plugs, a 64cc or 72cc chamber, and in iron or aluminum. You will notice this head has better mid lift intake flow figures but the same full lift numbers as the 165cc heads, however the exhaust side flows better.

_______________________________________________________________

Dart Iron Eagle 220 220/258

hdart%20conq.jpg
The Dart Iron Eagle head here offers a budget alternative to the aluminum Conquest head. With similar flow numbers the only real big difference here is iron verse aluminum and cost. This head is offered in 200 or 220cc intake ports and with 2.02 or 2.05-inch intake valves.

_______________________________________________________________

Dart Conquest Iron 220 220/252

hdart220.jpg
This head really likes to flow at lifts above 0.500-inches. The E/I ratio at 0.400-inch is a very good 72% and 68% at 0.500-inches. This head comes machined for both center-bolt and perimeter-style valve covers. The Conquest can be optioned with 200 or 220cc intake ports, valves up to 2.08/1.60, and in 64 or 72cc chamber sizes.

_______________________________________________________________
Dart Pro 1 Aluminum 215 221/253


hdartpro1.jpg
This is perhaps one of the most versatile heads out there. While the low lift numbers don’t stand out, the higher lift numbers are on par with the rest of the heads on the market. This head is definitely best on high winding motors where consistent rpm is what wins a race.

_______________________________________________________________

Dart Iron Eagle 230 229/254

hdart229.jpg
This is the largest of the Dart Iron Eagle series heads. They perform best on motors above 400ci-inches and with cam lifts above 0.500-inches lift. The E/I ratio is acceptable and the castings are made of good quality. These heads flow well and do not really require too much handwork to improve airflow.

_______________________________________________________________
Edelbrock Performer Aluminum 166/235


hedel%20perf.jpg
This head may first appear subtle in comparison to its flow numbers but don’t be fooled. The 166cc port makes for great torque and the E/I flow relationship is good. This head is perfect for a street/strip application. In our own personal experience we had a 355ci motor with 9:1 compression, a streetable Comp Cam (DEH 275), and an Edelbrock RPM manifold. With this combination we were able to achieve 420hp at 6,000rpm and 440 lb-ft of torque at 4,250 rpm.

_______________________________________________________________
Edelbrock Performer RPM Aluminum 170/237


hedelRPM.jpg
The Edelbrock RPM head is the big brother to the Performer version. It still retains a small 170cc intake port volume providing great torque down low where it’s needed. The E/I percentage is no less than 70% with much higher numbers in the low-lift areas. This head is a step up from the Performer, flowing more air, which in return will make more power on the top end.

_______________________________________________________________
Edelbrock E-TEC 170 Vortec Aluminum 170/240
hetec.jpg
With the tremendous popularity of GM’s Vortec head, Edelbrock decided to design a head around the GM casting. This head features a 1.94/1.55-inch valve combination, and different port configuration allowing it to out perform the stock production Vortec head. However, the E-TEC heads are aluminum typically costing more than the production GM heads.

_______________________________________________________________
Edelbrock E-TEC Vortec 200/252

hetec%20200.jpg
This head is the next step up from the smaller 170 E-TEC. It features larger valves and bigger intake ports. However, a Vortec style intake manifold must be matched with these heads. Up to 0.500-inches these heads don’t really out flow the stock Vortecs. On the other hand their exhaust ports are extremely efficient which help improve performance throughout the entire power curve. They are also aluminum, which can allow more compression with out detonation.

_______________________________________________________________

Edelbrock Victor Jr. Aluminum 219/255

hedel210.jpg
This is an impressive head. It features a kidney shaped combustion chamber keeping the combustion moving, the flow is awesome from 0.400-inches all the way up to our tested 0.700-inches, and the E/I ratio is an amazing 81%. We see a head that flows some serious air and likes high lift roller cams.

_______________________________________________________________

Holley 300-570 Aluminum 172/232

hholley.jpg
This head from Holley comes with angled plugs and 69cc chambers, which are a big change from the stock 76cc smog chambers. The combustion chamber is typical of a late model design with a kidney shape that increases combustion turbulence lessening the possibility of detonation.

_______________________________________________________________

Holley SysteMAX Aluminum 186/242

hholley186.jpg
This head is very similar to the -8 Brodix but it appears to flow a little better on the exhaust side. Again this head looks like it offers great torque potential with its well-proportioned 186cc-intake runner

_______________________________________________________________

Pro Action Iron 220 225/239

hprotop1.jpg
These heads can be purchased in many different intake port sizes. They are available with 180, 200, 220, and 235cc intake ports. They also feature a 64cc and 72cc chamber for your desired compression levels.

_______________________________________________________________

Pro Action Iron 235 Iron 245/242

hpro235.jpg
These are the largest of the Pro Action lineup. The heads are advertised as 235cc intake ports but in our testing we found them to be 245cc’s. These heads are definitely for use on big mouse motors that like to see some rpm.

_______________________________________________________________

Trick Flow Specialties 195 195/250
hTF%20196.jpg
These heads may not flow the biggest numbers but there should be little question regarding their performance that they can perform well. In CHP’s Nov. ’99 issue they were bolted on a mild 383ci motor and were able to pump up peak engine power by 15.5%. These heads offer some of the best power for the dollar on a mild small Chevy.

_______________________________________________________________

TFS Twisted Wedge 200/254

htfs%202.jpg
In an attempt to be different for the better, this TSF twisted Wedge head changed the valve angles from 23 degrees to 13 degrees. The really big difference here is what the exhaust side of this head is capable of. Only one other head (AFR 210) was even close on the exhaust side. The E/I was also a very respectable 77%. This head really can wake up your engine.

_______________________________________________________________

World Products Iron S/R Torquer 170/225

hworldsr.jpg
This head is very similar to the 882 head tested earlier. The valves are larger and the flow numbers at 0.400-inch lift are almost identical. At 0.500-inch lift the flow is up 15% over the 882 head. With prices to rebuild stock heads increasing all the time these heads would probably be one of your better investments.

obviously the total combo needs to be well thought through and matched to a drive train gearing that matches the intended use,
and Id point out this may not be related to the engine in this thread, but you do have options in selecting heads, intakes engine displacement, compresion etc.
. If I was building a serious performance engine application and wanted to go with vortec heads,
I would at least consider a set of the larger 225cc port vortec heads and a decent solid roller cam, some port clean-up work, better valve springs etc.
https://www.summitracing.com/parts/nal-25534446

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...cu-sbc-in-vortec-head-build.12080/#post-57865

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/the-new-215cc-vortec-heads.266/#post-35948

http://www.superchevy.com/how-to/148-0506-gm-bow-tie-vortec-small-block-engine/
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Grumpy

The Grumpy Grease Monkey mechanical engineer.
Staff member
_______________________________________________________________http://purplesagetradingpost.com/sumner/techinfo/heads1.html

https://www.high-performance-engines.com/cylinder-heads-s/173.htm

http://users.erols.com/srweiss/tablehdc.htm
before you spend a good deal of money porting and un-shrouding any iron cylinder heads, keep in mind aluminum heads are easily repaired in a skilled and experienced automotive machine shop thats equipped to do those repairs but damaged iron cylinder heads are either much harder to repair or good door stops
http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/iron-vs-aluminum-heads.389/#post-7266
Intake Port cc & CFM @. 500" Lift

Chevrolet Production 441 Iron Head 155/201

h441.jpg
The 882 head may have out-flowed this head but with the addition of larger 2.02-inch intake valves and some decent pocket port work these heads will out flow the 882’s. Keep in mind that with a small 155cc port volume these heads are great for making torque.

