Mounting An Effective Trans Cooler On A C4 Corvette

grumpyvette

Administrator
Staff member
now I know few cars with less room to mount an efficient oil cooler with a fan than a c4 corvette, and after I installed a 3200 rpm stall converter in my corvette it became obvious I needed an aux trans fluid cooler.
theres very little under the hood room and ground clearance is already minimal at best.
http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...all-and-run-a-deeper-pan-to-compensate.16378/

I chose to mount the large additional oil/trans fluid cooler inside a modified rear spare tire carrier with a large section replaced with a perforated aluminum sheet. that allows air flow through its outer lower surface, set the fans to suck air from above and force air outwards and down towards the pavement as this also tends to cool the fuel tank.
I would strongly suggest you never consider use of fuel line and AN type fitting for use as transmission fluid transfer lines even if a transmission fluid cooler is used,
if you bring the current fittings that fit the transmission to a local hydraulic supply shop along with the exact length of the lines you need and explain what your trying to do , they can fabricate the correct, high pressure and high heat tolerant, transmission fluid lines to your exact specifications for VERY REASONABLE COST, thus preventing what might otherwise become a potential weak link.
common rubber fuel line will NEVER hold up under the heat and pressure of a transmission fluid transfer line ,long term.
most rubber fuel line , even FUEL INJECTION LINE is rated to work at UNDER 200 psi and UNDER 250 F, your typical transmission fluid will occasionally exceed 250F and commonly run in the 160F-210F temp range even with a trans fluid cooler, internal cross sectional area of the fluid transfer lines matters, anything less than 1/2" or AN#8 can be restrictive to flow

Sizing-FittingThreadx.gif


one of the most common mistakes less than experienced performance enthusiasts, face and very commonly over-look, is the fact that the internal cross sectional area on many hydraulic and fuel line fittings are considerably more restrictive to flow that the fuel limes or hydraulic lines inside diameter they were designed to be used with, and it varies a great deal between different manufacturers, now ideally the fittings internal passage cross sectional area is both consistent and the same or greater that the tube or hydraulic line size, it listed to match, , so a 1/2" inside diameter fuel line, or hydraulic lines?hoses, for example should have components for the connections and fittings that have significantly smaller internal cross sectional areas, it does you very little good to use lets say, AN#8 or half inch fuel lines if the internal cross sectional area of the connections and fitting used with those lines is only 3/8" or smaller in cross sectional area,this is an area where dealing with a local hydraulic supply shop that has the correct tools and fittings to custom fabricate your fuel lines, coolant or lubrication lines is a very good idea!
talk to a local professional at your local hydraulic supply, measure accurately, take the time to explain what your trying to accomplish and take several pictures to show them what your doing, and get them too fabricate any high pressure fuel or coolant lines and related fittings



fitr1.jpg

fitr2.jpg

fitr3.jpg

*
Up to 45 GPH= 3/4 GPM = 5/16" or -04 AN

*
Up to 90 GPH = 1.5 GPM= 3/8" or -06 AN

*
Up to 250 GPH =4.2 GPM= 1/2" or -08 AN

nearly ideal for transmission and oil coolers :D
*
Up to 450 GPH =7.5 GPM= 5/8" or -10 AN

*
Up to 900 GPH = 15GPM 3/4"or -12 AN


fitcr1.jpg

fitcr2.jpg

fitcr3.jpg

fitcr4.PNG



I don,t remember, where I purchased most of the oil/trans fluid coolers Ive used ,
but I've purchased and installed several oil and trans fluid coolers
over the decades, almost all were used 1/2" or an#8 connections and were purchased from summit or jegs
as always read carefully,
and measure accurately, remembering you must be leaving room for the hot oil or trans fluid hose and connections
and access to get the cooler in and mounted and connections made too it!
you would certainly not be the first or last guy to buy a cooler that will not fit in the space you though it would,
due to the connections and hoses required or forgetting about the thickness or lack of easy access.

https://www.summitracing.com/parts/der-15820

https://www.summitracing.com/search?PageSize=100&SortBy=BestKeywordMatch&SortOrder=Ascending&keyword=oil cooler with fan

https://www.jegs.com/i/Derale/259/15850/10002/-1

https://www.jegs.com/webapp/wcs/sto...&submodel=&engine=&Nrpp=&No=&persistYmm=false

read this link
http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...oosing-an-engine-oil-cooler.15375/#post-90261

http://www.novaflex.com/productcart/pc/features_pdf/mjarine Fuel Hose2.pdf

http://www.gmcmhphotos.com/photos/data/6113/Barricade_Training_Final.pdf

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/flex-fuel-lines.4381/#post-14833


http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...-air-conditioner-on-cooling.12232/#post-59597

hydraulic line is usually rated OVER 2500 psi and up to 300F temps
there ARE several suppliers of adapter tail housings for the conversion of a much stronger 4l80E transmission to the C4 corvettes C-beam support

yes its very unfortunate that there's no commonly, available, and reasonably priced, independent rear differential,available to the performance car enthusiasts,with large disc brakes in the compatible width, and easily retro fitted suspension mounts that I'm aware of, in most local salvage yards , similar to the corvette rear suspension, that has the strength of the dana 60 rear differential.
yes there are custom fabricated solutions, if you have a very healthy bank balance , but nothing based on a dana 60-70- or ford 9" or heavier duty independent G.M. differential

