Hole In Block? Or......?

Johnatthebox

Active Member
My friend just finished a rebuild on a dodge 360 . Everything went back together and when he put water in the radiator, it dumped right into the oil pan.
Took it back apart. Checked surfaces, clearances, gaskets, etc...
Put it back together, and same problem..... fast drain into oil pan....
?????????????
 

Grumpy

The Grumpy Grease Monkey mechanical engineer.
Staff member
dodge 360 engines have occasionally had similar issues with leaking timing cover gaskets ,
and cracks in the cylinder heads,
but the only smart route is to pressurize the coolant system and look for the leaks source,
yeah! a real P.I.T.A. to do with the engine assembled in the car
a leak-down test on each cylinder can help find a cracked head or blown head gasket,
if all 8 cylinders have similar pressure test results and youve just replaced the head gaskets Id be looking at the timing cover and water pump area as the source
removing the timing cover and closely inspecting it and replacing its gasket is a great idea.
http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/leakdown-compression-test.881/#post-56489

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...-replacing-bad-head-gaskets.15126/#post-86266

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/leak-down-test.332/#post-14272

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...-to-be-a-forgotten-art-form.11838/#post-56133

https://www.allpar.com/mopar/4bbl.html

https://www.amazon.com/dp/0895864797/ref=rdr_ext_tmb
 
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Johnatthebox

Active Member
dodge 360 engines have occasionally had similar issues with leaking timing cover gaskets ,
and cracks in the cylinder heads,
but the only smart route is to pressurize the coolant system and look for the leaks source,
yeah! a real P.I.T.A. to do with the engine assembled in the car
a leak-down test on each cylinder can help find a cracked head or blown head gasket,
if all 8 cylinders have similar pressure test results and youve just replaced the head gaskets Id be looking at the timing cover and water pump area as the source
removing the timing cover and closely inspecting it and replacing its gasket is a great idea.
http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/leakdown-compression-test.881/#post-56489

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...-replacing-bad-head-gaskets.15126/#post-86266

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/leak-down-test.332/#post-14272

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...-to-be-a-forgotten-art-form.11838/#post-56133

https://www.allpar.com/mopar/4bbl.html

https://www.amazon.com/dp/0895864797/ref=rdr_ext_tmb
We thought about this, pressurizing each cylinder and seeing if air bubbles show in the radiator, but the water doesnt stay in there long enough....
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Grumpy

The Grumpy Grease Monkey mechanical engineer.
Staff member
youve stated youve replaced the head gaskets, have you recently replaced the timing cover gaskets?
 

Grumpy

The Grumpy Grease Monkey mechanical engineer.
Staff member
if thats true, it seems like your options are limited to cracked heads, intake or block,
or a coolant plug you left out someplace,or a gasket improperly installed.
I kind of wish we had start treks transporter so I could just materialize & drop in and help you isolate the source,
let me do some research its been 20 years since I built a dodge small block


this video may be helpful
 
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Loves302Chevy

"One test is worth a thousand expert opinions."
Wow, that sucks. I can't even imagine where a hole that big could be to cause that.
Are you using any type of oil cooler?
 
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Grumpy

The Grumpy Grease Monkey mechanical engineer.
Staff member
I know this will not be what you want too hear ,
but think logically, isolate and test. don,t get discouraged ,
theres not a damn thing thats difficult to isolate or locate,
just time, persistence and use of logic.
and fix once its located, yeah, it might get expensive
or you might simply find you got careless and over looked something,
its all part of "paying your dues" and gaining experience.
its a good learning opportunity ,
if it was my truck/car,
Id have pulled the engine and had it out on an engine stand in a couple hours time.
I don,t know how anyone serious about this hobby can function without access to both,
an engine stand and an engine crane,
I worked for 30 years with a couple floor jacks, and (6)
12 ton jack stands before I owned a hydraulic car lift,
but I purchased an engine crane and several engine stands back in the late 1960s
you may be inclined to RENT an engine stand or engine crane,
if you don,t own them, already,
Id advise against that, as projects can have and frequently do have,
un-expected delays, finding parts or waiting on machine shops,
and rental cost can easily, add up and exceed purchase prices,
and if so inclined you can sell tools once your done with a project,
(not something Id advise as youll want them next time,)

but its an option. and generally cheaper than renting in the longer term


having access to a welder (MIG IS GREAT FOR THIS)
makes mods to engine stands and cranes rather easy
EngineHoisttow2.JPG

ntenginestand1.jpg


http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...engine-stand-mods-accesories.3724/#post-26984

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...-from-crane-to-engine-stand.11524/#post-53161

standmodg.jpg

I really like the way the engine stand pictured was upgraded, its obviously significantly more stable after the mods

https://www.harborfreight.com/2000-lbs-capacity-foldable-engine-stand-69522.html
 
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Grumpy

The Grumpy Grease Monkey mechanical engineer.
Staff member
well? any more progress?
have you pulled it down for a close detailed inspection?
what did you find?
 
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