yes the oil filter you sellect does make a differance

Discussion in 'Oil and Lube Systems' started by grumpyvette, Sep 18, 2008.

  1. grumpyvette

    grumpyvette Administrator Staff Member

    READ THRU THESE SUB LINKS CAREFULLY
    theres a great deal of info here to look thru. pay attention to filter construction and the filter materials and total filter medium area, when discussing oil filters keep in mind their intended function, which is mostly too efficiently trap and remove particulate and metallic debris circulating in the oil flow,from various sources like wear, and outside dirt, to prevent it from reaching the oil film supported surfaces in the bearings and valve train.

    DON,T IGNORE THE LINKS THEY CONTAIN A GREAT DEAL OF INFO

    read the links and sub-links

    http://www.amsoil.com/lookup/auto-and-light-truck/?zo=531421&page=/products/application_guide.aspx

    http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/unwanted-engine-bay-heat.12186/#post-59072

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    To make a long story short, the researchers had this to say:
    There are basically six mfgs of oil filters for all the high volume filters sold in the USA. Baldwin/Hastings,Champion Labs,Dana/Wix, Donaldson, Honeywell and Purolator. not counting the imported , and mostly off brand stuff.
    "Abrasive engine wear can be substantially reduced with an increase in filter single pass efficiency. Compared to a 40 micron filter, engine wear was reduced by 50 percent with 30 micron filtration. Likewise, wear was reduced by 70 percent with 15 micron filtration."
    By combining this type of oil filtration with the superior protection and cleanliness of a premium synthetic oil, you will virtually eliminate engine wear.
    obviously filters with more effective filtration will need to have larger surface areas and be changed more frequently to maintain high flow rates.
    some filters have less than 200 square inches of filter area and are poorly constructed, some more than 480 square inches of filter area and much better construction, make up your mind after looking at the facts, depending on advertizing is misleading, remember the size of the pores (holes in the filter medium) and the number of the pores or the thickness of the filter medium varies a great deal between brands, generally the more surface area and the smaller the pore micron reading and the more pores per square inch the better the filter will be at trapping crud in the oil, but once a filter starts clogging those filter pores its reducing its flow potential and as a result it tends to increase resistance to oil flow rates.
    oil turns dark in color mostly as a result of suspended contaminants like soot, and some filter elements have a filter medium that is far less likely to trap fine contaminants, or have a bye-pass valve that allows a high percentage of oil to bye-pass the filter medium
    a highly effective oil filter will need to be changed frequently because the more crap it traps the more restrictive it becomes meaning the oil filter will eventually clog and once the difference between incoming oil pressure exceeds about 8 psi some or in a few cases most of the oil flow bye-passes the filter medium thru that by pass valve.
    a filter with a courser, more porous medium may not clog as easily but it allows much higher quantity's of fine soot to constantly circulate.
    theres a trade-off a more porous filter may trap most of the larger contaminants and not clog up but allow fine crud like soot to darken the oil quickly, a filter medium with better filtration may need changing more frequently or it will eventually start bye-passing a percentage of the oil flow as the resistance increases due to more clogged pours in the filter medium
    construction with paper end caps, minimal filter area, and lack of anti drain back valves should generally be avoided,
    metal end caps synthetic filter medium and silicone or plastic anti drain back valves help insure oil filter performance

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    for those of you who hate reading Id suggest the LONGER WIX filters as a good value in an oil filter
    if you have a reasonably friendly NAPA parts counter guy ask him to look up the longer length version of what ever WIX oil filter fits your particular engine,IF YOU HAVE THE ROOM TO INSTALL A LONGER FILTER in most cases theres several filter lengths and the longer versions add capacity, cooling and increase filter medium surface area, all good things especially if you need to trap potential sludge build up or metallic debris, buy a decent strong, constantly re-useable magnet to attach to the bottom of the filter and you significantly increase its ability to remove crud even further.

    http://www.kjmagnetics.com/proddetail.asp?prod=RZ0X84
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    Micron Inches
    10 0.00039
    25
    0.00098
    30
    0.00118
    40 0.00157
    VIDEOS





    heres a helpful diagnostic tool,

    http://www.minimopar.net/oilfilters/reference.html


    http://www.oilfilter-crossreference.com/

    http://www.summitracing.com/parts/sum-900510/overview/

    http://www.aircraftspruce.com/menus/fb/ ... tters.html

    http://www.circletrack.com/enginetech/c ... ilter_fun/

    http://www.summitracing.com/parts/SUM-9 ... toview=sku
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    not everything that passes through the oil pump gets trapped in the oil filter medium

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    its basically a heavy duty can opener , or an oil filter cutter , is designed to make it easy to internally inspect oil filters, by allowing you to remove the filter element , from inside the surrounding (CAN) for close visual inspection.

    viewtopic.php?f=54&t=120&p=28636&hilit=magnets+screens#p28636
    just as a quick reference
    http://www.wixfilters.com/Lookup/Applic ... ?Section=1
    1996 corvette LT1
    wix 51036
    1985 corvette L98
    wix51069
    1969 corvette L88
    wix 51069

    http://www.oilfilter-crossreference.com ... /Wix/31372

    http://www.purolatorautofilters.net/res ... Guide.aspx

    viewtopic.php?f=54&t=2080&p=5568&hilit=longer+filter#p5568

    keep in mind that as oil temps increase the oil viscosity tends to decrease, thus cold oil, at lets say 70F might cause the oil pressure gauge to read 50 psi at idle but the pressure reading slowly goes down to 25 psi once the oils reached lets say 210F, this is normal and expected
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    http://www.gmtruckcentral.com/articles/ ... esheet.htm