4l80etail.jpg



RELATED

http://www.discounthydraulichose.com/1_2_Custom_Hydraulic_Hoses_s/335.htm


http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/valve-spring-cooling-via-engine-oil.6491/

http://www.discounthydraulichose.com/Hydraulic_Hose_s/84.htm

http://www.discounthydraulichose.co....htm?Click=2&gclid=COWnvIjq9ckCFVQ2aQoddYEF_g

http://www.parker.com/literature/Hose Products Division/Catalog 4400 PDF Files/Master_Table_of_Contents.pdf

READ THRU THESE THREADs ALSO
viewtopic.php?f=57&t=176

viewtopic.php?f=32&t=430

viewtopic.php?f=71&t=10749&p=46948#p46948

viewtopic.php?f=57&t=176&p=12473&hilit=corvette+trans+cooler#p12473


garage25.jpg

cooler+diagram.jpg

faq098.jpg


internal cross sectional area of the fluid transfer lines matters, anything less than 1/2" or AN#8 can be restrictive to flow
Sizing-FittingThreadx.gif


fluidcapk.png

fitsp1.png

fitsp2.png




retli.png

https://www.summitracing.com/parts/prm-13182/overview/
prm-13182_rz_xl.jpg

keep in mind that any trans fluid cooler should have a minimum of AN#8 or 1/2" line size and an electric cooling fan, normally youll see ratings like (22000, lb vehicle weight )

the problem many of us have is in finding the room to install the cooler and for many of us the price seems a bit high, but if you can spend $150-$350 on a cooler that will easily prevent the vast majority of transmission failures related to running too hot
(MANY IF NOT MOST DURABILITY ISSUES RELATE TO THIS)
and a decent performance transmission and torque converter could easily cost 10 too 15 times the cost of the transmission cooler
the cost seems to be easier to justify.
yes the coolers with the AN#6 /3/8" line size are cheaper , but they generally are flow restrictive and in my opinion a waste of time and money

https://www.summitracing.com/parts/der-15820
der-15820_w.jpg


https://www.summitracing.com/parts/der-15830
der-15830_w.jpg


https://www.summitracing.com/parts/flx-45951
flx-45951_w.jpg


theres little sense in even having a relay in a car that won,t operate at a minimum of 12 volts and at least 30 amps minimum,
but Id have to point out that matched sets of relays and pigtails are readily available in several amp ranges rather cheaply.
once you understand how they are designed to function testing or replacing one is no
challenge


https://www.amazon.com/ARTGEAR-Harness-Color-Labeled-Automotive-Motorcycle/dp/B078T3RC5T

https://www.summitracing.com/parts/pco-5593pt/overview/

https://www.amazon.com/Fastronix-Weatherproof-Automotive-Relay-Socket/dp/B01CXA42XK

https://www.ebay.com/bhp/60-amp-relay

https://www.ebay.com/bhp/80-amp-relay

https://www.summitracing.com/parts/...MIq4ObtvSz3wIVU57ACh0MfQn4EAQYAiABEgJsYfD_BwE

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07F83159...&pd_rd_r=991c9f49-060a-11e9-bb5a-dff16524fffe


you generally feed the fluid in the bottom and out the top line connection to prevent air trapped in the lines
naturally youll want to route all lines as far from headers as you can to prevent burns on the lines


Cooler Fittings
General Motors Ford Chrysler

GM Transmission Cooler Fittings


Powerglide - OEM
Fitting Location Thread Size Flow Direction
Upper â…›" Pipe Return/in
Lower â…›" Pipe Cooler feed/out


Powerglide - Dedenbear
Fitting Location Thread Size Flow Direction
Upper ¼" Pipe Return/in
Lower ¼" Pipe Cooler feed/out


TH200C Metric, 2004R
Fitting Location Thread Size Flow Direction
Upper ¼" Pipe Cooler feed/out
Lower ¼" Pipe Return/in


TH350, TH250
Fitting Location Thread Size Flow Direction
Upper ¼" Pipe Return/in
Lower ¼" Pipe Cooler feed/out


TH400
Fitting Location Thread Size Flow Direction
Upper ¼" Pipe Return/in
Lower ¼" Pipe Cooler feed/out


700R4/4L60/4L60E/4L65E
Fitting Location Thread Size Flow Direction
Upper ¼" Pipe Return/in
Lower ¼" Pipe Cooler feed/out


4L80E (1991-1996)
Fitting Location Thread Size Flow Direction
Upper ¼" Pipe Return/in
Lower ¼" Pipe Cooler feed/out


