busted valve spring

grumpyvette

Administrator
Staff member
bustedspringh4.jpg

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Hey grumpy, my cars engine started running like crap, and the valve springs on two valves started ticking ,
( I pulled this picture off the internet, its not my engine) but it looks very similar to my engines valve springs
so obviously, Ill need to be removing,and replacing the valve springs,

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removing,and replacing the valve springs,
testing and replacing valve springs can be done with the heads on the car, but its far easier to do correctly with the heads off the car.


youll eventually find a need to replace valve springs on any car that you either race or replace a cam in its engine so youll need the correct valve spring compressor tool
http://www.lislecorp.com/divisions/prod ... category=6
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if you don,t think the trouble and expense of installing a few shrapnel screens and a dozen magnets is worth the time and effort consider how much metallic crap will circulate through the oil pump if they are not in place when something unpleasant happens
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THIS TOOL WORKS OK ON SINGLE SPRINGS BUT NOT DUAL VALVE SPRINGS
http://www.summitracing.com/parts/otc-4573/media/images


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http://www.summitracing.com/parts/wmr-w ... dia/images
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THIS TOOL IS A BIT FLIMSY BUT WORK ON MOST HEADS WITH STOCK SPRINGS BUT ONLY WITH THE HEADS OFF THE ENGINE

http://www.summitracing.com/parts/sum-9 ... dia/images
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THIS TOOL WORKS ON SOME HEADS BETTER THAN OTHERS, WITH THE HEADS ON OR OFF THE ENGINE
http://www.summitracing.com/parts/pro-6 ... dia/images
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these links should help you understand the subject
THESE LINKS MAY ALSO PROVE TO BE USEFUL

http://www.buxtonengineering.com/on_head_valve_spring_tester.php

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=7716&p=29813#p29813

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=528&p=46440&hilit=shims#p46440

viewtopic.php?f=50&t=903&p=12435&hilit=valve+spring+compressor#p12435

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=2787&p=7220&hilit=valve+spring+compressor#p7220
valve spring compressors
the valve spring compressor design you use and the use of a large strong magnet can significantly reduce the tendency of those little S.O.B,s from poping off to parts unknown
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http://www.kjmagnetics.com/proddetail.asp?prod=DCA
$12 or so spent on a decent magnet placed next to the valve keepers during the removal process tends to significantly reduce the chances of lost valve keepers
valve spring compressors
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If your thinking you can swap to the 1.6:1 rockers without checking clearances carefully, ...probably not, your certainly going to need to check and verify clearances , and yeah, youll find a dozen guys that say they did it with zero problems......many could also tell you that in a few months they experienced a cam lobe /lifter or rocker failure as the push rod binding in even only part of the rockers arc, tends to cause excessive wear on the valve train, it might take some time but it will result in component failure over time if parts can,t move freely as designed.

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youll want too use a .060 clearance too the push rod to cylinder head slot clearance CHECKED CAREFULLY OVER THE FULL ARC OF THE ROCKER TRAVEL FOR A FULL TWO ENGINE ROTATIONS
if you need a LOUIS TOOL to lengthen the slots in the cylinder head I generally lay a section of plastic wrap in the lifter gallery and be sure to place two magnets on the blocks lifter gallery wall, to hold the thin plastic wrap in place firmly, below the cylinder head while drilling to catch the metalic debris the drill will generally produce, between the plastic sheat and the magnets youll generally catch 100% of the trash the drill generates

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btw place a magnet like this under each pushrod slot to catch the drill chips from iron heads
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These Proform pushrod slotting tools are designed to elongate the pushrod slot in the cylinder head. They will make room for higher ratio rocker arms. Use these tools with a drill and a 5/16 in. drill bit to elongate the pushrod slot.
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http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...o-rockers-and-the-pushrods-rub.198/#post-3033
http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...swap-in-1-6-1-ratio-rockers.10671/#post-46039
http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...e-train-clearances-and-problems.528/#post-664
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http://www.jegs.com/i/Moroso/710/62371/10002/-1
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you need EITHER PUSH ROD GUIDE PLATES
BELOW NOTICE SCREW IN ROCKER STUDS

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OR SELF ALIGNING ROCKERS (BELOW)

USED WITH PRESS IN ROCKER STUDS
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used with press in rocker studs