    http://www.gmtruckcentral.com/articles/ ... uction.htm

    http://wetwesties1.tripod.com/oilfilterstudy/index.html

    http://www.71protouringchevelle.com/Eng ... rstudy.htm

    http://www.gmtruckcentral.com/articles/ ... study.html

    http://minimopar.knizefamily.net/oilfil ... e.html#wix



    viewtopic.php?f=54&t=3536

    http://www.aloha34.com/information/oilfiltertable.pdf

    http://www.circletrack.com/enginetech/c ... ilter_fun/

    http://www.synlube.com/oilfilters.htm

    http://www.circletrack.com/enginetech/c ... ilter_fun/

    http://www.ttalk.info/Zddp.htm

    http://www.synlube.com/oilfilters.htm

    http://royalpurple.com/rp-oil-filter.html

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hsQ2LbHG ... re=related

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IH4PejX9 ... re=related



    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EAmfwTvZ ... re=related

    http://www.aloha34.com/information/oilfiltertable.pdf

    viewtopic.php?f=54&t=2080

    http://people.msoe.edu/~yoderw/oilfilte ... study.html

    http://minimopar.knizefamily.net/oilfilters/index.html
    BTW, , on BIG BLOCKS the oil pumps and oil filter adapters are different due to the block oil filter recess and rear seals being different
    GEN 4 or MARK IV
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    GEN V and VI
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    Micron Inches
    10 0.00039
    25
    0.00098
    30
    0.00118
    40 0.00157
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    BTW on the high volume pump versus the standard pump,
    what Im saying is basically this...
    first the MYTH
    ,"HIGH VOLUME OIL PUMPS HEAT YOUR OIL"
    OIL PUMPS, EVEN WHEN RUNNING AT MAX PRESSURE AND BY_PASSING A SIGNIFICANT PERCENTAGE OF OIL BACK THRU THE PUMP, YET THEY DO NOT ADD SIGNIFICANT HEAT TO THE OIL, metallic debris from a cam lobe failure potentially destroying bearings,is a potential problem with the newer oils designed not for flat tappet but roller tappet engines that contain less friction reducers like ZDDP, most guys think the oil filter would prevent that, but forget that all that metallic debris passed thru the oil pump well before it reaches the filter and circulated in the oil pan getting thrown randomly around as the crank spins , before entering the oil pump, plus the oil pump bye-pass and oil filter bye-pass both tend to allow metallic debris to pass thru if clogged with crud from a failed cam lob, lifter or bearings .

    yes the BYE-PASS IN THE OIL FILTER DOES normally open on cold mornings, or under rapid changes in engine rpms, especially before the heat from the engine lowers the oils effective viscosity, Im fairly sure you have heard or remember hearing advise not to go doing stupid stuff like burn outs in your drive way until the engines reached and maintains operational temps
    (usually oil and coolant has reached 190F-215F) well one big reason is that thicker oil viscosity when oils cooler ,takes a good deal more pressure to force thru the filter medium, once the oils fairly hot it flows better, and requires less pressure as it offers less resistance to flow thru the engines clearances and thru the filter, that in turn means that hot oil with its thinner effective viscosity tends to be far less likely to force open the filter bye-pass circuit and that means oil bye-passing the filter medium is far less likely to drag metallic trash held in suspension with it to reach the bearings to cause more rapid wear.

    almost all engine heat comes from three sources
    (1)COMBUSTION,(about 60%)

    (2)FRICTION in the rotating assembly and valve train,
    and
    (3) VALVE SPRINGS FLEXING, (combined about 40%)

    if you push the oil at a high enough pressure and volume across the bearing surfaces,you can absorb and transfer heat out of the bearings very efficiently. the limited ,flow of stock oil pump volume , will not absorb or move as much heat out of the bearings ,compared to the higher , volume oil pump, can potentially. the oil pumped by the aftermarket larger volume of oil pumped, passing over the surface will , by moving more oil, thru the clearances move more heat out of the bearings,heat thats absorbed and transferred is transferred at higher,rate, as a higher total amount of heat,is absorbed heat transfer per oil volume in contact with the bearing surfaces, is lower.
    that poses three minor potential problems that might be major potential problem depending on the temp. range and oil quality (mineral versus synthetic)

    (1)as the oil volume passing over the bearing surface, and valve train, heats up it can absorb a lower percentage of the bearings heat, so keeping the oil much cooler than the bearings is critical, so maintaining a large volume oif oil and allowing it to cool, or dissipate the heat is absorbed is critical to the whole process.
    having a larger capacity oil pan and if required an oil cooler with aux electric fan is a good idea.

    (2)as oil heats up it breaks down, and by the time mineral base oils hit 260 degrees they have lost significant lubrication, while the better synthetics break down slower and have a higher heat tolerance.

    (3)oil picks up and carries micro trash (carbon,acids, metallic dust,etc.) that can embed in the bearing surfaces, a slightly higher pressure and volume flowing across the bearing surfaces Tends to keep them cleaner because the FILTERED oil PUSHED OVER THE BEARING SURFACES tends to be run through the FILTER more often
    so if your pushing 20% more oil at 10% greater pressure across the bearings the oil will tend heat slower,have a greater time in the cooling off cycle and stabilize at a lower total heat absorb ion level, because each unit of oil spends less time in the bearings being heated

    what most of the guys that tell you a stock pump is all you'll ever need, FORGET to TELL you is that
    the high volume pumps pump oil to the bearings faster at start up, helping to prevent wear, pump ONLY what the engines CLEARANCES ALLOW, have a more constant pressure level, and they also don,t seem to understand that the hydraulic lifters in most engines have internal valves that limit the oil flow volume,to the upper engine, in almost every case where someone says the valve covers fill up at high RPMs, your talking to someone whos just repeating something they heard, or someone whos FAILED to CORRECTLY PREP THE BLOCK AND/OR USE A WINDAGE SCREEN not someone that's actually tested the engine to see if what they are talking about is true

    think it thru ..Hydrodynamics pressure is resistance to flow
    so higher viscosity more resistance = higher pressure
    if the oil pressure changed and nothing but the filter used was different then the filter with the higher pressure is restricting oil flow, it sure can,t be the bearing clearances, oil pump, etc, those remained constant/un-changed


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    removing the plug has zero effect on oil pressure, its only purpose is to insure FILTERED oil most of the time reaches the bearings as the plug forces oil thru the filter element UNLESS the filter has a bye-pass valve thats opening due to a 10-20psi difference in oil pressure