4L80E/4L85E (1997 & later)
Fitting Location Thread Size Flow Direction
Rear ¼" Pipe Return/in
Front ¼" Pipe Cooler feed/out

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...sion-and-oil-cooler-increases-durability.176/
think about it a bit, the ideal trans coolant temp should be in the 150F-160F range, so how you route the trans fluid cooler lines maters, engine coolant can easily run 210F-230F going into the top of the radiator, from a hot engine and run 170F-180F returning too the engine after its trip through the radiator, thats more likely to heat than cool transmission fluid.
having an aux trans cooler with an electric powered fan and AN#8 minimum line size is generally a very good idea!(obviously you need to have the clearance and location to mount it
http://www.summitracing.com/parts/der-15960
der-15950_w.jpg


diagramoilroute.gif

OR
out of trans, to radiator cooler, out to
aux cooler, back to trans?
cooler+diagram.jpg


measure very carefully youll need to mount the transmission cooler in a location that allows clearance for both the cooler and its supply lines and in a location with easy access to outside air flow so the heated air can rapidly be replaced with cooler outside air, for effective heat reduction to the fluid to effectively take place.
ID suggest no smaller than AN#8 line (1/2") size and a 24000 lb weight rated cooler if you have the room to mount one on a serious race application, with a high stall speed torque converter.

https://www.summitracing.com/parts/der-15850/overview/

https://www.summitracing.com/parts/der-15900/overview/

https://www.summitracing.com/parts/flx-45908/overview/

flx-45908_w.jpg

Ford Transmission Cooler Fittings

C3, C4, C5, C6
Fitting Location Thread Size Thread Size Flow Direction
Front ¼" Pipe Cooler feed/out
Rear ¼" Pipe Return/in


AOD
Fitting Location Thread Size Flow Direction
Upper ¼" Pipe Cooler feed/out
Lower ¼" Pipe Return/in


AODE/4R70W
Fitting Location Thread Size Flow Direction
Upper ¼" Pipe Return/in
Lower ¼" Pipe Cooler feed/out


E4OD/4R100
Fitting Location Thread Size Flow Direction
Front ¼" Pipe Cooler feed/out
Rear ¼" Pipe Return/in


Chrysler Transmission Cooler Fittings
All Torqueflite
Fitting Location Thread Size Flow Direction
Front â…›" Pipe Cooler feed/out
Rear â…›" Pipe Return/in

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...fo-and-derale-trans-cool-pans.662/#post-34937

http://www.msgpio.com/manuals/mshift/mods.html

LOOK THIS OVER
http://www.transmissioncenter.org/Auxil ... _Where.htm

http://www.superchevy.com/how-to/tr...g-the-ultimate-4l60e-with-better-gear-ratios/


https://www.speedwaymotors.com/Hi-Volume-S-B-Chevy-Claimer-Oil-Pan-Combo-RH-Side-Dipstick,28103.html

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...fo-and-derale-trans-cool-pans.662/#post-89196

BTW HERES AN IMPORTANT TIP, IF YOUR INSTALLING A REMOTE OIL COOLER, IT is really common for guys to use lines that are far too small, that restrict flow oil flow or select a transmission or oil cooler that has to small of internal passages, shop carefully you want a MINIMUM of 1/2, or AN8 line size and 5/8" or AN10 is BETTER.
many guys don,t realize that adding an oil and/or a transmission fluid cooler, with its own fan and radiator that allows those liquids to be cooled separately, to your engine and drive train, significantly reduces the heat load on the radiator, and generally allows the engine temps to decline noticeably. in fact just adding a high volume oil pan and a transmission cooler can drop your engine coolant temps 20F-30F in many cases, an effective trans fluid cooler should allow you to keep the trans fluid temp in the 160F-to-180F temp range
prm-12318.jpg


remotefil.jpg

remote mounted oil filters can be used along with an oil cooler to to increase transmission cooler efficiency
OilCooler01z.jpg

a rather common issue with adding oil coolers, is that many of the coolers available can significantly restrict fluid flow because of the small restrictive internal cross section of the internal tubing, AN #6 and 3/8" tube coolers can be quite restrictive, the AN#8 are better but DUAL AN#8 coolers and AN#10 lines generally work the best, and there's also frequently limited space to position a cooler in the outside cool air flow mandating a powered fans.
the solution to both issues can and frequently does require use of two different oil coolers but placed in series this can further increase flow restrictions, the solution is in use of larger internal cross sectional area,transfer lines and mounting the twin coolers in parallel thus doubling the effective cross sectional area reducing the flow restriction the cooler potentially could produce if used in series