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yes they DO MAKE ROLLER ROCKERS IN BOTH STANDARD AND SELF ALIGNING VERSIONS

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pictured above you see the last rocked badly out of alignment with the valve center line,
a good example why you need adjustable guide plates, this rocker if left too run off center like this, on the valve stem tip , will quickly destroy the valve guide and rocker
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if your heads have push rod guide plates you are not supposed to use self aligning rockers as yes they will frequently bind the push rods up and keep them from spinning, if you have guide plates you want the NON-self aligning rockers
as I've pointed out dozens of times a day spent reading links will save you a week of work and a wheelbarrow full of wasted cash.

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...s-in-vs-threaded-rocker-studs.2746/#post-7475

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/valve-train-clearances-and-problems.528/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...-in-vs-threaded-rocker-studs.2746/#post-43539

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/push-rods-rub.13031/#post-67779

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...-rockers-and-the-pushrods-rub.198/#post-56571

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...e-springs-and-setting-up-the-valve-train.181/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...-pushrods-and-check-info-you-might-need.5931/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/stock-gm-push-rod-length.3844/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...ve-spring-iinstalled-height.12790/#post-66037

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/more-bent-push-rods.12401/#post-61890

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/rocker-push-rod-wear-issues.9815/#post-54088

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/z28-valve-spring-upgrade.10409/#post-43176


http://www.corvettefever.com/tipstricks ... ewall.html

viewtopic.php?f=50&t=903&p=10020&hilit=change+valve+springs#p10020

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...pressors-and-checking-springs.903/#post-10020

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=4957&p=13739&hilit=spring+bind#p13739

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=181&p=19783&hilit=change+valve+springs#p19783

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=6237&p=19552&hilit=change+valve+springs#p19552

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=4962&p=13780&hilit=change+valve+springs#p13780
 
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grumpyvette

Administrator
Staff member

Well JACK,s been complaining that his big block 454 engines just not reving to the same peak rpm levels that it used to, so I suggested he come by for a tune-up, during the process I naturally adjusted the valves and during that procedure I leaned on a few valve springs as a un scientific test to see if any felt a bit worn out.
well I found a few that didn,t feel correct so I suggested we test a few and it was obvious that the seat loads varied quite a bit, Keep in mind valve springs are an alloy steel thats been heat treated and the constant flexing tends to rapidly heat the valve springs, that heats counter productive and it will reduce the spring tension. testing has consistently proven at least 40% of the heat a engine produces is related to friction in the valve train.
its fairly common for valve springs to loose 10%-25% of the installed tension loads keeping the valves seated,over time.
this is frequently the reason an engine seems to gradually loose the ability to rev as high as it originally did as a freshly built engine over time, a set of valve springs that were installed height ,at lets say 1.900 inches and 120-140 lbs for a flat tappet cam application, might only test at 90-100 lbs after a year or two of being raced or driven on the street!
This loss of valve spring pressure reduces the engines ability to maintain lifter to cam lobe contact and valve train control.

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its not horsepower, its the stress on the valve train, that makes a rocker stud girdle and its increased rigidity useful,
and thats more closely related to average stress levels, RPM and VALVE SPRING LOAD RATES
any time your occasionally exceeding 6000rpm or getting close too 330 lbs of open valve load rate Id strongly suggest screw in rocker studs
any time your intentionally exceeding 6000rpm and exceeding 350 lbs of open valve spring rate a rocker stud girdle might be a good idea.
and if your regularly exceeding 6500rpm and 400 lbs of open valve spring load rate its use is going to become almost mandatory
http://www.summitracing.com/parts/pro-66950

http://www.summitracing.com/parts/sum-141010

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additional oil spray directed at the valve springs, thats used to absorb and cool the valve springs will usually add durability and life expectancy to the valve springs


COMP Cams POSTED THESE TIPS
The Truth About Valve Springs
Valve springs are one of the most critical and most overlooked components in your engine. Proper selection of the valve spring begins with identifying the application and selecting all of the valve train components to achieve the engine builders’ goals.

The spring is selected to complement the system and must be matched with the entire valve train in order for the engine to reach its full potential. It does absolutely no good to install a cam that will rpm to 8000 if you do not have the correct springs. Improper selection of the wrong valve spring is one of the most common causes of engine failure. Other common causes are the incorrect installation and improper handling of the valve springs.