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    first gen small block oiling
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    LSI/LS6 OIL ROUTING THRU BLOCK
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    It could easily be that your dealing with far less total surface area on the fram filter, which could easily be what reduces flow rates, and increases pressure.
    it could be that fram filters medium has finer filter medium,that clogs faster, and in theory catches finer size crud, but most filters are designed to capture a fairly standard size range of contaminants

    if the filter elements IDENTICAL and the one filter has 200 inches of filter medium vs lets say 350 for a different filter there should be a reduced restriction to flow of about 57% with the larger surface area with identical filtration, well that is of course with brand mew filters, obviously the smaller filter area will clog much faster as it gets filled with crud in the pores of the filter medium.
    but keep in mind the surface area of the filters, and physical construction vary by brand and part number and so does the materials and drain back valve construction.
    Ive used purorlator , mobile 1 and WIX filters on most engines and I personally avoid fram filters ,just remember to change filters fairly regularly, like every 4500-5000 miles or so
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    related info

    viewtopic.php?f=54&t=117

    viewtopic.php?f=54&t=2187

    viewtopic.php?f=54&t=3536

    viewtopic.php?f=54&t=10380&p=42887#p42887

    viewtopic.php?f=54&t=3834
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    read this part of that big post above

    now what does quite frequently happen is that the guys installing a high volume oil pump just swap out the standard pump, reinstall the stock or similar pick-up and bolt on the pan with the pick-up in the stock position on the oil pump. the stock pick-up is mounted about 3/8" off the pan bottom,the high volume pump is normally equipped with impeller gears about .3 inches longer than stock, the high volume pump body is that much lower in the pan, resulting in the pick-up being only about 1/8" from the pan bottom. the result is that on a normal Chevy oil pump pick-up this leave a space of about 1/8" x 2.5" for oil to flow into the pump. at low rpms this works but as the rpms climb the pick-up that can,t get any oil to pump cavitation as it spins and fails to pump oil, result oil pressure drops until rpms are lowered no matter how much oil is over the pick-up............ valve covers never get and hold more than about 1/3 to 2/3 of a quart each even at 8000 rpm (high speed photography by SMOKEY YUNICK doing stock car engine research with clear plastic valve covers prove that

    BTW WHILE WE ARE TALKING ABOUT OIL SYSTEMS, just some info, see these remote adapters, a fairly common reason people install high volume pumps is to use these remote adapters

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    well a fairly common way to kill an engine is to INCORRECTLY install one of these remote filter adapter kits,
    look at the top picture and keep in mind that those two connecting hoses COULD be flipped as to what end(in/out ) on the remote filters gets hooked to the bypass adapter (IN/OUT) ports, hook it up correctly and everything works just fine! but swap the two hoses on only one end and YOUR OIL PUMP tries to push OIL PAST the ANTI-DRAIN BACK VALVES on the oil filters,(and most of the time is marginally successful in that a trickle of oil does get to the bearings and rocker arms at idle) now at idle you'll still get good oil pressure (about 15 lbs) but rev the engine and the highly restricted oil flow pressure goes up very slowly but the oil VOLUME getting into the block is so low you'll spin a bearing in about the first 20 minutes ( and 99% of the time the guy that does this blames the guy who built his engine for putting it together WRONG when in fact the engine could have been PERFECT but with no oil reaching the bearings under load the engine is history within at best about an hours running time!

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    keep in mind oil accumulates soot and acids over time, and even the fine black soot , most filters won,t strain out causes wear, so oil needs to be changed, even if its well filtered
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    even if the bye pass is open or blocked much of the oil goes thru the filter

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    oil flows thru the path of least resistance and the filter element provides a low level of resistance because with a decent brand oil filter has 350-400 plus sq inches of surface area .that will easily pass fluids thru holes that can maybe trap 20 micron trash at best, to a fluid , with a 3-6 psi difference in pressure pushing it,millions of 15 micron or larger holes in the filter element look like a chain link fence

    HERES WHAT THAT OIL FILTER ELEMENT LOOKS LIKE UNDER A MICROSCOPE
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    TYPICAL PAPER ELEMENT
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    TYPICAL synthetic fiber mesh ELEMENT
    viewtopic.php?f=54&t=117

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    one more potential possible source of metallic debris that could provide the cause of the cylinder bore damage
    now if your building an engine you GOING TO DO FREQUENT OIL CHANGES ON AND NEVER LET SLUDGE BUILD UP...you can probably limit that potential valve train shrapnel screens and magnets that trap small destructive crud

    http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/which-oil-what-viscosity.1334/

    what many people don,t seem to understand is that all oil degrades over time and collects micro trash, thus its regular replacement and a good quality oil filtration system is required.
    even the best oil looses its ability to function over time with repeated heat/cooling and molecular shear stress, thus replacement and good filtration on a regular basis is mandatory , Id strongly suggest a new oil filter and oil change at a max of 8-10K miles

    [​IMG]
    THE SCREEN ABOVE IS CLOSE TO BEING IDEAL
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    THE SCREEN ABOVE IS TOO SMALL TO BE IDEAL

    SHRAPNEL SCREENS LIKE THE ONE ABOVE ARE FAR TO FINE TO ALLOW DECENT OIL RETURN RATES ONCE OIL STARTS TO GET A BIT OF VARNISH OR SLUDGE FORMING
    [​IMG]
    while I generally use stainless 6 or 8 mesh screens theres lots of options that will work just fine, just remember to keep the oil changed regularly or theres some potential for sludge to clog ANY size shrapnel screens
    http://www.twpinc.com/twpinc/products/T ... 6T0350W36T
    http://www.twpinc.com/twpinc/products/T ... 8S0280W36T



    READ THESE THREADS

    viewtopic.php?f=54&t=120&p=150&hilit=magnets#p150

    viewtopic.php?f=51&t=1458&p=3265&hilit=shrapnel#p3265

    viewtopic.php?f=51&t=1458&p=3265&hilit=screens#p3265

    http://www.kjmagnetics.com/proddetail.asp?prod=D66SH

    viewtopic.php?f=54&t=4558&p=12165&hilit=+longer+filter+number#p12165


    http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...king-how-other-people-might.11959/#post-56957

    viewtopic.php?f=54&t=120&p=867&hilit=screens+magnets#p867
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 14, 2019
  2. grumpyvette

    grumpyvette Administrator Staff Member

    General Filter Facts - Oil Filters
    Since 1954 when we patented the first spin-on oil filter, WIX Filters has been at the forefront of oil filter technology and performance for passenger cars, light trucks, heavy trucks and buses, and off-highway vehicles. SAE J806 tests prove that WIX oil filters hold 45% more dirt than the leading national brand - meaning we keep filtering long after the competition has completely quit. Use our Filter Look-up feature or consult you nearest WIX distributor using our Where To Buy to find the best WIX oil filter for your needs.
    What the Oil Filter Does...
    You may take your oil filter for granted, but this small, inexpensive part of your vehicle's lubrication system plays a vital role in protecting the engine from premature wear. Each moving part in the engine and the cylinder walls requires clean oil for proper lubrication and lasting life. The oil filter cleans the oil as it passes through the filter element or filtering media. This prevents abrasive contaminants in the engine lubrication system from damaging engine parts.