_______________________________________________________________

Chevrolet Production Iron 882 Head 151/205

h882.jpg
This head had the smallest port size of all the heads we tested. A set of 2.02/1.60-inch valves can be swapped in but be aware that without blending in the short side radius, the results usually find lost airflow.

_______________________________________________________________

Chevrolet Production 462 Iron Head 156/212

h462.jpg
This head was a small chamber head used on 327ci motors until the end of 1968. The flow can be improved a little with larger valves and port work but the additional cost of this is impractical in comparison to what you can by some other aftermarket casting for.

_______________________________________________________________

Chevrolet Production Vortec Iron Head 885 170/239

hvortec.jpg
This head can be seen as a sleeper when compared to other GM production heads. It outflows the LT-1 aluminum Corvette head on the intake side, plus its mid lift numbers are very impressive. This head is perfect when iron heads are required. GM designed this head and put it on trucks as well as on the later Impala SS but with a different intake bolt pattern. As for production pieces these are one of our favorites.

_______________________________________________________________
Chevrolet Production L98 TPI Aluminum Head 163/196


hL98.jpg
This aluminum head was used on the Corvette TPI engines from the mid-Eighties until the LT-1 1992 motors were introduced. The 882-iron head out-flowed this head across the board. This piece is not our first choice for a performance head considering that the largest valve this head fits is a 2.00/1.55-inch combination and it has a 58cc chamber.

_______________________________________________________________

Chevrolet Production GM LT1 372 Aluminum Head 170/214

hLT1.jpg
The LT-1 head was the next generation head developed for the small blocks after the L98 head. This head uses a reverse-cooling system, which means it can not be swapped onto older blocks. The 0.400-inch airflow numbers are great and with some port work, the addition of 2.00/1.55-inch valves can really wake these heads up.

_______________________________________________________________
Chevrolet Production LT4 Aluminum Head
195/250

hLT4.jpg
The LT-4 is substantially different from the LT-1 casting, and the flow numbers explain why. The larger intake ports are definitely a contributing factor. For a production head these babies put up some pretty good flow numbers. Remember, like the LT-1 the LT-4 can only be used on a reverse cooling system block.
_______________________________________________________________
Chevrolet LS1 Aluminum Head 204/240


hLS1.jpg
GM won’t be left out of category 3 with these heads. This head has great 0.400-inch lift numbers as well as a good E/I ratio. They also feature a more flat valve angle (15 degrees) in order to promote a better combustion chamber that’s shaped like a kidney to help direct combustion and reduce possible detonation. Remember that this head will not interchange with pre-‘93 small-block heads.



_______________________________________________________________

AirFlow Research 180 Aluminum Head 181/250
hAFR%20180.jpg
This head is the smallest of AFR’s line. It is intended for engines up to 350ci. The flow numbers are especially impressive on the exhaust side of this head, leading us to believe that a single pattern cam may be the best choice here. The E/I relationship is outstanding with and 84%, almost higher than any other head in this category.

_______________________________________________________________
AirFlow Research 190 Aluminum Head 191/262


hafr%20190.jpg
This head has the best flow numbers of all the category 2 heads. Offering great flow throughout the entire lift range you can see this head doesn’t just put up one big number at maximum lift. If you’re looking for great flow from a mid-sized cylinder head this is definitely one of the top contenders.

_______________________________________________________________

AirFlow Research 210 Aluminum Head 215/271
hAFR%20210.jpg
Here is an extraordinary head
. It has larger intake ports but with 240cfm at 0.400-inches of lift who cares? The E/I ratio is an incredible 75% making it hard to find anything wrong with these heads. This head may be a little much for a mouse motor but it is perfect for a big mouse somewhere in the 383 inch range up.
_______________________________________________________________
Brodix-8 Pro Aluminum 181/254


hbrodix.jpg
This head features larger 2.08/1.60-inch valves combined with a 181cc-intake port. With smaller intake port this head flows outstanding at 220cfm by 0.400-inches of lift and even better by 0.500-inches. Combined with a mid-sized port this, this is an outstanding choice for a strong 350ci or 383ci motor.

_______________________________________________________________


Brodix Track 1 Aluminum Head 216/246

hbrodixt1.jpg
The Track 1 head may be down on the numbers at 0.400-inch lift but it’s really competitive once it sees the 0.500-inch lift point. Add some short-side radius work and wow you’ve got a killer head. If you have a set of these heads there’s definite potential.

_______________________________________________________________

Brodix -11X 220 Aluminum Head 216/246

hbrodixt1.jpg
Brodix offers this large-port, 23-degree valve angle, small-block head as one of its largest ports in the stock valve-angle lineup. The low lift numbers are down a bit but in comparison to some of the others once the lift numbers increase you can see there is some serious airflow. These come available with minor or major port work depending on how you order them.

_______________________________________________________________


Brodix -1X Aluminum Head 223/278

hbrodix223.jpg
The Brodix -1x heads feature a 40/60 valve spacing, meaning the centerline of each valve has been moved away from its standard location to accommodate a larger diameter valve and move both valves away from chamber walls for unshrouding. This means special offset shaft mounted rockers are needed and available from Brodix. It seems like a lot of R & D went into these bad boys and the numbers show it.

_______________________________________________________________

Canfield Aluminum Head 195/258

hcanfield%20194.jpg
Canfield only sells this head with valves. One area to pay close attention to is the excellent low and mid-lift numbers. This head actually out-flows the Category 3 heads from 0.050- through 0.400-inches of lift.

_______________________________________________________________

Canfield 220 Aluminum Head 223/260

hcanfield220.jpg
This race oriented small-block head requires the use of 0.150-inch offset intake rocker arm to accommodate the repositioned intake valve. The idea of spreading the valves apart is to increase valve diameter and improve flow. This head has 2.08/1.60-inch valves and probably works best on larger displacement mouse motors around 383-plus cubic inches.