Selecting a Spring

1. Use only the valve springs that will give the correct spring pressure with the valve both on the seat and at maximum lift.

2. The outside diameter of the recommended valve spring may require that the spring pocket of the head be machined to a bigger size.

3. One of the easiest and sometimes most costly mistakes made in racing engines is not positively locating the spring. A valve spring that “dances” around on the cylinder head or retainer causes harmful harmonics and excessive wear. A spring that is forced onto a retainer is likely to fail at that coil. That is why we have such a large selection of steel and titanium retainers, hardened steel spring seat cups and I.D. locators to better match our springs. A spring that is contained properly at the retainer and the cylinder head will offer the longest possible service life.

Proper Spring Handling

1. Handle springs with care. Never place in a vise, grab with pliers or hit them with a hammer. This will damage the surface of the spring, which will cause a spring to fail.

2. When separating double or triple springs, use only a durable plastic object that cannot harm the shot-peened surface of the spring. Never use a tool or hard metal object like a screwdriver.


3. Valve springs are shipped with a rust preventative coating that should remain on the spring throughout engine assembly. Do not clean springs with acidic or evaporative cleaners. This causes rapid drying and promotes the formation of rust on the surface, which can cause catastrophic failures. Even a slight amount of corrosion can grow to be a problem.

4. When installing springs, use COMP Cams® Valve Train Assembly Spray (Part #106) to ease assembly and improve the life of the spring.

Checking Loads

1. COMP Cams® has matched each set of springs for load consistency. A variance of + or -10% is acceptable for new springs.

2. When checking the spring loads on a load tester (Part #5313) measure and note the thickness of the retainer where the outer spring sits. Assemble the retainer on the spring and place on the base of the spring checker.

3. Compress the spring to the desired installed height. This is the measurement between the top of the spring (on the bottom side of the retainer where the outer spring sits) and the bottom of the spring on the base.

* NOTE *
Since the retainer is installed in the spring when checking the spring loads, make certain that the thickness of the retainer is not included when calculating the installed height and is accounted for when compressing the spring. The spring load checker will show to be higher with the spring installed at the correct height.


Installation

1. Before installing the spring on the cylinder heads, check the installed spring height (Diagram A). This is the distance from the bottom of the retainer to the surface where the spring rests on the head. The valves, retainers and valve locks will be used in this step. First, install the valve in the guide, then install the retainer and valve locks. Pull the retainer tightly against the valve locks while holding the valve assembly steady.
Measure the distance between the spring seat and the outside step of the retainer using your height micrometer (Part #4928 or #4929) or a snap gauge and a pair of calipers. Repeat this procedure for all the valves and record your Information. After you have measured all the valves, find the shortest height. This will become the spring’s installed height on your heads. If your combination includes a dual or triple spring assembly, it will be necessary to allow for the inner steps of the retainer.

2. Once you have determined the shortest installed height, it will be necessary to use shims to obtain this height (±.020” is acceptable) on the remaining valves. These are available through our catalog or at any of
your local COMP Cams® dealers.

3. Before removing the retainers, measure the distance from the bottom of the retainer to the top of the valve seal (Diagram A). This distance must be greater than the lift of the valve. If not, the guide must be machined. This is a very common cause of early camshaft failure.

4. Once the valve springs have been installed, it is important to check for coil bind. This means that when the valve is fully open, there must be a minimum of .060” clearance between the coils of both the inner and outer springs. If this clearance does not exist, you must change either the retainer or the valve to gain more installed height, or change to a spring that will handle more lift or machine the spring seat for extra depth.

5. Always check for clearance between the retainer and the inside face of the rocker arm. This will be most evident while the valve is on the seat. Rocker arms are designed to clear specific spring diameters, so you should check to see that you have the proper rocker arm/retainer combination. This situation can also be the result of improper rocker geometry and may be corrected with different length pushrods or a different length valve.

6. To aid in the engine breaking process, spray the springs, rocker arms and pushrods with COMP Cams® Valve Train Assembly Spray (Part #106).