    The better you understand your engine's lubrication system, the more you'll appreciate the vital role your oil filter plays. When the engine is running, oil enters the oil pump through a screened intake. The screened intake -- or oil pick-up -- is located in the crankcase near the bottom surface of the oil pan. The oil is drawn through the screen intake and forced by the oil pump through the oil filter.

    Oil from the main gallery is also fed through vertical passages to the crankshaft main bearings and through the crankshaft to the rod bearings. Oil thrown from the crankshaft, or sprayed from the connecting rods, lubricates the pistons and cylinder walls.

    In a typical full-flow type oil filter, the oil flows into an inlet passage and then through the filtering element. After flowing through the filter element, the filtered or "clean" oil passes directly to the main oil gallery. In a partial-flow type filter, the oil returns directly to the oil pan.

    Oil from the main gallery lubricates the camshaft and the camshaft bearings (and feeds hydraulic valve lifters if used in the engine). On non-overhead cam engines, oil is metered through the valve lifter to a hollow push rod that carries oil for the lubrication of the push rod pivot point, rocker arm pivots and valve guide.
    Oil Filter Media
    The media is the filtering material in the oil filter element. It essentially determines the efficiency, performance and useful life of the oil filter.

    There are two basic types of filter media: the "paper" media and the "depth" type media. The primary features of the filter elements are:

    Particle size retention (filtration efficiency)
    Particle size retention is the measure of the degree to which the filter can retain particles of various sizes. Wix has developed optimum particle size retention quality in filter media by extensive engine wear tests including exhaustive testing of filters used in racing, and sophisticated laboratory tests. Wix media in the automotive full-flow oil filter is able to trap and hold essentially all the contaminant particles larger than 25 microns. (A human hair measures approximately 70 microns in diameter. An object that is 1 micron in size is .000039 inches in diameter.) Our filters also capture a high percentage of even smaller particles.

    Dirt-holding capacity
    Dirt-holding capacity is the amount of contaminant that can be removed and held by the filter until the filter ceases to function. The capacity of Wix filters is significantly larger than the minimum requirements to efficiently filter all the oil during the oil and filter change periods as specified by vehicle manufacturers.

    Resistance to oil flow
    WIX full-flow oil filters for automotive applications use arch-pleated, prescription-blended media. When new, the media with a maximized number of pleats has less than 2 psi pressure drop when filtering oil at a rate of 4 g.p.m. at normal operating temperature. This low initial restriction to oil flow protects the vital engine parts more effectively.
    Parts of an Oil Filter
    Gasket - provides exterior seal between the filter and engine at the engine mounting surface.
    Mounting Plate - prevents deflection (movement) at the gasket sealing surface. Heavy gage steel plate provides for threaded attachment to the engine.
    Inner Element Support - provides inner element stabilization and a positive seal between the inner element and the mounting plate to prevent the bypass of unfiltered oil.
    Upper End Cap - retains element end sealant and filter media, provides an outlet for clean oil, and provides structural rigidity to the pleated media.
    Lower End Cap - retains element end sealant and filter media.
    Arch-pleated, Prescription-blended Filter Media - provides a more than adequate filter area. The element has a controlled porosity blended media to assure complete filtration of the oil.
    Spiral-wound Center Tube - provides internal element support. The spiral design greatly reduces initial flow restriction when compared to other designs.
    Coiled Spring - ensures a constant load on the inner element to maintain the seal between the upper element end cap, the inner element support, and the mounting plate even during pressure surge situations.
    Filter Canister - encloses the assembly with a mechanically-locked double seam. The canister provides "flutes" at the closed end for ease of removal with an oil filter wrench.
    Silicone Anti-Drainback Valve - Stays flexible in extreme temperatures, improves oil flow and keeps oil in filter to prevent engine destroying dry starts. Also provides lasting protection to meet new vehicle manufacturers longer recommended oil change schedules. Nitrile valves can harden and become ineffective over time.

    Some WIX full-flow filters include anti-drainback and/or filter by-pass valves. These types of filters are identical to full-flow filters, except that a by-pass valve replaces the inner element support and an anti-drainback valve has been added. The Anti-Drainback Valve prevents oil from draining out of the filter inlet holes when the engine is shut off. It also provides seal between clean and dirty oil at the upper end cap. This is necessary in applications where the oil filter is mounted in a horizontal or inverted position.

    The Filter By-Pass Valve
    If a WIX full-flow filter becomes "clogged", or excessively restrictive to oil flow, the filter by-pass valve ensures continued engine lubrication by allowing the oil to by-pass the filter. Some vehicle manufacturers have the by-pass valve built into the oil filter mounting unit (located on the engine).

    Other vehicle manufacturers require full-flow filters have the by-pass valve built into the filter itself. All Wix oil filter types recommended for these particular applications include the by-pass valve assembly in the filter.

    By-pass Valve Assembly -- spring loaded valve assembly that allows oil to by-pass the element under high-differential pressure conditions such as cold oil and/or excessively contaminated media. This allows lubrication of the engine, but without full-flow filtration.

    youll occasionally see guys post things about some brands ,stated that would have you believe all filters made by a certain manufacturer are trash or great,
    example,
    Fram puts out several lines of oil filters,and youll find info strongly suggesting they are less than ideal quality.
    like a great many other things being built, by large corporations, theres a common perception based on decades of people using,the least expensive product that brand name produces (which probably accounts for the vast percentage of sales volume) that does not take into account the old adage,
    that you tend to get what you pay for.
    and an almost total ignorance in the general public that.
    theres several levels of PRICE and QUALITY being sold under the one blanket brand name.
    FRAM DOES SELL A BETTER QUALITY OIL FILTER LINE
    http://www.fram.com/oil-filters/fram-ultra-synthetic-oil-filter.aspx
    THAT DOES NOT mean they are the best available but they are certainly a noticeable step up in quality from the low price line

    that of course does nearly nothing, for you,
    if you insist on purchasing their low price line of cheap oil .
    vs selecting the more expensive and significantly better made,
    but more costly product line

    obviously buying an oil filter can opener tool, and doing some close personal inspection of what your dealing with won,t hurt.
    http://www.summitracing.com/parts/sum-900510/overview/
    [​IMG]
    http://www.summitracing.com/parts/pro-66490/overview/
    [​IMG]
    Id also point out that manufacturer's PAY famous racers for endorsements
    Id also point out that an engine used in racing will generally get the oil changed rather frequently while a street driven car may go 10-20 times more miles between oil changes