http://auto.howstuffworks.com/auto-part ... olers2.htm

http://www.grandprix.net/upgrades/cooler.html

http://www.iroczone.com/projtranscooler.htm

http://www.chevyhiperformance.com/tech/ ... index.html

http://www.bulkpart.com/transmission-cooler.html

viewtopic.php?f=54&t=1280&p=2741&hilit=+tank+oil+drops#p2741

http://www.fordmuscle.com/forums/tech-e ... ooler.html

heres a decent trans cooler

http://store.summitracing.com/partdetai ... toview=sku

heres a decent trans and engine oil combo cooler

http://store.summitracing.com/partdetai ... toview=sku

http://www.enginefactory.com/Corvette_History.htm
MOST guys run 3/8" lines to the transmission cooler, theres not much sense in running larger than 3/8"-1/2" lines simply because the restrictions in the trans in and out ports make larger lines wasted effort and smaller lines are too restrictive

heres my corvettes trans cooler

http://store.summitracing.com/partdetai ... toview=sku

notice the 3/8" NPT fitting size, measure very carefully and a local hydraulic supply can make you custom lines to fit your cars custom trans cooler installation, making the install far easier, btw if you do what I did the spare tires removed and the carry lid that covers it needs to be modified but it works great

heres one way to hook up cooler lines in tight places

banjovv.jpg


banjo2v.jpg


banjo3v.jpg


keep in mind you can install a heat controlled valve that routes cool trans or engine oil back to the engine or transmission but one either fluid heats up it routes the hot fluid thru the cooler


http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...le-that-don-t-use-resources.12125/#post-58374


oillinetstata.jpg

Id also point out that swapping to a 7-8 quart oil pan significantly increases the surface heat transfer area and in my experience that significant reduces oil temps all by itself.
Id also point out that adding an auxiliary oil cooler with electric fan ,mated with larger AN#10 oil line size,and use of the longer higher capacity oil filter(s) to any corvette (STOCK OR BIG BLOCK ENGINE SWAP) adds effective oil flow volume to the engine, this can be a HUGE advantage when theres limited room due to ground clearance or header clearance issues that limits the size of the oil pan itself that can be used.
prm-12318.jpg

diagramoilroute.gif

http://shop.perma-cool.com/1073-Oil-The ... s-1073.htm
keep in mind the whole idea of an aux trans fluid cooler is to increase the transmission durability by keeping the trans fluid temps low, an effective trans fluid cooler should allow you to keep the trans fluid temp in the 160F-to-180F temp range (in the 160f-170F range ideally) this is best done efficiently by routing the trans fluid thru the radiators heat exchanger then thru an aux radiator style oil cooler with its own electric fan, which will effectively dissipate the remaining absorbed heat much further ,lowering and controlling the fluid temps still further before the fluid returns to the transmission to be re-used.

Ive built engines for . and helped work on, some of the local circle track guys cars, and far more engines for street performance,
muscle car enthusiasts, and drag racers, I,d love to own a new corvette or build a car to race at sebring or lemans,
but making my monthly bills , while supporting both my and my son's family,is already a huge change.
personally I think owning a dependable transportation car that can when asked to run 11 second 1/4 mile et
and still drive on vacation with little chance of it breaking down,
is about the largest challenge most of our bank balance's can hope to cover

176.jpg

theres certainly not much room under the hood and ground clearance is a huge issue
176mm.jpg


I first calculated the size of cooler I wanted , then realized there was no place it would easily fit, until I thought about replacing the rear spare tire with the cooler by purchasing a second spare tire carrier cover and a sheet of thin perforated steel plate so I could cut out a decent size area of the surface and cover it with the of thin perforated steel plate tpo protect the fins on the cooler yet allow a good deal of easy access to the airflow under the car, and mounting the cooler in place of the spare tire allows easy servicing,from behind the car nothing obvious shows or hangs down as I painted the perforated screen flat black, just like the spare tires carrier cover,and since the trans cooler is mounted inside the spare tire cover its up out of the way of road trash, yes you'll need to run the lines from the transmission back to the oil cooler but after careful measuring I had a local hydraulic shop fabricate two 5/8" inside diam trans fluid lines that are designed to work at up to 300 psi and 300f temp, to fit the cooler with the correct end adapters keep in mind youll want a cooler with a minimum of AN#8 fittings so that the internal line size is not restrictive to flow and matching lines to the transmission with a minimum of 1/2' inside diam. a cooler with AN#6 or 3/8" lines size is likely to restrict flow rates
http://www.summitracing.com/parts/der-15800

http://www.summitracing.com/parts/der-15719
157193a.jpg

157193b.jpg

if you have a transmission fluid or engine oil cooler on your car please post pictures of the install and comments as to its effectiveness at reducing the fluid temps,
once you get in some actual driving time because theres almost always a few kinks to iron out,
in any new drive train installation, and theres always adjustments and tuning required.
I know lots of guys use those type of trans fluid coolers with good results , but I must be a bit unlucky,
Ive tried those several times with less than in my case optimal results so I just keep using the small heat exchange type like this with the auxiliary powered fan,
which, unfortunately in my experience, are more expensive, harder to install and generally more of a P.I.T.A. to deal with, but they work,
http://www.summitracing.com/parts/der-15800
der-15800a.jpg

der-15800b.jpg

obviously the type above has efficiency advantages over the type pictured below, but the ease of installation, less packaging restrictions and lower cost, and no need to run a electrical feed to a fan all make this type , below rather interesting