Breaking In a Spring

1. It is important for new springs to take a heat-set. Never abuse or run the engine at high rpm when the springs are new. Upon initial start-up, limit rpm to 1500 to 2000 until the temperature has reached operating levels. Shut off the engine and allow the springs to cool to room temperature. This usually will eliminate early breakage and prolong spring life. After the spring has been “broken-in”, it is common for it to lose a slight amount of pressure. Once this initial pressure loss occurs, the spring pressure should remain constant unless the engine is abused and the spring becomes overstressed. Then the springs must either be replaced or shimmed to the correct pressure.

inding the Right Installed Height & Proper Spring Load

In the world of performance engine tuning, valve springs are one of the most critical and overlooked components in your engine. They are selected to complement the system and must be matched with the entire valve train in order for the engine to reach its full potential. The valve spring is basically all that holds the valve train together.

Thanks to the vast array of unique cylinder head options, the days of ordering a valve train "kit” (one deal fits all) are gone. You need to know the dimensions (size) of the spring pockets in your head and how much height you have to work with, in order for the manufacturer to get the valve springs that will work for your application.

Installing a cam that will rpm to 8000 does absolutely no good if you don’t have the correct valve springs. If the valve springs are not designed for the same rpm, the spring load (the force applied by the spring, measured in lbs.) will limit the amount of power the engine makes, or worse, cause severe damage to the engine. Not enough spring load can cause major problems, including premature loss of valve train control (valve float). Too much spring load, however, can wear out flat-tappet cams and prematurely collapse hydraulic lifters (make lifter noise).

1000 lb. Rimac Valve Spring Tester

Use only valve springs that will give the correct spring load with the valve on the seat (seat load) and at maximum lift (open load). The outside diameter of the recommended spring may require that the spring pocket of the head be machined to a bigger size. A spring that is properly contained at the retainer and the cylinder head will offer the longest possible service life.

When installing springs, use COMP Cams® Valve Train Assembly Spray (Part #106) to ease assembly and improve the life of the spring.

COMP Cams® has matched each set of springs for load consistency. A variance of + or - 10% is acceptable for new springs. When checking the spring load on a load tester (Part #5313), measure the thickness of the retainer where the outer spring sits.

Assemble the retainer on the spring and place on the base of the spring tester. Compress the spring to the desired installed height. This is the measurement between the top of the spring (on the bottom side of the retainer) and the surface where the spring rests on the head.

IMPORTANT: Since the retainer is installed in the spring when checking the spring loads, make certain that the thickness of the retainer is not included when calculating the installed height and is accounted for when compressing the spring. The spring load checker will show to be higher with the spring installed at the correct height.



Too much installed height for a spring will give too soft of spring load, causing valve float and lead to broken parts. Too little height for a spring, will give too much spring load, and may even coil bind the springs, which will break rockers, bend pushrods, etc.

Before installing the spring on the cylinder heads, check the installed spring height (Diagram A).


Finding the Right Height for Optimal Spring Load:

Valve Spring Height Micrometer

1. Install 1 intake and 1 exhaust valve.

2. Get the correct retainer for the spring and correct locks for the retainer. Pull the retainer tightly against the valve locks while holding the valve assembly steady.

3. Place height micrometer (Part #4928 or #4929) or a snap gauge and a pair of calipers on the valve between the spring seat and the outside step of the retainer and turn the height micrometer counterclockwise to establish valve spring height. After you have measured all the valves, find the shortest height. This will become the spring’s installed height on your heads.

4. Add shims until proper height is obtained on the remaining valves.

5. Take the height micrometer and retainer to valve spring tester and check valve spring load at that height.



Before removing the retainers, measure the distance between the bottom of the retainer and the top of the valve seal (Diagram A). This distance must be greater (approx. .045” more) than the lift of the valve. If not, the guide must be machined. This is a very common cause of early camshaft failure.

EXAMPLE:

COMP Cams® # 986-16
Seat Load 132 lbs @ 1.750"
Open Pressure 293 lbs @ 1.250"
Spring rate 322 lbs per inch
Coil bind 1.150

Seat load is with valve seated against the seat @1.75" tall. Open load is with the valve open to 1.250". Spring rate means that for every inch the spring travels, the rate increases 322 lbs. Coil bind means the spring will only compress to 1.150", this means the spring is solid.

Another example, we are going to install this spring on a head. We check our intake spring height, it is 1.810" tall. We would need a shim .060" thick to install @ 1.750".