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    longer length oil filters with significantly more pleets and synthetic mediums have significantly lower resistance to oil flow reducing pumping losses slightly, but a couple horse power gained here and faster oil flow helps durability, and cooling of the bearings and valve train
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    [​IMG]


    http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...ilter-you-sellect-does-make-a-differance.117/

    http://www.minimopar.net/oilfilters/reference.html


    a bit of research shows you some facts to base opinion on and actual testing and inspection comparing a product to its likely competition would be rather useful, dealing in facts sure beats guessing

    http://www.dslreports.com/forum/r21883344-Tech-Review-The-Long-Waited-FRAM-OIL-FILTER-REVIEW

    WATCH THIS LINK FIRST








     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 15, 2016
  3. grumpyvette

    grumpyvette Administrator Staff Member

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    heres a helpful diagnostic tool,[/color]

    http://www.circletrack.com/enginetech/c ... ilter_fun/
    http://www.summitracing.com/parts/SUM-9 ... toview=sku

    http://www.magnet4sale.com/smco-magnets-dia-1-2x1-4-samarium-cobalt-magnets-608f-temperature/
    [​IMG]

    its basically a heavy duty can opener , or an oil filter cutter designed to make it easy to internally inspect oil filters, by allowing you to remove the filter element , from inside the surrounding (CAN) for close visual inspection. if you've got more than a tiny bit of metallic crud in the filter theres a good chance some is embedded in bearings or partly clogging oil passages
    If you don,t have one, and have not used one, your unlikely to see, or appreciate the benefits,close inspection can and does frequently give you prior evidence of impending or at least gradually occurring wear and with practice you can make an excellent guess as to the parts and condition of those components.
    IT also helps to trap crud if you install a couple high temp magnets on the filter and in the oil pan.

    [​IMG]
    now the obvious question I see posted frequently is
    "just what can I expect to see if the engines breaking in correctly vs what will I see if the engines got problems"

    well if you think about it its totally normal for a new engine to break loose small metallic dust as components wear or lap in , like lifters to cam lobes and rings to cylinder walls etc. so expect to see a small amount of fine metallic dust, what you should not see is obvious bits of bearing materials, or significant glitter like metallic debris in the oil or magnets covered in fine "FUR LIKE DUST" if you have to look hard to find metallic trash in the oil filter pleats your most likely doing fine, if the filter medium is coated or covered with debris youve got serious issues


    http://www.machinerylubrication.com/Rea ... r-analysis









    yes the quality varys a great deal between brands

    http://filtrationcomparisons.weebly.com ... ation.html

    http://filtrationcomparisons.weebly.com ... sults.html

    http://store.summitracing.com/partdetai ... toview=sku
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    If your serious about maintaining peak engine durability you should invest in this tool, its basically a heavy duty can opener ,you mount under your work bench that allows you to easily open used oil filters, or an oil filter cutter designed to make it easy to internally inspect oil filters, by allowing you to remove the filter element , from inside the surrounding (CAN) for close visual inspection.
    If you don,t have one, and have not used one, your unlikely to see, or appreciate the benefits,close inspection can and does frequently give you prior evidence of impending or at least gradually occurring wear and with practice you can make an excellent guess as to the parts and condition of those components.
    IT also helps to trap crud if you install a couple high temp magnets on the filter and in the oil pan.
    Regular oil changes can drastically reduce the amount of sludge buildup in the oil.
    Basic filter cutting & inspection procedures, its best to catch problems BEFORE they get expensive and inspecting your oil filter can usually help locate wear issues early
    viewtopic.php?f=54&t=120
    [​IMG]
    you would be amazed at the sludge build up in some engines

    · Visually check the filter and or filter canister for cracks and leaks.

    · Inspect the filter`s bypass valve to ensure it is operating correctly.

    · Drain the filter of its contents (dispose of this liquid in the correct manner in accordance with local environmental guidelines).

    · Firmly hold the filter in an upright position (head on top) taking care not to crush or damage the housing.

    · Using a specially designed filter cutting tool (for example, Komatsu part number 3310587S )

    heres a helpful diagnostic tool,
    [​IMG]
    carefully cut off the top of the filter.

    · Remove the element from the filter housing and pour the contents of the housing onto some clean absorbent paper.

    · Inspect the absorbent paper for traces of foreign particles.

    · Inspect the filter medium for signs of damage and blockages. Blockages force the bypass valve into operation, allowing unfiltered fluid to travel to and enter major components.

    · Remove the filter medium from the filter by cutting between 2030 mm (about one inch) from the end plate and cut the medium into small pieces.

    · Carefully inspect the filter medium for traces of metal contaminants.

    Most engine trouble involves the lube system, and cutting waste filters apart often reveals warning signs that will help avert major damage. As a disposable element of the system, the filter sometimes acts as a fuse, calling attention to problems by failing before engine components are damaged. Problems associated with wear in the combustion chamber inevitably show up in the oil, and the filter collects clues. Field maintenance operations that take time to read the signs will have another tool for anticipating failures and reducing repair costs.
    [​IMG]
    http://www.machinerylubrication.com/Rea ... inspection

    http://www.tomorrowstechnician.com/Arti ... lters.aspx

    http://www.tomorrowstechnician.com/Arti ... lures.aspx

    [​IMG]
    http://www.summitracing.com/parts/SUM-9 ... toview=sku

    http://www.circletrack.com/techarticles ... index.html


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    yes mobile one now sells an oil they say allows one a year oil changes
    it costs about $7.50 to $14 a QUART,
    (TRY TO GET IT AT WALMART,
    it tends to be cheaper in 5 quart containers)
    so I think its more of a MARKETING PLOY than anything else.
    If we look at things realistically the vast majority of the public rarely bothers with actually doing regular scheduled oil changes.
    I think this will give some people an excuse to further extend the time lag in oil change frequency,
    and it may help others if it does have a robust and durable additive package!
    but the thing that kills lots of engines is the fact that ALL oil traps and circulates combustion gases and soot!
    that contaminates and reduces the oils ability to lubricate, changing the oil flushes out the majority of the trapped contaminates.
    oil filters trap and hold the larger crap, circulating in the oil suspension, but over time the filter loses that ability, so it needs to be changed out.
    If your going to extend the time between oil changes then I'd still suggest swapping out oil filters at least every 10k-12K miles,
    but if you really give a damn about your engines durability, Id simply change to new oil while your under the car changing out the oil filters at that time!