AAF-ALL52100.jpg

http://www.summitracing.com/parts/aaf-all52100
theres obviously many options you can chose, in an oil or fluid cooler, but remember theres limits to the room available and the lines adapters and connections, take up room around the cooler core radiator fan assembly, so measure carefully, look for AN#8 connections and a decent size cooler to be sure the limited air flow will still cool fluid easily
those aluminum finned tube coolers work, are reasonably cheap, very durable ,but a bit restrictive

https://www.summitracing.com/parts/mor-41205/overview/
MOR-41205.jpg

https://www.summitracing.com/parts/der-13266

https://www.summitracing.com/parts/der-13267

der-13266_w.jpg

these in line fluid coolers like the one pictured above are not as effective as the larger surface area fan equipped fluid coolers
like the one below but theres no doubt they can be used to lower the transmission fluid or oil temps if,
your very limited on available space to mount a fluid cooler



https://www.summitracing.com/parts/der-15850
der-15850_xl.jpg


but they don,t cool trans fluid or oil no where near as efficiently/fast as the larger fan equipped coolers with the AN#8 line size
and in either case finding a place to mount any cooler where you can keep it out of sight and still easily access fresh outside air flow,
is usually a problem for most people

https://www.summitracing.com/parts/der-15850
der-15850_w.jpg


https://www.summitracing.com/parts/der-15950
der-15950_w.jpg



http://www.summitracing.com/parts/der-15850
http://www.summitracing.com/parts/flx-45908
flx-45908_w.jpg

der-13720_w.jpg


https://www.summitracing.com/parts/flx-45908
flx-45908_w.jpg

Summit Racing Part Number:FLX-45908

Overall Height (in):10.500 in.

Overall Width (in):15.000 in.

Overall Thickness (in):4.000 in.

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...-air-conditioner-on-cooling.12232/#post-59597
96ex2.jpg


SOURCES FOR CORVETTE CARRIER COVERS

http://www.corvettesalvage.com/index.ph ... cts_id=471
http://www.vette2vette.com/
sparecover1a.jpg

sparecover2a.jpg

C4_STC_9496.jpg

C4a9496.jpg

perforated-metal02-big.jpg


BTW don,t go nuts trying to fabricate the perforated sheet aluminum, cutting and test fitting, metal, its far faster and easier, too use scissors and poster board and tape to do the test fitting and clearance checks to make an accurate pattern before you cut the perforated sheet aluminum

http://www.onlinemetals.com/merchant.cf ... top_cat=60
viewtopic.php?f=71&t=662&p=12989#p12989



flx-4110g.jpg

I posted this bit of info, that will be useful if your swapping to a big block, because the stock radiator won,t be adequate

you tend to find the better radiators cost more, but are better built and more efficient

http://www.summitracing.com/parts/gri-6 ... plications (griffen 3.5" thick, $727)
http://www.summitracing.com/parts/dwr-1139084a (dewitts 3.25" thick 388 square inches of core face $525)
http://www.summitracing.com/parts/bci-62031 (becool 2" thick 360 square inches of core face $525)

HERES a Dewitt aluminum rad and wow is it a lot thicker! Here is the old:
Photo0262a.jpg

And the new:
Photo0261a.jpg

it should be obvious the DEWITT ALUMINUM radiator (pictured above) provides far more heat transfer surface area, Theres several well known sources for quality aluminum radiators and just as obviously theres clearance and space issues to consider.(measure carefully and get the most effective aluminum radiator you can afford because the stock 1.5" thick radiator won,t work well)
most big blocks used in engine swaps produce a good deal more power than a stock SBC and burn a good deal more fuel, this results in a good deal more heat thats generated that needs to be transferred efficiently to outside air flow,the engines power generating extra power seems to always require a larger size radiator , now obviously without knowing the radiators fluid capacity,surface area and air and coolant flow rates I can,t tell if your radiator is fully up to the task at hand, but the symptoms that are usually described, of the engine heat building rapidly if the cars not moving tend to point to a need for a higher air flow rate thru the radiator.
I generally use 2-or-3 core 1.5 inch tube designs ,that are at least 3" thick if given a choice, but theres a good many factors involved, and adding a 200 amp alternator or a more efficient fan and adding an additional oil or trans cooler could very easily make a huge difference, as it lowers the heat loads on the cooling system
c4vettewire.jpg
Grounds00021a.jpg


the location of the transmission fluid cooler,
OR BOTH THE TRANSMISSION FLUID AND DIFFERENTIAL LUBE COOLER CAN BE LOCATED THERE IN THE REAR SPARE TIRE RACK LOCATION IF YOU SELECT A DUAL COOLER WITH A FAN
thats where I put mine

13318.jpg

13311.jpg


read the links
http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...at-manifold-air-temp-sensor.10349/#post-42530