Next we will check the exhaust. It checks 1.840"; we would need to add a .030” and .060” shim to install correctly.

Once the valve springs have been installed, it is important to check for coil bind. This means that when the valve is fully open, there must be a minimum of .060” clearance between the coils of both the inner and outer springs. If this clearance does not exist, you must change either the retainer or the valve to gain more installed height, or change to a spring that will handle more lift or machine the spring seat for extra depth.

Always check for clearance between the retainer and the inside face of the rocker arm. This will be most evident while the valve is on the seat. Rocker arms are designed to clear specific spring diameters, so you should check to see that you have the proper rocker arm/retainer combination. This situation can also be the result of improper rocker geometry and may be corrected with different length pushrods or a different length valve.

To aid in the engine break-in process, spray the springs, rocker arms and pushrods with COMP Cams® Valve Train Assembly Spray (Part #106).

RELATED THREADS
http://www.enginebuildermag.com/Article ... rings.aspx

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=6491&p=20681&hilit=spray+springs+cooling#p20681

http://www.woodcarbs.com/valvesprings.htm

http://www.lunatipower.com/Tech/Valvetr ... gTech.aspx

http://www.chevyhiperformance.com/tech/ ... ead_build/

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=8460&p=29682&hilit=test+valve+spring#p29682

http://www.shotpeener.com/library/pdf/1979030.pdf

http://www.techlinecoatings.com/article ... rticle.htm

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=4962&p=13771&hilit=test+valve+spring#p13771

viewtopic.php?f=44&t=6147&p=19083&hilit=test+valve+spring#p19083

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=181

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=399

forum.grumpysperformance.com/viewtopic.php?f=52&t=4283&p=15748&hilit=test+valve+spring#p15748
 
Last edited by a moderator:

grumpyvette

Administrator
Staff member
IT just occurred to me some of you gentlemen might not have a list of part numbers or know where to order valve springs, now I build mostly big block engines so here is a related bit of info, all the major cam manufacturers can supply valve spring kits
The following recommendations are from Erson Cams. If you have questions, you can reach their tech department at 800-641-7920.

Hydraulic Flat Tappet Camshaft: 110 lbs Seat pressure/250-280 lbs open pressure

Solid Flat Tappet Camshaft: 130 lbs Seat Pressure/300-325 lbs open pressure

Hydraulic Roller Camshaft: 130 lbs Seat Pressure/300- 325 lbs open pressure

Solid Roller Camshaft: (Minimum Safe Pressures DEPEND ON SEVERAL FACTORS)

Up to .600˝ valve lift: 200-235 lbs Seat Pressure/600 lbs open pressure

Over .600˝ valve lift: 250-280 lbs Seat pressure /100 lbs pressure for every .100˝ of valve lift
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#1 installed height #2 spring diam.#3 verify clearances between spring and matching parts
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having , AND USING a valve spring micrometer of the correct size and knowing how to use it helps a great deal
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12495496 - Valve Spring Kit

This high performance chrome vanadium spring and damper assembly was developed for heavy-duty L88, and ZL1, and LS7 engines. The outer coil diameter is 1.487". The spring yields 116 pounds seat pressure at an installed height of 1.88". Open pressure is 310 pounds at .560 valve lift. This spring coil binds at 1.20". It is rated at 317 pounds/inch. This kit includes 16 springs of P/N 3916164, and use P/N 3916164 for single spring replacement. Use steel retainer P/N 3879613.

12366567 Valve Spring Kit
These heavy-duty spring assemblies are made of aircraft quality steel and recommended for big block competition engines. The outer coil diameter is 1.525". The spring yields 128 pounds seat pressure at an installed height of 1.70", and this spring coil binds at 1.26". It's rated at 406 pounds/inch. This kit includes 16 springs of P/N 366282, and use P/N 366282 for single spring replacement. Use steel retainer P/N 366254. This spring requires a small diameter aftermarket PC-type valve stem seal.

12371061 Valve Spring Kit
These high performance springs assembly are used in all 396, 427, and 545 LS6 crate engines. The outer coil diameter is 1.487". The spring yields 105 pounds seat pressure at an installed height of 1.88", and if this spring coil binds at 1.28" it's rated at 450 pounds/inch. This kit includes 16 springs of P/N 3970627, and use P/N 3970627 for single spring replacement. Use steel retainer P/N 3964264.