    related info

    viewtopic.php?f=54&t=10380

    viewtopic.php?f=51&t=2919

    viewtopic.php?f=44&t=799&p=1161&hilit=+filter+select#p1161

    viewtopic.php?f=54&t=3834&p=10199&hilit=+filter+oil#p10199

    viewtopic.php?f=54&t=117

    viewtopic.php?f=54&t=3519&p=9289&hilit=+filter+oil#p9289

    viewtopic.php?f=54&t=2080&p=5568&hilit=+filter+oil#p5568


    btw, add a few magnets to the oil pan and drain back area in your engine, the trap and hold metalic dust that comes from wear and increase engine life span by preventing that crap embedding in the bearings

    http://www.kjmagnetics.com/proddetai...d=D66SH&cat=13

    http://www.kjmagnetics.com/proddetail.asp?prod=D66SH

    http://www.kjmagnetics.com/proddetail.asp?prod=D82SH

    these are even more tollerant of temp swings and retain strength at even higher engine oil temps plus they are smaller and easier to use

    The SH material in the D66SH magnets, means that the magnets can be heated to 300° F without any loss of magnetic strength, unlike standard neodymium magnets that begin to lose strength at 175° F. Suitable for many high temperature applications.

    http://www.centuryperformance.com/tunin ... g-148.html

    http://www.secondchancegarage.com/public/186.cfm

    http://www.corvette-101.com/
    (info on left border)
    http://www.summitracing.com/search/?key ... kers&dds=1

    there ARE reduced ratio roller rockers designed to significantly lower the lifter to lobe pressures during the cam break-in process, and its a whole lot easier to swap rockers during the break-in process than swap to lower pressure springs or remove inner springs from dual spring valve trains during the break in process

    heres a couple darn good links you need to read thru, lets have some additional info or comments and questions??
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 11, 2018
  4. grumpyvette

    grumpyvette Administrator Staff Member

    WIX long truck filter (2qt, part #51794)
    http://fmsfilters.com/products/oil-filt ... 7QodwhwMtw
    AC PF35, which is about 5.5 inches long

    Napa 1794, for Wix, just add a 5 in

    "1 qt" NAPA filter can be FIL-1060 (silicone anti-drainback valve) or FIL-1061 (no anti-drainback valve) Wix 51060/51061

    Strangely, the one with the drainback valve costs less than the one without. About $6.69 for the 1060 (list price, you may get a discount.)

    Either of them is "about" 5 1/8" tall.

    https://www.napaonline.com/Catalog/Cata ... 0192928564

    https://www.napaonline.com/Catalog/Cata ... 0320242619


    WATCH THESE VIDEOS, look at evidence and make up your own mind with facts



    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hNDpzyu0 ... re=related



    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hsQ2LbHG ... re=related

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oCBr4YfQ ... re=related

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rIx4Y3Tv ... re=related

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=klcBRnyC ... re=related

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kX0xrqvl ... re=related



    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=56JfXs_5 ... re=related

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NRbDfhgO ... re=related

    theres several good brands of very acceptable oil filters, Im sure someone will post )"ANYTHING BUT A FRAM" but its not that simple ,

    BOSCH, K&N,MAHLE,PUROLATOR, MOBILE-ONE,WIX, are all decent choices, but be aware that physically LONGER filters and filters with high plete counts tend to have more filter medium surface area and paper medium is generally not as effective as the synthetic mat filter mediums, but the main issue is most guys don,t replace the oil and oil filters regularly.
    MAGNETS help a good deal





     
    Last edited: May 8, 2015
  5. Indycars

    Indycars Administrator Staff Member


    When the filter mounts in a vertical position, like on Chevys, then it's a moot
    point to have an anti-drainback valve ..... right??? If anything it
    provides another failure point or adds to the restriction of the filter to oil flow.

    If a filter has a bypass valve, it has to work on differential pressure across the
    filter or is it something else??? And what are those numbers typically???

    Watched this on youtube, pretty informative.

    How to Evaluate Oil Filters
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aiLhfAFhkvs

     
  6. grumpyvette

    grumpyvette Administrator Staff Member

    That video was interesting ,but the main thing I personally got from watching that was that I should have gone into much more detail as to what to look for in a filter, in this thread
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    ALL THAT OIL FILTER BYE-PASS VALVE DOES IS ROUTE OIL FLOW PAST THE OIL FILTER
    IF IT BECOMES SO CLOGGED WITH TRASH THAT THERES
    A 10 PSI DIFFERENCE IN THE RESISTANCE TO OIL FLOW THROUGH THE FILTER
    VS AROUND IT INTO THE BLOCKS OIL PASSAGES,
    oil enters the area over the oil filter in the block and is forced into the outer holes in the oil filter perimeter,
    down through the case and filter element and up through the central hollow screw retention stud,
    into the blocks oil passages, if the resistance too flow is too great,
    the oil filter bye-pass valve routes oil around the filter directly from oil pump to the blocks oil passages.

    [​IMG]




    [​IMG]
    http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...-friction-and-pumping-losses.8966/#post-31978

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    I had Bob stop over to use my lift to do and oil change , he brought his own oil, and filter etc. like he usually does and while he put his car up on my lift I got the oil catch can ready, and the oil filter wrench etc. and after he had the car up I rolled the oil catch can under the car and got the large funnel end centered, I dropped the disposable paper paint filter with one of my engine magnets into the base of the funnel like Ive done for decades so that all the oil draining out of the engine drains out thru the filter and and ferrous metal sticks to the magnet which I can use to trap and spot potential problems, Ive done that on my cars for decades and did it as a mater of course without really thinking about it on his car, after all the magnets easily reusable, after its cleaned, the filters thrown in the trash and I'm out 20 cents but I'm also likely to catch any issues with bearing failing early before they become a big issue.
    he said,
    "Ive seen you do that dozens of times and never thought to ask what the hell you were looking for,... well?"
    I looked at the screen and the magnet and said,
    "the doc prescribes more frequent oil changes , but other than that I think the patient will live"


    http://www.kjmagnetics.com/proddetail.asp?prod=D82SH

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    my shop oil collection drain can looks a bit like this one but holds 20 gallons
    http://www.homedepot.com/s/paint+filter?NCNI-5
    almost any auto paint store and most hardware stores sell these disposable throw away paint strainer filters , that cost about 20-35 cents each, or a bit less in bulk packs,
    honestly I don,t see why most guys don,t invest the dollar it takes for a magnet and a couple filters