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...elay-switch-locations-and-info.728/#post-9217


http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/cooler-denser-air.8961/#post-54496


http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...oosing-an-engine-oil-cooler.15375/#post-90261

 
Last edited by a moderator:

philly

solid fixture here in the forum
what were your tranny temps before and after that cooler install, grumpy? it seems my tranny is dead set on being between 200-210 *F and i've been thinking about getting a cooler to deal with it.
 

grumpyvette

Administrator
Staff member
RELATED INFO
read the links and sub-links
my 1985 corvette came with a factory oil cooler, that runs engine coolant through separate but contacting internal passages, this warms the oil faster getting it flowing but tends to reduce the heat engine oil can reach as it absorbs oil heat effectively transferring it too the engine coolant on the car, where its transferred too air flow through the radiator, this does a decent job if your cruising but not on a high performance application where a larger transmission fluid cooler does a significantly better job
1985oilc1.jpg

obviously this cooler mounts between the block and oil filter and runs coolant through separate passages with a common wall to the oil flow so the coolant which is generally 10F-20F cooler than the oil will absorb some of the oils heat load. (use of the extra long oil filter,
coolfins.jpg

BTW I DON,T KNOW WHO SELLS THESE BUT IVE GOT TWO ON MY CORVETTES OIL FILTERS AND THEY EASILY REDUCE OIL TEMPS 7-15 DEGREES
51794.jpg

filter11.jpg

I don,t know where they sell these, finned aluminum filter covers now ,a few years back these were $20 each and significantly longer that this picture shows,
in fact they were the length of the long oil filter ,and believe it or not the combo of the longer oil filter and finned cover dropped my oil temps an additional 5 deg F , EASY TO PROVE by simply removing and replacing the slip on finned cover several times after keeping detailed records while cruising the interstate at a steady 70 mph (not a big difference but for $20 well worth it!

and a larger capacity baffled oil pan, also helps as it exposes more surface area to cooler under the car air flow)
http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...fo-and-derale-trans-cool-pans.662/#post-12989


https://www.etrailer.com/faq-about-engine-transmission-coolers.aspx

anfitchartz.jpg



I'm forced to point out the oil cooler or trans fluid transfer line internal cross sectional area has a potential effect on flow resistance and efficiency,
if you select 1/2" or AN#8 lines they are large enough in cross sectional area too make the transfer line size and length basically non-restrictive.
Id also suggest selecting the longer length, dual oil filters mounted vertically in a rather easy to access area of your choice making replacement easy and less likely to be a messy process.
the longer length oil filters, pleated filtration medium, provide much greater surface area for filtration reducing the flow restriction.

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...ubing-fuel-lines-and-flaring.1030/#post-35905

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...ion-remote-filter-flow-rate.14621/#post-78235

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/thoughts-on-cooling.149/#post-70002

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/transmission-over-temp.12832/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...il-cooler-increases-durability.176/#post-3620



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http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/unwanted-engine-bay-heat.12186/#post-59072

viewtopic.php?f=32&t=151

viewtopic.php?f=38&t=6

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/valve-spring-cooling-via-engine-oil.6491/

OK FIRST LOOK UP THE TRANSMISSIONS FLUID CAPACITY
HERES A LINK


http://fluidcapacity.com/
http://www.cartechbooks.com/techtips/autotransfluid

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...ransmission-holding-bracket.13252/#post-69092

keep in mind most performance cars with an auto transmission and a higher rpm stall converter, will need an auxiliary trans fluid cooler, Id strongly suggest you find one with an electric fan and 1/2" or AN#8 line size as you'll want to allow a minimum of 2 gallons a minute trans fluid flow rate

its CRITICAL to keep the trans fluid clean and ideally changed about every 70K miles and use of a auxiliary cooler that keeps the fluid temp under about 170F is going to extend service life a good deal longer
Ive helped do at least 7 of these big block engine swaps now for other people and obviously results vary with the components being used but most of the swaps required a trans cooler and Ive installed 2 now in the rear tire carrier area, 200f -230f temps on trans fluid are very common on stock transmissions, with stock original engines when your beating the hell out of the trans racing, but 190f-210f on the street while cruising is more common using the stock radiator trans cooler in the lower radiator trans fluid cooler.
I had a larger than original capacity aluminum aftermarket radiator most of the time , in my corvette even with the current 383 sbc, and if I ran a 180f T-stat both the coolant and trans fluid tended to run about 190f UNTIL I swapped to a 3200 stall converter , where the temps jumped noticeably by about 20f higher, if I pushed the car ,but those temps dropped rapidly if I was just cruising in O.D. but I felt I needed a better system, to cool the trans fluid, adding the additional rear mount aux cooler drops temps to 150f-160f with the fan on and about 170f=180f with it off even if Im pushing the car so I wired a switch to the fan, and a sensor that turns the fan on at 175F

http://www.summitracing.com/parts/der-16759

http://static.summitracing.com/global/i ... -16759.pdf
garage25.jpg

cooler+diagram.jpg

faq098.jpg


internal cross sectional area of the fluid transfer lines matters, anything less than 1/2" or AN#8 can be restrictive to flow
Sizing-FittingThreadx.gif


fluidcapk.png

fitsp1.png

fitsp2.png


next time you have the trans oil PAN OFF, WHY NOT WELD or BRAZE IN A TRANSMISSION FLUID DRAIN

https://www.etrailer.com/Accessorie...utm_term=4577129470680387&utm_content=General




 
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philly

solid fixture here in the forum
good stuff, i read the instruction sheet for that switch, seems like a very convenient piece at a fair price.
 