Modifier
12371062 Valve Spring Kit
These heavy-duty spring assemblies are made of aircraft quality steel and recommended for big block competition engines. The outer coil diameter is 1.538". The spring yields 128 pounds seat pressure at an installed height of 1.90", and this spring coil binds at 1.26". It's rated at 330 pounds/inch. This kit includes 16 springs of P/N 3989354, and use P/N 3989354 for single spring replacement. Use steel retainer P/N 3989353. This spring requires a small diameter aftermarket PC-type valve stem seal.

12462970 Valve Spring
Technical Notes: This high performance valve spring has an outer and inner spring. Used in late model 502 HO engines.

12495496 Valve Spring Kit
This high performance chrome vanadium spring and damper assemby was developed for heavy-duty L88, and ZL1, and LS7 engines. The outer coil diameter is 1.487". The spring yields 116 pounds seat pressure at an installed height of 1.88". Open pressure is 310 pounds at .560 valve lift. This spring coil binds at 1.20". It is rated at 317 pounds/inch. This kit includes 16 springs of P/N 3916164, and use P/N 3916164 for single spring replacement. Use steel retainer P/N 3879613.

12495514 Valve Spring Kit
These high performance spring assemblies are used in all 454 and 502 crate engines. The outer coil diameter is 1.487". The spring yields 110 pounds seat pressure at an installed height of 1.88". This kit includes 16 springs of P/N 14097002, and use P/N 14097002 for single spring replacement. Use steel retainer P/N 14096274.

14097002 Valve Spring
This high performance valve spring has an outer and inner spring. Used in late model 454 and 502 HO engines. Small Image
Technical Notes: The dual spring is 1.487" O.D. diameter 1. The pressure at installed height is 110# @ 1.88". Use with valve spring retainer P/N 14096274.

12495688 Valve Spring Cap Kit
This special machined steel performance valve spring cap kit is used on the 502/502ci engine kit. These spring caps are used with valve spring P/N 12462970 or spring kit P/N 12495691. This kit includes 16 of P/N 12366990. Use P/N 12366990 for single service replacement. Small Image


12495689 Valve Spring Stem Key Kit
This special machined steel performance valve spring stem key kit is used on the 502/502ci engine kit. These spring cap keys are used with valve spring cap P/N 12366990 or spring cap kit P/N 12495688. This kit includes 32 keys.

12495691 Valve Spring Kit
This special performance valve spring kit is used on the 502/502ci engine kit. These springs can be used on any big block Chevrolet engine that requires this valve spring specification. This outer coil spring diameter is 1.514". The spring yields 140 pounds at installed height of 1.940", and this spring coil binds at 1.20". It's rated at 368 pounds/inch. This kit includes 16 of P/N 12462970. Use P/N 12462970 for single service replacement.

3916464 Valve Spring
This high performance valve spring has an outer and inner spring with a damper; was originally used in the 427/454 LS7, ZL1, and L-88 Corvettes. Good for mild performance big blocks Small Image
Technical Notes: The dual spring is 1.487" O.D. diameter and 1.10" solid height. The pressure at installed height is 116# @ 1.88" with 317# the average rate of pound per inch. Use with valve spring retainer P/N 3879613.

3970627 Valve Spring
This high performance valve spring has an outer and inner spring; was originally used in the 454 LS6 Chevelle's in the 1970's. Good for mild performance big blocks. Small Image
Technical Notes: The dual spring is 1.487" O.D. Diameter and 1.28" solid height. The pressure at installed height is 105# @ 1.88" with 450# the average rate of pound per inch. Use with valve spring retainer P/N 3964264.