_______________________________________________________________

Dart Iron Eagle S/S 165/210

hdartss.jpg
Dart offers everything from street performance heads to full race heads. This Iron Eagle piece is the smallest head at 165cc port volume but its just what you need when building a stout street motor that sees occasional strip time. Compare its flow numbers to others and you can be the judge on this one.

_______________________________________________________________
Dart Iron Eagle 180 174/210


Dart%20180%20Heads.bmp
This head is also a big brother but to the 165cc Dart Iron Eagle head. The 180cc head reveals a respectable intake flow curve and an outstanding exhaust port. This head comes in many different combinations. You can order the head with straight or angle plugs, a 64cc or 72cc chamber, and in iron or aluminum. You will notice this head has better mid lift intake flow figures but the same full lift numbers as the 165cc heads, however the exhaust side flows better.

_______________________________________________________________

Dart Iron Eagle 220 220/258

hdart%20conq.jpg
The Dart Iron Eagle head here offers a budget alternative to the aluminum Conquest head. With similar flow numbers the only real big difference here is iron verse aluminum and cost. This head is offered in 200 or 220cc intake ports and with 2.02 or 2.05-inch intake valves.

_______________________________________________________________

Dart Conquest Iron 220 220/252

hdart220.jpg
This head really likes to flow at lifts above 0.500-inches. The E/I ratio at 0.400-inch is a very good 72% and 68% at 0.500-inches. This head comes machined for both center-bolt and perimeter-style valve covers. The Conquest can be optioned with 200 or 220cc intake ports, valves up to 2.08/1.60, and in 64 or 72cc chamber sizes.

_______________________________________________________________
Dart Pro 1 Aluminum 215 221/253


hdartpro1.jpg
This is perhaps one of the most versatile heads out there. While the low lift numbers don’t stand out, the higher lift numbers are on par with the rest of the heads on the market. This head is definitely best on high winding motors where consistent rpm is what wins a race.

_______________________________________________________________

Dart Iron Eagle 230 229/254

hdart229.jpg
This is the largest of the Dart Iron Eagle series heads. They perform best on motors above 400ci-inches and with cam lifts above 0.500-inches lift. The E/I ratio is acceptable and the castings are made of good quality. These heads flow well and do not really require too much handwork to improve airflow.

_______________________________________________________________
Edelbrock Performer Aluminum 166/235


hedel%20perf.jpg
This head may first appear subtle in comparison to its flow numbers but don’t be fooled. The 166cc port makes for great torque and the E/I flow relationship is good. This head is perfect for a street/strip application. In our own personal experience we had a 355ci motor with 9:1 compression, a streetable Comp Cam (DEH 275), and an Edelbrock RPM manifold. With this combination we were able to achieve 420hp at 6,000rpm and 440 lb-ft of torque at 4,250 rpm.

_______________________________________________________________
Edelbrock Performer RPM Aluminum 170/237


hedelRPM.jpg
The Edelbrock RPM head is the big brother to the Performer version. It still retains a small 170cc intake port volume providing great torque down low where it’s needed. The E/I percentage is no less than 70% with much higher numbers in the low-lift areas. This head is a step up from the Performer, flowing more air, which in return will make more power on the top end.

_______________________________________________________________
Edelbrock E-TEC 170 Vortec Aluminum 170/240
hetec.jpg
With the tremendous popularity of GM’s Vortec head, Edelbrock decided to design a head around the GM casting. This head features a 1.94/1.55-inch valve combination, and different port configuration allowing it to out perform the stock production Vortec head. However, the E-TEC heads are aluminum typically costing more than the production GM heads.

_______________________________________________________________

Edelbrock E-TEC Vortec 200/252


hetec%20200.jpg
This head is the next step up from the smaller 170 E-TEC. It features larger valves and bigger intake ports. However, a Vortec style intake manifold must be matched with these heads. Up to 0.500-inches these heads don’t really out flow the stock Vortecs. On the other hand their exhaust ports are extremely efficient which help improve performance throughout the entire power curve. They are also aluminum, which can allow more compression with out detonation.

_______________________________________________________________


Edelbrock Victor Jr. Aluminum 219/255

hedel210.jpg
This is an impressive head. It features a kidney shaped combustion chamber keeping the combustion moving, the flow is awesome from 0.400-inches all the way up to our tested 0.700-inches, and the E/I ratio is an amazing 81%. We see a head that flows some serious air and likes high lift roller cams.

_______________________________________________________________

Holley 300-570 Aluminum 172/232

hholley.jpg
This head from Holley comes with angled plugs and 69cc chambers, which are a big change from the stock 76cc smog chambers. The combustion chamber is typical of a late model design with a kidney shape that increases combustion turbulence lessening the possibility of detonation.

_______________________________________________________________

Holley SysteMAX Aluminum 186/242

hholley186.jpg
This head is very similar to the -8 Brodix but it appears to flow a little better on the exhaust side. Again this head looks like it offers great torque potential with its well-proportioned 186cc-intake runner

_______________________________________________________________

Pro Action Iron 220 225/239

hprotop1.jpg
These heads can be purchased in many different intake port sizes. They are available with 180, 200, 220, and 235cc intake ports. They also feature a 64cc and 72cc chamber for your desired compression levels.

_______________________________________________________________

Pro Action Iron 235 Iron 245/242

hpro235.jpg
These are the largest of the Pro Action lineup. The heads are advertised as 235cc intake ports but in our testing we found them to be 245cc’s. These heads are definitely for use on big mouse motors that like to see some rpm.

_______________________________________________________________

Trick Flow Specialties 195 195/250
hTF%20196.jpg
These heads may not flow the biggest numbers but there should be little question regarding their performance that they can perform well. In CHP’s Nov. ’99 issue they were bolted on a mild 383ci motor and were able to pump up peak engine power by 15.5%. These heads offer some of the best power for the dollar on a mild small Chevy.

_______________________________________________________________

TFS Twisted Wedge 200/254

htfs%202.jpg
In an attempt to be different for the better, this TSF twisted Wedge head changed the valve angles from 23 degrees to 13 degrees. The really big difference here is what the exhaust side of this head is capable of. Only one other head (AFR 210) was even close on the exhaust side. The E/I was also a very respectable 77%. This head really can wake up your engine.especially with a nitrous cam and wet nitrous plate

_______________________________________________________________

World Products Iron S/R Torquer 170/225

hworldsr.jpg
This head is very similar to the 882 head tested earlier. The valves are larger and the flow numbers at 0.400-inch lift are almost identical. At 0.500-inch lift the flow is up 15% over the 882 head. With prices to rebuild stock heads increasing all the time these heads would probably be one of your better investments.

Cylinder Head ID

Use these casting numbers to identify the heads you have.