Grumpy

The Grumpy Grease Monkey mechanical engineer.
Staff member
Grumpy, I,ve thought a long time now about installing both a transmission fluid cooler and an oil cooler in my 1995 corvette,
I ran across the thread where you talk about installing a transmission cooler in your 1996 corvette.

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...ans-cooler-on-a-c4-corvette.10514/#post-44478

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...ing-out-a-transmission-rebuilder.10588/page-2

but I have a couple questions,
(1) how do you wire up the fans on the cooler?
(2) how do you determine the correct size oil cooler , and ideally test fit it before you spend over $150-to-$200 on the wrong oil cooler?
(3) where and how do you get the hydraulic lines with the correct AN Fittings custom made to fit?

my 1985 corvette came with a factory oil cooler, that runs engine coolant through separate but contacting internal passages, this warms the oil faster getting it flowing but tends to reduce the heat engine oil can reach as it absorbs oil heat effectively transferring it too the engine coolant on the car, where its transferred too air flow through the radiator, this does a decent job if your cruising but not on a high performance application where a larger transmission fluid cooler does a significantly better job
1985oilc1.jpg

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but I have a couple questions,

READ THE THREAD ABOVE and its sub links carefully again
AND THE LINKED THREADS BELOW, and sub links, in those threads, carefully
I figure I'll go into some detail simply because I see guys buy fluid coolers that are too thick or too tall or wide too fit in the car in the where originally intended.


(1) how do you wire up the fans on the cooler?
SUMMIT AND JEGS have several different adjustable fan controllers with
thermostat's and heat sensors connections and adjustable settings

any time you go to install a additional cooler (s) with electrical fans you,ll want at least 50 amp relays and ideally a 140 amp-200 amp alternator,
individual fluid coolers with fans and controllers are much preferred.
and yes
obviously you need to verify that the cooler and the connecting fluid lines you order will fit the intended location before you order it!
flx-45908_w.jpg


clear.gif
1996 radiator cooling fan relay how to test
Hello all, I have a 1996 Vette LT-4, radiator cooling fans are not coming on. I have checked the fuse panel on the passenger side of the dash, I have also checked the maxi fuses in front on the battery. am now desirous of checking the cooling fan relays, how to do this? thanks in advance for any/all guidance


There are three relays involved.
You can identify the relays by the color of the wires at each relay socket.

Turn the ignition On.
At the relay socket.
Ground the Dark Green wire and both fans should run at low speed.

Ground both the Dark green wire and the Dark Blue wire and both fans should run at hi speed.


1996_Corvette.jpg

every mechanic needs an ANALOG multi meter for testing capacitors with a micro farad scale, AND a DIGITAL MULTI METER

analogmulti.jpg

http://forum.grumpysperformance.com/viewtopic.php?f=36&t=63&p=3403&hilit=vats#p3403
image_6238.jpg

use of a shop manual and multi meter can be very helpful
http://www.harborfreight.com/5-in-1-digital-multimeter-98674.html
READ THIS THREAD

http://forum.grumpysperformance.com/viewtopic.php?f=32&t=3954

fanwire99vv.jpg

READ THESE LINKS AND SUB LINKS
http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/cooling-off-that-c4-corvette.3954/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...-air-conditioner-on-cooling.12232/#post-59597

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...sion-and-oil-cooler-increases-durability.176/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...ans-cooler-on-a-c4-corvette.10514/#post-44478

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/i-need-a-new-lt1-water-pump.10723/

these charts are for the 1985-89 vette cooling fans
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85-89fans3.png

youll also want to think through the cooler location as it must have access to outside air flow and a path for the air that is absorbing and transporting the absorbed heat out and away from the fluid cooler.
keep in mind
engine oil will want to stay in the 195F-215F range
while
trans fluid should ideally be in the 150F-160F range
so a single dual tube cooler design like this pictured below,is less than ideal.
13311.jpg


there are several adjustable temp range fan controllers from several sources available , Id
ideally want the electric wiring and controller(s) installed where it can not be constantly over heated or soaked with splashed water, and obviously having a temperature gauge that accurately shows the transmission fluid and oil temp and oil pressure is mandatory in my opinion

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/digital-dash-swap-questions.3399/#post-26865


http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...electric-fan-in-4-easy-steps.7774/#post-26578

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...g-up-electric-fans-correctly.7150/#post-23981

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/cooling-off-that-c4-corvette.3954/#post-25435