3989354 Valve Spring
This high performance valve spring has an outer and inner spring with a damper. Used with mild race camshaft. Small Image
Technical Notes: The dual spring is 1.538" O.D. diameter and 1.26" solid height. The pressure at installed height is 128# @ 1.90" with 330# the average rate of pound per inch. Use with valve spring retainer P/N 3989353.
while I generally use stainless 6 or 8 mesh screens theres lots of options that will work just fine, just remember to keep the oil changed regularly or theres some potential for sludge to clog ANY size shrapnel screens
http://www.twpinc.com/twpinc/products/T ... 6T0350W36T
http://www.twpinc.com/twpinc/products/T ... 8S0280W36T
mor-25026.jpg

http://www.summitracing.com/parts/mor-25026?seid=srese1&gclid=COOf2IODscgCFZKAaQodHWoF1Q
it should not take a great deal of imagination to see that a broken rocker, lifter or push-rod could dump metalic debris into an oil drain back port that wold rapidly result in increased internal engine damage as a result.
img_1047_2.jpg

Something like this, placing magnets and shrapnel screens helps engine durability red ones in drain valley, green ones being overkill/optional?


yeah thats logical magnet locations,
HeadMagnets.jpg

liftervalleyscreen.jpg

InsideMediumA.jpg

Sample%20Head%20Magnets.jpg


IVE typically used these magnets in an engine, one in the rear oil drain on each cylinder head, one near each lifter gallery drain and 4 in the oil pan sump
proper magnets trap metallic debris
SmCo Samarium Cobalt Disc Magnets
http://www.magnet4less.com/

IVE typically used these magnets in an engine, one in the rear oil drain on each cylinder head, one near each lifter gallery drain and 4 in the oil pan sump
proper magnets trap metallic debris
SmCo Samarium Cobalt Disc Magnets
http://www.magnet4less.com/
many magnets lose their magnetic pull if heated to 200F
these below won,t

proper magnets trap metallic debris

SmCo Samarium Cobalt Disc Magnets
http://www.magnet4less.com/
enginemagn.jpg


http://www.magnet4less.com/product_...ucts_id=254&osCsid=ckl4nevgdrmireotnegg7jcf36

http://www.magnet4sale.com/smco-magnets-dia-1x3-8-samarium-cobalt-magnets-608-f-temperature/

Samarium Cobalt MAGNETS HELP
http://www.magnet4sale.com/smco-disk-magnet-dia-1x1-4-samarium-cobalt-magnets-608-f-temperature/
magnets are ceramic and glass hard, don,t try to drill or grind them, as they can shatter

THIS is a good example of what happens to bearings if the oil passages are allowed to push small metallic debris, from wear like rockers,valve tips,cam and lifter wear thru the engine, use of a few small magnets, and shrapnel screens helps reduce or eliminate this

bearingd1.jpg

bearingd2.jpg


RELATED INFO


http://www.racingsprings.com/
I USUALLY BUY VALVE SPRINGS FROM THESE GUYS

http://www.usaperform.com/bvalve-spring ... 5_328.html

viewtopic.php?f=50&t=8745&p=30913#p30913

http://www.pbm-erson.com/store.php?catId=169

small block


big block

porting


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FfRogAyDOHI

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4iSXstAYCdU

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-IljMBoV ... cqomISHZOE

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=95uNTVvs5Ag

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZtG0X-pyAyk

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kg4-vEP9laE
 
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grumpyvette

Administrator
Staff member
I at times just wonder where guys heads are at?
I see guys look at cylinder heads advertized from various sources as having valve springs set up for a roller cam or flat tappet cam, that list a set valve spring clearance, like .600,...EXAMPLE
http://www.summitracing.com/parts/drt-1 ... /overview/
http://www.dartheads.com/products/aitdo ... le_id/114/
now theres a great deal of info posted about various cylinder heads listed for sale, but I can assure you not all of that info is accurate once you start measuring, regardless of manufacturer

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...ck-chevy-gen-v-vi-to-adjustable-rockers.4564/