Small Block Casting numbers

Casting Number
CID
Years
Valves
Comments
10065202
350
82-86
1.94/1.50
76cc
10065203
350
82-86
1.94/1.50
76cc
10065204
350
82-86
1.94/1.50
76cc
10065205
305
82-86
1.84/1.50
58cc
10065206
350
82-86
1.94/1.50
76cc
10065207
305
82-86
1.84/1.50
58cc
10088113
350
86-92
1.94/1.50
58cc Corvette Aluminum
10120928
350
87-94
1.94/1.50
76cc
10125320
350
94-96
2.00/1.55
Gen II LT1 cast iron version,
10128374
350
92-97
2.00/1.55
Gen II LT1 53 CC angle plug aluminum
10134363
Bowtie High Port 60 CC 210 ~ 258 CC
10159550
350
87-94
1.94/1.50
76cc
10159551
305
87-94
1.84/1.50
58cc
10159552
350
87-94
1.94/1.50
76cc
10159553
305
87-94
1.84/1.50
58cc
10185040
Splayed vavle head 45 CC angle plug
10205245
350
93
2.00/1.55
Gen II LT1 angle plug aluminum reverse flow cooling 175/68cc ports
10207643
350
94-97
2.00/1.55
Gen II LT1 angle plug aluminum reverse flow cooling 175/68cc ports
10208890
265
94-96
2.00/1.55
Gen II L99 4.3 Liter V-8, cast iron, reverse flow
10215339
346
97
2.00/1.55
Gen III LS1 aluminum 68cc
10239906
305/350
96-up
1.94/1.50
68cc Vortec
12367713
2.00/1.55
GM Fast burn 62 CC 210 CC intake runner angle plug Vortec
12480005
346
0
2.125/1.625
Gen III LS1 "GTZ" aluminum 38cc angle plug
12480011
SB2.2 head 48 ~ 54 CC angle plug 284 CC intake runner Bare heads.
12480034
2.02/1.60
Bowtie Phase III 64cc Angle plug 184 cc intake runner
12506450
350
87-94
1.94/1.50
76cc
12509859
305
87-94
1.84/1.50
58cc
12516852
350
87-94
1.94/1.50
76cc
12551561
350
96
2.00/1.55
Gen II LT1 angle plug aluminum reverse flow cooling
12552520
305
97-99
1.84/1.5
Vortec Truck L-35
12554290
350
94-96
2.00/1.55
Gen II LT1 cast iron version
12555690
350
96
2.00/1.55
Gen II LT-4 55 CC 195 CC intake runner Angle Plug
12555690
350
96
2.00/1.55
Gen II LT-4 55 CC 195 CC intake runner Angle Plug
12556743
325
99 & UP
2.00/1.55
Gen III 5.3L aluminum truck and van
12558059
305
97
1.84/1.5
L-35 Vortec truck
12558062
350
98
1.94/1.5
L-31 Vortec truck 64cc chambers 170cc intake port
12558062
305/350
96-up
1.94/1.50
68cc Vortec
12558806
346
97-98
2.00/1.55
Gen III LS1 aluminum 68cc
12559853
346
99 & UP
2.00/1.55
Gen III LS1 aluminum 68cc
12559895
325
00 & UP
2.00/1.55
Gen III 5.3L aluminum
12564241
346
00 & UP
2.00/1.55
Gen III LS1 aluminum 68cc
12564243
346
2
2.00/1.55
Gen III LS6 aluminum 68cc
12564243
346
2.00/1.55
Gen III LS-6 vette head 65 CC
14008856
267
79-81
1.71/1.50
14010201
305
82-85
1.84/1.50
58cc
14011034
350
80-up
2.02/1.60
64cc Bowtie
14011049
350
82-up
2.02/1.60
64cc Bowtie Aluminum
14014415
267/305
80-85
1.71/1.50
64cc Crack prone
14014416
267/305/350
80-86
1.84/1.50
64cc Crack prone
14019821
350
80-86
1.84/1.50
76cc
14019924
267
79-81
1.71/1.50
14019926
305
80-86
1.84/1.50
14020516
305/350
80-86
1.84/1.50
14020517
350
80-86
1.84/1.50
76cc
14020555
305
81
14020556
350
81
14022206
350
80
1.94/1.50
76cc
14022301
305
80-86
1.84/1.50
58cc
14022601
267/305
79-86
1.72/1.50 1.84/1.50
58cc
14022801
305
80-86
1.72/1.50
58cc
14034806
267
78-82
1.72/1.50
14034807
305
78-82
1.72/1.50
14034808
350
80-86
1.84/1.50
76cc
14034810
350
80-86
14034811
350
80-86
14039121
305
81-86
14039122
305
81-86
14071114
350
80-86
14075381
350
80-86
14079261
350
82-85
14085844
350
80-86
14089119
350
80-86
14096217
350
90-up
1.94/1.50
64cc Crate heads
14101081
305
87-94
1.84/1.50
58cc
14101083
350
88-94
1.94/1.50
64 cc
14102187
305
87-95
1.84/1.50
58cc
14102191
305/350
87-95
1.84/1.50
14102193
305/350
87-95
1.84/1.50
24502559
96-97
Bowtie SB2 1st design"mirror ports" aluminum
25534351C
2.00/1.55
Vortec Bowtie 65 CC 175 cc intake runner
25534371C
2.00/1.55
Vortec Bowtie 65 CC 206 cc intake runner
3238882
350
68-69
1.94/1.50
76cc
3297185
307/327/350
57-67
1.72/1.50
330545
350/400
71-75
2.02/1.60
76cc
330862
400
71-73
1.94/1.50
333881
350
71-76
2.02/1.60
76cc
333882
350/400
70-80
1.94/1.50
76cc
340292
350
73-80
2.02/1.60
64cc Angle plugs turbo' head No heat riser
354434
262/305
75-80
1.72/1.50
60cc
358741
262/305
71--79
1.72/1.50
359944
350
71-79
1.94/1.50
76cc
3636839
265
55
1.72/1.50
3703523
265
55
1.72/1.50
195HP
3713358
265
55-56
1.72/1.50
3713569
265
55-56
1.72/1.50
3725306
265
56
1.72/1.50
210HP Corvette
3731262
265
56
1.72/1.50
Dual Quad Corvette
3731539
283
57-66
1.72/1.50
283HP Corvette
3731544
265/283
55-61
1.72/1.50
Dual Quad Corvette
3731554
265/283
55-63
1.72/1.50
3731556
283
57
1.72/1.50
3731762
265
56
1.72/1.50
Dual Quad Corvette
3737775
283/327
62-67
1.72/1.50
3740997
283
57
1.72/1.50
Dual Quad FI & 4-brl 220-270HP
3743056
283
58
1.72/1.50
3743096
327
62-67
1.72/1.50
3747363
265
57-62
1.72/1.50
3748056
327
62-67
1.72/1.50
3748720
283
57-58
1.72/1.50
Dual Quad FI & 4-brl Corvette
3748770
283
55-62
1.72/1.50