    http://www.lowes.com/pd_126391-968-11114/12FF_1z0wd7b__?productId=1008383&pl=1


    if you only want to spend a dollar lowes sells four strainers for 98 cents , but buy a case they are cheaper that way
    250 for under $30

    http://www.gleempaint.com/cone-paint-strainers.html

    almost any auto paint store and most hardware stores sell these disposable throw away paint strainer filters , that cost about 20-35 cents each, or a bit less in bulk packs, honestly I don,t see why most guys don,t invest the few dollars or so it takes for a couple high temperature rated magnets and a couple filters to verify the crud thats circulating in your oil, decent filters
    yes I've told a great many people about the benefits of placing several high quality ceramic or similar high quality high heat tolerant magnets inside an engine,
    no mater how well any engine is built youll eventually find micro-metallic trash circulating with the oil flow and inevitably use of the magnets in the lifter gallery,
    heads and oil pan will result in you find a amazing amount of micro-metallic trash trapped on those magnets,
    keep in mind all that trash would gone through the oil pump gears, well BEFORE it had any chance of getting trapped in the oil filter.
    many magnets lose their magnetic pull if heated too 200F
    these SPECIAL CERAMIC MAGNETS below won,t

    they are available from several vendors
    proper magnets trap metallic debris
    SmCo Samarium Cobalt Disc Magnets
    http://www.magnet4less.com/
    [​IMG]
    https://www.magnet4sale.com/smco-magnets-dia-3-4x3-16-samarium-cobalt-magnets-608-f-temperature/
    http://www.magnet4less.com/product_...ucts_id=254&osCsid=ckl4nevgdrmireotnegg7jcf36

    http://www.magnet4sale.com/smco-magnets-dia-1x3-8-samarium-cobalt-magnets-608-f-temperature/

    Samarium Cobalt MAGNETS HELP
    http://www.magnet4sale.com/smco-disk-magnet-dia-1x1-4-samarium-cobalt-magnets-608-f-temperature/
    magnets are ceramic and glass hard, don,t try to drill or grind them, as they can shatter

    http://www.magnet4sale.com/smco-magnets-dia-1-2x1-4-samarium-cobalt-magnets-608f-temperature/
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    http://www.walmart.com/ip/Gerson-GER-10921-Paint-Strainer-125-Micron-Synthetic-Filter/47507885
    if you buy by a case, paint strainers for checking oil trash content come in 100, or 250 pack cartons, and can be had for under 15 cents each

    [​IMG]

    heres a helpful diagnostic tool,(the oil filter cutter pictured below) and yes I still cut open the oil filters and inspect the filter element on my cars oil filter

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    http://www.summitracing.com/parts/pro-66490/overview/
    [​IMG]

    and obviously having a decent quality longer length oil filter with a great deal of high quality surface area filter medium won,t hurt either


    obviously check which longer oil filter will fit your particular application
    Purolator number is 4631
    (Fram PH8A or Wix 51515
    [​IMG][/COLOR]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 22, 2018
  7. 87vette81big

    87vette81big Guest

    Its too bad most oil filter manufactures don't publish each individual oil flow rates New with 10w30 oil.
    Test with Hot oil at 220F.
    Test at 70F room temp.
    Test at -10 Below F.
    Do the differential pressure drop.
    Graph it all.
    Test at 10 psi increments up to 150 psi.
    Most oil filters will explode at 80 psi.
    The steel shell is so thin gauge of steel.
    I use K&N exclusive.
    Might take some flack but I like the extra thick steel shell.
    At least 2 to 3 times as thick as other major brand oil filters.
    The beefiest oil filters are used on Diesel Semi Trucks.
    They are huge yes but flow lots of oil at 60- 90psi.

    I don't worry so much about filtration effectiveness.
    More worried about rated gallons per minute flow rates.
     
  8. 87vette81big

    87vette81big Guest

    The old Fullsize Chevy GMC TRUCK FILTER 2 quart capacity has no drainback Valve, No bypass Valve.
    Spins right in place of the standard 1quart SBC & BBC filter.
    K&N number is HP-6002.
    I purchased 4 of them for my 410sbc.
    Lots of Filtration Area.

    My old friend Bill used The Chevy 2 quart Truck Filters too.
    ZERO ISSUES.
    FOLLOWING SUITE ALSO.
     
  9. 87vette81big

    87vette81big Guest

    The Video Link was informative Rick.
    Thanks.
     
  10. Indycars

    Indycars Administrator Staff Member

    Guys , I've asked two questions, but you have mostly commented on the video. What about the two valves I asked about? Is it because you are not sure either?

    Posted from iPad, in case ur wondering why I'm not blue. :roll:

    I have a couple of Sins, so I'm not sending any FLACK your way Brian !
     
  11. Indycars

    Indycars Administrator Staff Member

    I'm not sure how you meant that, should I have read more links???????? I know how you are about reading all the available info. I'm a big boy (& getting bigger by the minute :D ) so just tell it to me straight. Was the info in your links???

    Believe me I can handle it!
     
  12. 87vette81big

    87vette81big Guest

    Mostly not sure Rick.
    Can only say K & N filters have never failed me.
    I use crazy high oil pressures on Pontiac V8's.
    So they have plenty of bottom end oil at over 6k.
    Fram filters have exploded on me at 100 psi.
    Huge mess.

    On my Suburban, cold drive away oil pressure is 80psi at 3k rpms.
    Put a Scatt 9000 series crank in it , vandetvall bearings, melling M55A Z28 oil pump.
    K&N HP2001 filter. 4X4 model.

    If you have ground clearance I would use the Chevy 2-quart oil filter.
     
  13. grumpyvette

    grumpyvette Administrator Staff Member


    trust me when I say you added substantially to the threads content in a very useful way
    and no you didn,t fail to read anything that was previously posted that would have made much difference in my opinion, what I was concerned with is the fact that the video brought out a bunch of stuff that I should have gone thru in more detail. .. stuff I barely skimmed thru , because I assume (IN ERROR) at times most guys already know it, info that should have and did require a better explanation,..BTW THANKS THE ADDITIONAL INFO YOU POSTED in that video was a significant addition to the threads content!
    keep in mind in most answers to questions or threads posted here,I almost always try to keep the answers to questions rather generic so its not specifically linked, or limited to only one specific car or application.
     