guys who then go out and buy a cam with a .575 lift , to work with those cylinder heads, and without checking the actual valve train clearances they slap the new cam in the engine ,use a dot-to-dot index instal, never check the spring load rates or clearances or take the effort to degree in the cam or check the valve to piston clearances, etc. they adjust the valves and assume they have the correct clearances and valve train geometry....
If you think like that II have got to ask....
have you realized that a head with a valve spring installed height that in theory allows a .600 lift and a cam that has a .575 lift may not leave the .060 minimum coil bind clearance, or the retainer to valve seal clearance,thats required and clearances MUST be checked after assembly.
once you get close too or reach spring bind or any valve train clearance binding you WILL EXPERIENCE PARTS FAILURE, its just a mater of time
the truth is that a valve spring factory rated to clear a .600 lift may or may not after being installed provide that clearance and you can not assume it will. this whole thread reminds me of a friend I have (LARRY) that purchased heads with valve springs rated for a .650 lift, he found the valves floated at only 5700rpm, so he had a machine shop verify the spring load rates and clearances,what they found was that the load rates were off, resulted in him needing to install valve shims too have the correct valve spring load rates, yet, only after the cam lobes in larrys engine started to wear excessively in under a weeks time, did he bother too verify clearances. only to find the rockers were binding on the rocker studs and the cams .620 lift actually exceeded his then current .615 clearance, and even that was compromised as the rocker slot to rocker nut clearance restricted the rocker movement , binding the rocker slightly before that point in the valve lift.
the fact is that only after the components are assembled can you accurately verify clearances and you can not assume listed clearances are correct!

related info

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=181

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=1376

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=9613

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=6198

A VALVE SPRING LOAD TESTER IS EXPENSIVE, BUT A GREAT TOOL TO HAVE
vsts1.jpg

http://streetperformanceusa.com/i-72754 ... ester.html
vsts2a.jpg

http://www.summitracing.com/parts/pro-66775
vsts3.jpg

http://www.summitracing.com/parts/pro-66776/overview/

$220 for this
http://www.summitracing.com/parts/pro-67597/overview/
pro-67597_cp.jpg


$268 for this
http://www.summitracing.com/parts/pro-66774/overview/
pro-66774_5_w.jpg


$515 for this
http://www.summitracing.com/parts/pro-66776/overview/
PRO-66776_xl.jpg

If your going to run vortec heads, you either check you have clearance on current heads, with accurate precision tools and/or if you find you don,t have the required clearance,your going to be forced to modify current heads or you could buy heads with the correct clearance

replacing worn valve guides
https://goodson.com/collections/cylinder-head-rebuilding-tools
http://www.cylinderheadsupply.com/kl8540.html
valveguidemes.jpg

http://www.enginebuildermag.com/2003/12 ... ditioning/

http://www.calgaryfieros.com/OSGdocs/va ... seals.html


http://www.hthoward.co.uk/engine-machin ... -sleeving/

http://www.hotrodlane.cc/New%20LS%20Lin ... inding.htm
K-Line-bronzeliner-diagram-valve-guide-liners.jpg

K-line-Interrupted-Spiral-Valve-Guide-Liners.jpg

Take the effort to read through ALL the related threads, with info you might need, as it will without any doubt be time very well spent and save you hours of wasted effort and a couple wheel-barrows full of cash over time!


http://www.cylinderheadsupply.com/valve-guide-tools-guide-top-cutters.html
sun-cp7827_w.jpg

If the valve springs are to be removed with the heads still on the car,

the last thing you want is too remove a valve spring and have the valve to drop into the cylinder,
if you use air the crank tends to want to spin the crank to BDC, youll want to verify TDC ,
and make sure the flywheels temporarily prevented from turning from that the TDC position,
Ive used both methods both work,you can put 6 ft of rope in the cylinder while its in BDC then turn it to TDC, Ive used both with zero issues,
If you use the compressor youll want to keep it at 120 psi and constantly feeding pressurized air to keep the valves held in place,
and theres a small chance the compressor pushes enough moisture to allow water to accumulate in the cylinders,
so be sure you spin the engine with the starter with the spark plugs removed several times before you re-install plugs.
if you use the rope, theres a very low chance that the rope will tangle and form a knot that makes removal difficult,
in either case be sure the pistons locked at tdc,
before removing the valve springs, on each cylinder.


reading the related info will be helpful
http://www.summitracing.com/parts/sum-151124

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...train-clearances-and-problems.528/#post-57678

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...ting-up-the-valve-train.181/page-2#post-54091

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/what-springs.11352/#post-51960

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...-loads-and-installed-height.10709/#post-46627

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/removing-valve-seals.4283/#post-44287


http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/the-new-215cc-vortec-heads.266/#post-35948

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...-vortec-heads-and-other-heads.401/#post-34996

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/vortec-info.529/#post-27299

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...o-the-large-port-vortec-heads.1040/#post-1943

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/vortec-related-info.731/#post-1028

 
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