Dual Quad FI & 4-brl Corvette
3748772
283
57-62
1.72/1.50
Dual Quad FI & 4-brl Corvette
3755537
283
57-62
1.72/1.50
3755538
283
59
1.72/1.50
250-290HP FI Corvette
3755539
283
58-62
1.72/1.50
3755549
283
57-62
1.72/1.50
3755550
283
57-62
1.72/1.50
Dual Quad FI & 4-brl Corvette
3755585
327
62-67
1.72/1.50
3755896
283
62-64
1.72/1.50
3760116
283
59
1.72/1.50
Dual Quad FI & 4-brl Corvette
376445
350
80-84
1.72/1.50
376450
262/305
75-76
1.72/1.50
376495
350
Jun-79
1.94/1.50
76cc
3767460
265/283/327
55-67
1.72/1.50
Car & Truck Corvette
3767462
327
62-67
1.72/1.50
3767465
283
60-61
1.72/1.50
Dual Quad FI & 4-brl Corvette
3767754
283
60-61
1.72/1.50
3767792
283
60-67
1.72/1.50
3770126
327/350
67-70
1.94/1.50
3773012
265
55
1.72/1.50
3774634
327
64-67
1.72/1.50
3774682
283/327
60-67
1.72/1.50
3774684
283/327
57-67
1.72/1.50
3774690
283
58
1.72/1.50
FI Corvette
3774692
283
58-64
1.72/1.50
Dual Quad FI & 4-brl Corvette
3782461
302/327/350
61-70
1.94/1.50
Dual Quad FI & 4-brl Corvette 2.02/1.60 Doubble humps 64cc
3782462
327
67
1.94/1.50
Corvette 2.02/1.60
3792563
327
65-67
3795896
283/307/327
58-72
1.72/1.50
60cc
3796896
283
64-67
1.72/1.50
60cc Chevy II
3798996
327
63-67
3814462
350
67
1.94/1.50
3814480
283/327
60-67
1.72/1.50
3814482
327
62-67
1.72/1.50
3817680
283
59
1.72/1.50
FI 4-brl
3817681
327
62-67
1.72/1.50
3817682
283
61-62
1.72/1.50
3836839
265
55
1.72/1.50
3836842
283/327
57-67
1.72/1.50
3836924
283
63-64
1.72/1.50
3836942
283
58-62
1.72/1.50
3837063
283
58-62
1.72/1.50
3837064
265/283
56-62
1.72/1.50
3837065
265
55-56
1.72/1.50
3837775
283/327
62-67
1.72/1.50
383882
400
71-73
3848720
283
57-58
1.72/1.50
3849820
327
65
1.72/1.50
3854520
283/327
62-67
1.72/1.50
3867802
283
57-60
1.72/1.50
FI Corvette
3873064
265
56-57
1.72/1.50
3876487
350
71-73
1.94/1.50
76cc
3876775
283/327
57-67
1.72/1.50
76cc
3878775
327
64-67
1.72/1.50
3884520
283/327
60-67
1.72/1.50
60cc
3890462
302/327/350
62-68
1.94/1.50 2.02/1.60
64cc Doubble humps
3891462
302/327/350
62-67
1.94/1.50 2.02/1.60
64cc
3891492
327
64-67
1.94/1.50
3911011
327
68
3911032
307/327
68-70
1.72/1.50
70cc
3912264
283
58-62
1.72/1.50
3912265
283
63-64
1.72/1.50
3912291
302/327/350
68-70
1.94/1.50 2.02/1.60
64ccDoubble humps
3912311
350
67
1.94/1.50
3912313
327
65-73
1.72/1.50
3917264
302
67
2.02/1.60
64cc Z-28
3917290
327
68-70
1.72/1.50
3917291
302/327/350
62-69
1.94/1.50 2.02/1.60
64cc Doubble humps
3917292
327
67-68
1.94/1.50
3917293
307/327
68-69
1.72/1.50
76cc
3921175
327
66
1.94/1.50
3923441
350
67-76
1.94/1.50
76cc
3927185
307/327/350
68-79
1.72/1.50
70cc
3927186
302/327/350
68-72
1.94/1.50 2.02/1.60
64cc Doubble humps Bolt holes
3927187
302/350
69-70
2.02/1.60
64cc Corvette
3927188
307/327/350
69
1.72/1.50
76cc
3928454
307
68
1.72/1.50
3928455
302/327
68
2.02/1.60
64cc 325 & 350HP
3928494
327
68
2.02/1.60
64cc 350HP 4-brl
3928495
327
68
1.72/1.50
3931633
307
68-73
1.72/1.50
3931635
350
68-76
1.94/1.50
76cc
3931637
327
68-69
3931638
327
68
1.72/1.50
3931639
302
68
2.02/1.60
64cc
3932441
327/350
67-79
1.94/1.50
76cc
3932454
307/350
68-799
1.72/1.50
76cc
3933148
350
68-73
76cc
3941174
327
68
1.72/1.50
3946812
350
69
1.72/1.50
3946813
350
69-79
76cc
3947014
350
68-70
3947040
302/327/350
68-70
1.94/1.50 2.02/1.60
64cc
3947041
302/327/350
68-79
1.94/1.50 2.02/1.60
64cc
3951598
400
70-71
1.94/1.50
76cc
3961598
400
70-76
1.94/1.50
76cc
3964286
350
68-77
1.94/1.50
76cc
3970126
327/350
67-79
1.72/1.50
3973195
400
71-73
1.94/1.50
76cc
3973414
327/350
64-70
2.02/1.60
64cc Z-28 LT-1 corvette
3973487
350
68-79
1.94/1.50 2.02/1.60
76cc
3973487X
350
68-73
1.94/1.50 2.02/1.60
76cc X cast 10cc's
3973493
400
70-76
1.94/1.50
76cc
3986316
350
71-72
2.02/1.60
76cc
3986330
350
69-79
1.94/1.50
76cc
3986339
307/350
68-79
1.72/1.50
76cc
3986388
350
68-79
1.72/1.50
76cc
3990941
307/350
68-82
3991492
327/350
68-73
1.94/1.50 2.02/1.60
64cc Angle plug
399380
400
70-73
76cc
3997417
307
71
1.72/1.50
3998916
350/400
72-75
2.02/1.60
76cc
3998920
350
72-75
1.94/1.50
76cc
3998991
307/350
68-79
1.72/1.50
76cc
3998993
307/350
68-79
1.71/1.50 1.94/1.50
76cc
3998997
350/400
71-73
1.94/1.50
76cc
426424
305/350/400
72-82
1.72/1.50
458624
350
69-84
1.94/1.50
76cc
460703
350
78-80
1.94/1.50
76cc
462614
305/350
77-79
1.72/1.50
462624
350
76-87
1.94/1.50 2.02/1.60
76cc Crack prone
464033
350
76-86
1.94/1.50
76cc
464036
350
76-86
1.94/1.50
76cc
468642
350/400
75-84
1.72/1.50
471513
267
79-81
1.72/1.50
472424
305
76-79
1.72/1.50
474213
305
78-82
1.72/1.50
474214
350
78-82
1.94/1.50
76cc
475590
400
78-82
1.94/1.50
76cc
517513
267
79-81
1.72/1.50
6259515
350
73
6260855
350
73-75
1.94/1.50
76cc
6260856
350
73-76
1.94/1.50
76cc
6272070
350
73
10045427