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...oil-cooler-increases-durability.176/#post-210

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...current-flow-grounds-and-more.3504/#post-9220

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...lay-switch-locations-and-info.728/#post-25471

Ive purchased several 200 amp alternators from the guys at
https://www.dbelectrical.com/produc...0-5-7l-7-4l-chevy-truck-93-94-95-200-amp.html
cooler+diagram.jpg


(2) how do you determine the correct size oil cooler , and ideally test fit it before you spend over $150-to-$200 on the wrong oil cooler?
I generally look up the largest surface area and thickest and highest rated fan cfm rated oil cooler with AN#8 line size that will fit the location I want to install it in, AND HAVE ROOM FOR THE LINES AND FITTINGS TO BE CONNECTED TOO IT IN THAT LOCATION, but of course the clearances in most locations will significantly restrict what will fit and function, restricting your choices so do your research home work,
so before you buy a cooler buy a couple sheets of dirt cheap styra-foam panels and stack them to the listed thickness, width and length the catalog lists PLUS at least an extra 1/2" on all dimensions , then add about 2.25" extra on the side the hose fittings are on, when test fitting that block of styra-foam to find out if the cooler you select will fit!
DUCT tape, holds the stacked rectangular block of styra-foam test fit panels,too duplicate the size of the cooler your looking to purchase, and make damn sure you can get that taped stack into, or install it into the intended area before you order the cooler as you damn sure don,t want to have too get a refund or return it , and yes youll need room for the lines and fittings into and out of that fluid cooler.

https://www.summitracing.com/parts/flx-45908

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...ubing-fuel-lines-and-flaring.1030/#post-35905

(3) where and how do you get the hydraulic lines with the correct AN Fittings custom made to fit?
I mock up the lines and accurately measure, the lines , I generally use dirt cheap clear vinyl 1/2" ID tube with old AN, fittings that I bring to a local hydraulic hose supply for them to duplicate similar hoses length hoses after I,ve test fitted out of fairly commonly available 350F temp and 350 psi hydraulic hose
 
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Grumpy

The Grumpy Grease Monkey mechanical engineer.
Staff member
example
lets assume you really want this $180 ,
trans fluid or oil cooler,
you'll want too stop and think things carefully and measure accurately
its never a bad idea to measure the oil and transmission fluid temps during your cars operation, this is the most consistently accurate I.R temp gun I've used for testing

42545.jpg

http://www.testequipmentdepot.com/e...1100200223789&utm_content=All Extech Products
INFRARED TEMP GUN
Wide temperature range from -58 to 1832°F (-50 to 1000°C)
any time that your dealing with a potential temperature issue or a trouble issue where , knowing the exact temperature vs what a gauge might say, it helps to have a handy and accurate infrared temp gun handy to locate and confirm heat, levels.
https://www.summitracing.com/parts/flx-45908
flx-45908_w.jpg

Summit Racing Part Number:FLX-45908

Overall Height (in):10.500 in.

Overall Width (in):15.000 in.

Overall Thickness (in):4.000 in.

Flex-a-lite's fan-equipped, heavy-duty remote coolers offer a great combination of cooling power and freedom of mounting location, all at down-to-earth prices. Their tube-and-fin design is made up of efficient aluminum fins and multi-pass copper tubing. With their attached 800 cfm electric fans, they don't have to be mounted in direct airflow to work. They make their own breeze. So you can put them in just about any convenient, reasonable place and they'll still get the job done. There also are dual-circuit versions that accommodate two different fluids--such as engine oil and automatic-transmission fluid--in the same-size cooler. That's especially good for applications where space is limited or cooling needs for the fluids concerned aren't extreme. A manual control switch, air-conditioning override switch, and GatorClip mounting clips are available separately.
in this case you would make a test styra-foam block
10.75" tall
17.25"-to-17.5" wide
4.25" thick

if that fits where you intend to fit the fluid cooler you have a great indicator it will fit
obviously the cooler needs to mount to something sturdy so ideally the mount stand or brackets you custom fabricate will have it firmly and solidly located where you intended it to be!
(you'll want to order a GAUGE an ADJUSTABLE FAN CONTROL RELAY/CONTROLLER
SEPARATELY, and once you've verified clearances you order the components then measure and get custom lines fabricated

I see some guys use the finned heat sink style fluid coolers
(question) why did you select and use the heat sink vs a true fan equipped trans or oil fluid cooler
cost is similar , it looks like you have the requited clearance and the fan/radiator style cooler is far more efficient?
yes I'm aware the heat sink, finned aluminum fluid coolers work reasonably well in most stock applications, especially if the coolant also flows through the lower radiator
cooler+diagram.jpg

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http://www.jegs.com/i/Moroso/710/41...MIpJXP5vXm2QIVF57ACh37QQ1MEAQYASABEgI8ZfD_BwE

http://www.jegs.com/i/Flex-A-Lite/400/45901/10002/-1

400-45901.jpg


 
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