  14. Indycars

    Indycars Administrator Staff Member


    Thanks Grumpy, just wanted to make sure!

    What do you think about my two questions from earlier?
     
  15. grumpyvette

    grumpyvette Administrator Staff Member

     
  16. Indycars

    Indycars Administrator Staff Member

    When the filter mounts in a vertical position, like on Chevys, then it's a moot
    point to have an anti-drainback valve ..... right??? If anything it
    provides another failure point or adds to the restriction of the filter to oil flow.

    I DOUBT IT REALLY MATTER,S IF YOU HAVE AN ANTI DRAIN BACK VALVE, EITHER WAY ON A VERTICAL FILTER LIKE MOST CHEVYS

    Did you mean to say anti-drainback, that's what the question was about???


    If a filter has a bypass valve, it has to work on differential pressure across the
    filter or is it something else??? And what are those numbers typically???

    MOST FILTERS START BYE-PASSING SOME OIL WHEN THE DIFFERENTIAL PRESSURE BETWEEN THE IN AND OUT SIDES EXCEEDS ABOUT 5_to-8 PSI, MOST ARE FULLY BYE-PASSING OIL FLOW AT 10 PSI

    Does this typically occur in normal situations like on a cold morning, before the engine warms up? What's a typical pressure drop of a new filter and one after 7500 miles?

     
  17. grumpyvette

    grumpyvette Administrator Staff Member

    yes sorry for brief the brain fart, typo,YES I meant drain back

    yes the BYE-PASS IN THE OIL FILTER DOES normally open on cold mornings, or under rapid changes in engine rpms, especially before the heat from the engine lowers the oils effective viscosity, Im fairly sure you have heard or remember hearing advise not to go doing stupid stuff like burn outs in your drive way until the engines reached and maintains operational temps
    (usually oil and coolant has reached 190F-215F) well one big reason is that thicker oil viscosity when oils cooler ,takes a good deal more pressure to force thru the filter medium, once the oils fairly hot it flows better, and requires less pressure as it offers less resistance to flow thru the engines clearances and thru the filter, that in turn means that hot oil with its thinner effective viscosity tends to be far less likely to force open the filter bye-pass circuit and that means oil bye-passing the filter medium is far less likely to drag metallic trash held in suspension with it to reach the bearings to cause more rapid wear.
    obviously buying an oil filter can opener tool, and doing some close personal inspection of what your dealing with won,t hurt.
    http://www.summitracing.com/parts/sum-900510/overview/
    http://www.homedepot.com/s/paint+filter?NCNI-5
    almost any auto paint store and most hardware stores sell these disposable throw away paint strainer filters , that cost about 20-35 cents each, or a bit less in bulk packs, honestly I don,t see why most guys don,t invest the dollar it takes for a magnet and a couple filters
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    heres a helpful diagnostic tool,(the oil filter cutter pictured below) and yes I still cut open the oil filters and inspect the filter element on my cars oil filter
    [​IMG]
    proper magnets trap metallic debris
    SmCo Samarium Cobalt Disc Magnets
    http://www.magnet4less.com/
    [​IMG]

    Samarium Cobalt MAGNETS HELP
    http://www.magnet4sale.com/smco-disk-magnet-dia-1x1-4-samarium-cobalt-magnets-608-f-temperature/
    magnets are ceramic and glass hard, don,t try to drill or grind them, as they can shatter
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


    if you don,t think a proper magnet can trap/hold and prevent metalic debriss from getting into the oil pump and bearings , look at this picture of an oil pan magnet I found posted
    [​IMG]
    Model# SMCO-D8
    Samarium Cobalt Magnets 3/4 in x 1/4 in Disc
    Suitable for high temperature applications

    Wholesale Price Range:
    $2.99
    [​IMG]
    BUYING A TOOL and DOING SOME PERSONAL LOOKING AT THE INTERNAL PARTS HELPS
    [​IMG]
    guys reading these threads might be amazed at what they see , once they start looking for facts with a tool that allows a close visual inspection of a filters internal components rather than makes un-informed random guesses.
    actually knowing what your dealing with is helpful,reading some links and doing research is also much more likely to produce informed answers than engaging in a (IS TOO! VS IS NOT! ) style discussion with someone else whos equally un-informed, like many of the threads posted on dozens of sites seem to be fated to be!
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 2, 2016
  18. Indycars

    Indycars Administrator Staff Member


    While searching for more info I learned that just because a manufacture has a line of Racing Filters like shown below, that doesn't mean they are going to filter better than their standard line of filters. What it does mean is they are going to flow more volume with the same or less pressure drop. Race cars are normally very well maintained and they need above all else a good flow of oil thru the engine. Chances are the race teams will change oil so frequently that their oil NEVER get anywhere near as dirty as the family car and the standard filter with the lower micron rating.

    The numbers I remember reading, the standard Wix filter is rated at 21 microns and their Racing Filter is rated at 32 microns. Therefore allowing the racing filter to flow better.

    NOTE: To find the info below you have to register for Wix Connect.





    Below is a nice view of the Drainback Valve.



    For the immediate future I've decided on the Wix 51061 non racing filter. It does not have either the drainback valve or bypass valve. Tell me if I'm wrong, but the filter adapter has a bypass in it, so no use in duplicating the same valve in the filter.

    http://www.summitracing.com/parts/wix-51061




    Comments and opinion are welcome!

     

    Attached Files:

  19. 87vette81big

    87vette81big Guest

    Your right Rick.
    That is a primary oil filter bypass valve.
    Some choose to use stock as is.
    The theory is in very cold weather operation or high volume oil demands it opens.
    Bypassing filter. Or if filter plugged.
    Some Choose to use an aftermarket oil filter adapter with no bypass valve
    On Pontiac V8 & Oldsmobile V8 engines I block off the factory bypass valve by Tapping for 3/8" NPT plug.
    3/4" aluminum to tap into.
    SBC & BBC Oil filter adapter has Around 1/16" aluminum to tap into .
    Really can't do on Chevrolet safe blocking bypass.
    Aftermarket like Moroso required.

    Confusing choices yes.
    I choose to block off.
    Up to you.
    Right or wrong at your own discretion.
     
  20. Indycars

    Indycars Administrator Staff Member


    Those two valves in the filter are most likely very reliable, but the
    simpler the better in my opinion.

     

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