Pontiac/Chevy Aluminum, 91cc chamber Large Rectangle Port
10049875
Pontiac/Chevy Aluminum Small Rectangle port
10051128
454
90-94
2.19/1.88
72cc Bowtie Aluminum Rectangular port 400cc intake
10052902
427
Oval Port Open chamber
10101136
454
91-94
2.06/1.77
Open chamber Oval port
10101140
366/427
91-01
Oval Port Closed chamber
10114156
454
91-01
Oval Port Open chamber
10121033
454
78-88
2.06/1.77
Open chamber Oval port
10141279
454
96-01
Vortec 7400 100cc chambers Oval Port
10487052
366
77-90
Oval Port Open chamber
12352783
454
79-93
2.06/1.77
Open chamber Oval port
12363391
Oval Port Bowtie Aluminum Signature Series
12363401
Rectangle Port Bowtie Aluminum Signature Series
12558162
496
01 & UP
Gen.VII Vortec 8100 8.1L truck
12560241
454
98-01
Vortec 7400 100cc chambers Oval Port
12562932
454/502
91-95
Oval Port truck crate motor 118cc chambers
12562934
502
00 & UP
GenVI Marine
14011077
454
89-94
2.19/1.88
118cc Replacement Aluminum Rectangular port 295cc intake
14025175
454
83-93
2.06/1.77
Open chamber Oval port
14044861
454
89-94
2.19/1.88
106cc Bowtie Aluminum Rectangular port 380cc intake
14081044
454
86-90
2.06/1.77
Open chamber Oval port
14081045
454
78-87
Oval Port Open chamber
14081052
366/427/454
85-87
Oval Port Open chamber
14092359
427
86-89
2.06/1.77
Open chamber Oval port
14092360
454
85-89
2.06/1.77
Open chamber Oval port
14096188
454
87-94
2.19/1.88
118cc Replacement Rectangular port 325cc intake
14097088
502
89-date
2.19/1.88
118cc Replacement Rectangular port 325cc intake GEN V
14101398
454
86-90
2.06/1.77
Open chamber Oval port
24502585
Olds/Chevy DRCE 2 Pro Stock aluminum
330864
366/427/454
70-81
2.06/1.77
Open chamber Oval port
330865
366/427/454
70-84
2.06/1.77
Open chamber Oval port
330866
366/427
68-78
Oval Port Open chamber
330867
427
68-73
Oval Port Open chamber
336768
427
73-76
Oval Port Open chamber
336781
454
73-85
2.06/1.77
113cc Oval port
343771
366/427/454
68-85
2.06/1.77
Open chamber Oval port
343772
366/427/454
76-84
2.06/1.77
Open chamber Oval port
343783
454
75-78
2.06/1.77
Open chamber Oval port
346236
454
75-87
2.06/1.77
113cc Oval port
346238
454
75-87
2.06/1.77
113cc Oval port
352625
454
70-76
Oval Port Open chamber
353049
454
70-73
2.06/1.77
113cc Oval port
366765
427/454
73-84
2.06/1.77
Open chamber Oval port
3732791
348
58
3758379
348
59-61
3759256
348
58
3767738
348
59-61
3781147
348
60-61
High Perf
3795586
409
61
360HP
3814690
409
62-64
High Perf
3819333
348/409
62-65
3830817
409
63-65
340HP
3837731
409
63
High Perf Z-11
3852583
409
65
400HP
3856206
396
65-66
2.06/1.77
98cc Oval port
3856208
396
65
2.06/1.77
109cc Z-16/L-37 Rectangular port
3856213
366
66-70
2.06/1.77
Closed chamber Oval port
3856260
396
68
Oval Port Closed chamber
3872702
396/427
66
2.06/1.77
98cc Oval port L-34/L-35/L-36
3873858
396/427
66-67
2.06/1.77
109cc L-78/L-72 Rectangular port
3876875
427
66-70
2.06/1.77
Closed chamber Oval port
3904390
396/427
66-67
2.06/1.77
98cc Oval port L-34/L-35/L-36
3904391
396/427
65-67
2.06/1.77
107cc L-78/L-71/L-72 Rectangular port
3904392
427
67
2.19/1.88
106cc L-88/L-89 Aluminum Rectangular port
3904393
366
66-68
2.06/1.77
Closed chamber Oval port
3908952
427
67
Oval Port Open chamber
3909802
396/427
66-67
2.06/1.77
100cc Oval port L-34/L-35/L-36/L-68
3917215
396/427
67-69
2.06/1.77
100cc Oval port L-34/L-35
3917219
366/427
66-70
2.06/1.77
Closed chamber Oval port
3919840
396/427
67-69
2.06/1.77
107cc L-78/L-71/L-72 Rectangular port
3919842
396/427
68-69
2.19/1.88
106cc L-88/L-89 Aluminum Rectangular port
3931063
396/427
69-70
2.06/1.77
100cc Oval port L-34/L-35
3933148
366/396/427
69
2.06/1.77
122cc Oval port
3933149
427
69-70
2.06/1.77
122cc Oval port
3935401
427
68-76
Oval Port Open chamber
3946074
396/454
69-71
2.19/1.88
118cc L-88/ZL-1 Aluminum Rectangular port
3964280
427/454
66-70
2.06/1.77
Closed chamber Oval port
3964290
396/402/427/454
69-70
2.06/1.77
100cc Oval port
3964291
396/402/427/454
69-70
2.19/1.88
108cc L-78/L-71/L-72/LS-6 Rectangular port 325cc intake
3964292
454
70
2.19/1.88
109cc LS-6 Rectangular port
3965198
396
69
2.06/1.77
Open chamber Oval port
3975950
366/427
68-70
2.06/1.77
Closed chamber Oval port
3986133
366/427
70-85
2.06/1.77
Closed chamber Oval port
3986136
366/427
70-84
2.06/1.77
Closed chamber Oval port
3993820
402/454
71
2.06/1.77
113cc Oval port
3994025
454
71
2.19/1.88
118cc LS-6 Rectangular port
3994026
454
71
2.19/1.88
118cc LS-6 Rectangular port
3999241
402/454
72
2.06/1.77
113cc Oval port
473328
366
68-85
2.06/1.77
Open chamber Oval port
6258723
454
71
2.19/1.88
118cc LS-6 Rectangular port
6272292
402/454
71
2.06/1.77
Open chamber Oval port
6272990
454
71-94
2.19/1.88
118cc Replacement Rectangular port 325cc intake
 
Last edited:

Grumpy

The Grumpy Grease Monkey mechanical engineer.
Staff member
Looking for a recommendation.
What are the best double hump heads out there?
I'm looking to build a 'sleeper' of sorts and want the very best heads that I can bolt on that look like the double humps of the early 60's (no bolt holes).
I want to build this 'sleeper' power plan that looks original but has a decent amount of power.
Any recommendations appreciated.

If I must have bolt hols what is the recommendation?



bolt holes can easily be filled with bondo and a bit of work with some bondo mixed with steel wool carefully sculpted bondo,
can even result in bogus camel humps that pass the magnet test, and add some paint,
and only someone who really knows what they are looking at can tell the difference.
paint and some cosmetics can hide a great deal.
I would not use old original fuelie heads as a start point the flow tech is 70 years out of date,

https://www.hotrod.com/articles/ctrp-0912-chevrolet-double-hump-cylinder-heads/

https://www.enginelabs.com/engine-tech/engine/fuelie-cylinder-heads/

heres a better route

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...-improved-fuelie-head-clone.14473/#post-75336

https://www.rodauthority.com/tech-stories/engine/double-hump-heads-trick-flow/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...sbc-street-performance-heads.9811/#post-37235

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...uellie-heads-which-cams-should-be-used.14534/
All-New Trick Flow Heads Emulate Iconic SBC ‘461 Fuelie’ Castings


By MIKE MAGDA DECEMBER 23, 2017


Development of street-worthy power parts for the Gen I Chevy small-block is rather slow during this LS-centric performance era. However, the new DHC 175 cylinder head from Trick Flow Specialties is a unique fusion of desirable vintage appearance and advanced airflow management that should appeal to the classic-car enthusiast running the original SBC architecture.

Double-Hump Beginnings



But we actually started from square one and designed these ports more for what the head is designed for. – Cory Roth, Trick Flow

Based on the iconic “double-hump” or “camel-back” (fuelie) cylinder heads of the ‘60s and early ‘70s—including the famed 461 Fuelie heads—the DHC 175 castings are modern aluminum versions with straight spark-plug locations and improved 60cc combustion chambers. The small cross-section intake runners measure 175cc, and will flow nearly 260 cfm at .500-inch lift out of the box. The exhaust ports are cast at 74cc, and flow almost 200 cfm at .500-inch lift. All of these performance numbers are an improvement over the factory originals.



Here’s a CAD representation of the Trick Flow DHC 175 head, showing the exhaust side. Engineers developed the head with a straight plug configuration and maintained the factory port and bolt locations.

The DHC heads are a different option for musclecar owners or street-rodders who prefer the appearance of the classic small-block heads, but can’t find double-hump (fuelie) survivors that haven’t cracked, and still have decks thick enough for modern performance tricks. While there are aftermarket replacement heads for the SBC that offer improved performance, none have the familiar humps that were machined on the ends of the original heads.

Retaining the factory appearance while improving performance was the motivation behind development of the DHC 175 heads. A Trick Flow executive owned a ’68 Camaro, and wanted a set of the company’s heads to look like a Fuelie head.


Here’s the production DHC head. Note the parting line in the casting that mimics an original head.

“At first, we took a production Trick Flow head and machined the outside to look like a camel-hump head,” remembers Cory Roth, supervisor for engineering, research and design at Trick Flow. “The only thing different was the angled plug. Our water jackets wouldn’t allow a straight plug.”

Here is a closeup of the exhaust ports and a cutaway showing the exhaust flow.

That shop project was a few years ago. “So, we decided to actually design a head that looked more like the stock head than what we had done,” adds Roth.


Here is a clean 462 head, which superseded the original 461 casting. Many of the surviving heads from the ’60s have very thin decks from two or three passes on the surfacer.

Started With Fuel-Injected Corvette

As noted in an earlier article, the double-hump fuelie heads were introduced on the 1962 Corvette 327ci engine that featured the mechanical Rochester fuel-injection system—hence the “Fuelie” reference. Although not all double-hump heads were on fuel-injected engines, many bench racers categorize all camel-back heads as Fuelies.




Part Numbers
Following are the Trick Flow part numbers for the four DHC 175 assembled cylinder head options:

With drilled accessory holes

TFS-30210006

1.470-inch single valve spring

TFS-30210007

1.460-inch dual valve spring

Undrilled

TFS-30210002

1.470-inch single valve spring

TFS-30210003

1.460-inch dual valve spring


A wide range of casting numbers are associated with double-hump heads. The original Fuelie head was #3782461, commonly known as the 461 head. It was originally produced for the 327ci engine, then superseded by 3890462 and 3891462 castings—better known as the 462 head. There are at least six castings that use 462 as the last three digits of a casting number. Other popular castings include the 291 (3917291), 292 (3917292), 186 (3927186), 187 (2927187), 414 (3973414) and 492 (3991492). The 492 was the last of the double-hump heads. It was standard equipment on the 350ci LT1 engine produced in the early ‘70s.



Perhaps the factory double-hump head closest to the new Trick Flow offering was the 461x non-production race head. It came with 172cc runners and a larger combustion chamber.


Here’s the intake side of the DHC 175 head.

While all double-hump heads were cast iron, Trick Flow chose to engineer the new head in A356-T61 aluminum, as the company has no experience with iron castings. “And, it’s 20 pounds lighter than a factory head,” says Roth.


Here is a closeup of the intake port.

Since it was the team’s first straight-plug head, they started with some simple observations in the beginning of the development. “We studied heads from the production years to learn about accessory bolt holes and other features,” says Roth.

Airflow Numbers

The first double-hump heads had no accessory holes, because the brackets were mounted to the block or water pump. Later models were designed for use with accessory brackets that mount to the heads. Trick Flow offers the DHC head in both styles. Actually, there are four part numbers for this cylinder head. They are differentiated by the bolt holes and a choice between 1.470-inch single valve springs or 1.460-inch dual valve springs. More on that choice later.


This cutaway shows the thick deck material and coolant capacity.

The straight-plug configuration also prompted Trick Flow to start with a fresh port design. “We didn’t use anything that already existed,” says Roth, noting that the team had access to numerous SBC port designs to leverage ideas, but chose to develop completely new ports. “We have 175, 195, 215, and 230cc runner availability. It’s something we’ve worked on in the past,” adds Roth. “But, we actually started from square one and designed these ports more for what the head is designed for.”

The DHC heads are available with or without accessory bolt holes.

The intake port location is stock, so traditional manifolds will bolt up with no problem with a Fel-Pro 1256 gasket. Port dimension is listed as 1.230 x 1.990-inch. Bench testing by Trick Flow reveals 258 cfm at .500-inch lift with a slight drop to 254 cfm at .600-inch lift. That’s flowing through a 2.02-inch intake valve. The relatively small cross-section intake runner dimensions should promote low-rpm torque and off-idle throttle response for more enjoyable street performance with a small-block engine.

The exhaust side features a 1.600-inch valve, and the port volume is 74cc. The outlet dimension is 1.240 x 1.240-inch, and is in the stock location to match a Fel-Pro 1404 gasket. According to Trick Flow tests, the exhaust port flows 198 cfm at .500-inch lift and 207 cfm at .600-inch lift. All airflow tests were conducted at 28 inches of water, and with a 4.030-inch bore fixture. Exhaust pipe was 1.75-inch diameter.



Inside The Chamber

Trick Flow retained the stock 23-degree valve angle location, so the heads will work with standard SBC pistons. The heads come with ductile iron valve seats, bronze alloy valve guides, and Viton seals. Valve angle on the seats is 45 degrees, and customers have two valve springs choices. First is a 1.470-inch single valve springs with 118 pound seat pressure and 300-pound open. Recommended max valve lift is .540-inch. The next option is a 1.460-inch dual valve springs with 125 pound seat pressure and 376-pound open. Recommended max valve lift is .600-inch. Both valves have 11/32-inch stems and come with chromoly retainers and 7-degree locks. “It’s a current spring package we’ve proven on other applications,” notes Roth.

Shown is a comparison of the combustion chambers in the DHC 175 head (left) and an original 462 head (right). The stock head appears to be equipped with 1.940/1.500-inch valves, which gives the impression they're less shrouded than the Trick Flow head. Also, the stock head has a flatter surface around the top of the valve job while there is more of a transition from the valve job to the edges of the combustion chamber, again lending to the appearance of less shrouding on the older head. Roth says at lower valve lifts, the combustion chamber has to be closer to the valve to support the incoming air. The straight plug was retained for the visual aspect, but the casting design allows Trick Flow to machine the head for an angled plug, if desired, without interference to the water jacket.



Due to the valve size, Trick Flow recommends a minimum bore size of 4.000-inch. The heads come with 5/16-inch guide plates and 3/8-inch rocker arm studs. The heads will work with 1.5:1 or 1.6:1 rocker arms. Longer than stock pushrods are required.

When matched side-by-side, the DHC head will have a taller profile than its factory counterpart. “To get those ports and use existing valvetrain geometries, our valve-cover rail is raised about 3/8-inch,” says Roth. “We wanted the original Corvette and other cast and stamped valve covers to fit. So, we wanted to make sure our valvetrain fits under those covers. If you’re running factory air conditioning, some brackets might run into interference.

The 60cc combustion chamber is CNC profiled to support the valve sizes and spark-plug location, in addition to improving burn efficiency.


Closeup of the DHC 175 60cc combustion chamber. Note the 2.20/160-inch valves. Trick Flow recommends a cylinder bore of at least 4.000-inch.

“We stuck within the parameters of the chamber size we were shooting for,” explains Roth. “Although we didn’t compare airflow with an original head, we had team members who ported and worked with these heads in the past. We had an idea what was achievable with a factory casting.”

The spark-plug location was especially challenging. Roth’s team had to test fit numerous sets of headers to ensure proper clearance in various applications. And the head architecture itself presented challenges in positioning the spark plug.

“The spark plug is close to the deck, so it’s very hard to get water around,” explains Roth. “With cast iron it would be easy to do. With aluminum, the spot face for the plug is very close to the deck surface. We had to figure out how we could make it strong and not weaken the head by putting the spark plug there?”


Another view of the DHC 175 head.

Painted Chevy Orange, or any other preferred engine color, should give the DHC cylinder heads a vintage appearance. The cast surface texture appears original, except for the cast-iron gray hue. “We even have a cast parting line like the original heads,” says Roth.

The DHC 175 heads sell with a street price of just under $741 per assembled head with the dual valve springs and just under $671 with the single spring. That means the heads are an affordable option to those wanting the vintage look of a great small-block head for their ride.



as usual the KEY to performance is in matching the component parts of the combo
youll want as much displacement as you can afford,to assemble,
remember youll get x hp per cubic inch of displacement.
and as high of compression as the fuel octane you can use regularly will allow,
the car should be geared to match the cams intake duration and power range,
the headers should also match that intended operational power band.
generally if your trying to duplicate an old school muscle car ,
youll ideally want to build a 383-406 displacement and match it to a car with a manual transmission,
most people can,t easily tell a 283 from a 400 SBC.
or at least a 3200 rpm stall speed converter and have a 3.73:1-4.11:1 rear gear ratio,
cam duration would generally fall in the 235-245 & .050 lift and lift in the .500-.530 range,
LSA in the 106-110 range.
long tube , 1.75" headers, and a dual plane intake like an air gap,
or if you want a bit more old school ,dual quads add nostalgia and class,
and even a bit of extra power if you can tune the car well.
keep in mind reducing weight helps performance a great deal, and don,t ignore durability,
you really benefit from a 7-8 quart oil pan and a large radiator and added oil coolers
, for the engine and if its an auto trans a trans fluid cooler.
a lighter weight car like a 2000 lb-3000lb vega or t-bucket makes even a moderately powerful engine combo
have potential,
but stick a similar engine in a 3800 lb impalla or a 3/4 ton, rated 4300 lb truck , and you throw most of the potential in the proverbial dumpster

not all the links relate to your build but may be helpful
https://www.speedwaymotors.com/Moroso-37800-Chevy-Block-Deck-Plug-Kit,590.html

http://www.superchevy.com/how-to/engines-drivetrain/83818-block-plug-basics/

https://www.chevyhardcore.com/tech-...g-101-getting-started-with-your-engine-build/

https://www.chevrolet.com/performance/engine-components/small-block/race-blocks

https://www.hotrod.com/articles/hrdp-1210-chevrolet-350-small-block-comparison/

https://www.dragzine.com/news/engine-machining-101-getting-started-with-your-engine-build/

https://www.chevydiy.com/big-block-chevrolet-engine-step-step-rebuid-machine-shop-guide/

https://www.chevydiy.com/machine-shop-guide-build-chevy-small-block-engines/

http://www.budgetenginerebuilders.com/machining-services/

https://www.steveschmidtracing.com/machine-shop
 
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