guide too re-installing the intake manifold /distributor

grumpyvette

Administrator
Staff member
read these thread LINKS and watch this video link below first,

because theres a ton of related info that can help, you ,
to prevent oil & coolant or vacuum leaks, and gasket damage,

BE AWARE that if the intake manifold bolts used are too short the threads may strip,
\if they are too long you might bend or lock a push rod or.
crack a head casting if overly tightened in the wrong location

arp-434-2101.jpg

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http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/how-to-pick-timing-gear-set.4548/#post-43700


http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...ei-distributors-ignition-advance-curve.16425/

\\
these gaskets work ok,

http://www.mr-gasket.com/ProductsListBy ... election=6

http://www.summitracing.com/parts/FPP-1205/

inman1.jpg


fpp-1205_w.jpg


the basic process starts with selecting quality intake gaskets that fit your cylinder heads and intake port size.
most Chevy intake gaskets seal best if you pitch/throw the end gasket cork or rubber end rail sections in a dumpster and take the time to carefully de-
grease, then dimple the upper surface on the blocks front and rear, and matching intake manifold and matching front and rear intake under surface's and use use your finger to smear a thin coat of sealant on both upper and lower surfaces,to insure a good mechanical bond then run or add about a 1/4" bead of silicone gasket cement on both surfaces before you install the intake as the silicone will fill and seal the gap more consistently and the dimple surface gives it a firm grip if properly applied, you can also use a thin bead around the coolant transfer ports and if you really want a good seal, a spray coating of copper coat spray like you might use on head gaskets won,t hurt either, but its generally not a good idea to use much silicone around intake ports as it tends to squeeze out and firm up , leaving a restrictive lip sticking into the intake runner ports if any excess is used.


http://www.nationaltbucketalliance.com/ ... torque.asp
sbcintaketorque.jpg

327_engine+sealer.jpg

read this thread and sub linked info
viewtopic.php?f=50&t=609
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if your worried about intake leaks heres a tip, when your worried about to the front and rear intake manifold seals I don,t think it matters, if the gasket set came with or without block rail seals, that much as they generally get pitched in a local dumpster
watch the video

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YdIGZ-tV ... re=related


trimming off any excess head gasket tip that protrudes into the seal area with a sharp chisel, and dimpling both the block forward and rear rails and the matching intake surfaces before applying a 1/4" thick bead of sealant to both surfaces help maintain a good oil seal on the intake to block end gaskets on the intake
dimplea.jpg

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IntakeRR050.jpg

FrontIntakeSeal_2544a.jpg

bbcintakez.jpg


step 1
pull and carefully clean and degrease the intake mount surfaces...BUT ONLY after you bring the engine to TDC on the damper tab and balancer marks and verifying the distributor rotor is pointing at cylinder #1, so you know where its suppose to point during the re-installation then
throw the intake manifold kits rubber front and rear intake seal bars in the new intake set in the dumpster


disposableglove.jpg

http://www.napaglove.com/products/index ... duct_ID=79
DISPOSABLE GLOVES HELP
acetonec.jpg

alcohol.jpg

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step 2
clean the block rails and the matching lower intake surfaces with acetone, or a toluene soaked, shop rag. clean all previous gasket material and sealant off the heads and block surfaces with a gasket scrapper or razor, and acetone soaked rag, (optional but recommended) then use a steel center punch to dimple the block upper surface china walls(front and rear upper surface lightly , and the matching lower intake rail area, to provide a firm grip and adhesion for the high temp silicone gasket cement, youll spread in a 1/4" thick bead on both surfaces, be sure the corners get just a bit extra silicone during the application of the silicone gasket cement

step 3
place a 1/4" wide bead of black silicone sealant along the length of the center of BOTH the front and rear block rails and both the matched lower intake mating surfaces, just AFTER first spreading a bonding coat on both dimpled surfaces with your finger,and allowing it to bond and dry for 2 minutes so the silicone beads that will shortly be added, and melded/compressed above and compressed between the matched dimpled mating surfaces,you just covered with a thin layer of smeared gasket cement and that bead of sealant on those twin mating surfaces of the block rail and intake will bond firmly place the intake port gaskets and align the bolt holes with the holes in the cylinder heads and put a small very thin bead of silicone sealant around 360 degrees of the water transfer ports,on both sides of the gasket, on both gaskets then place the intake straight down into place so the wet sealant beads mesh, blend and squeeze out a bit.

step 4
drop the intake into place with minimal forward or backward or side to side movement, use a long Phillips screw driver in a bolt hole will help to easily align the intake, tighten slowly in stages working from the center bolts outward, use a #2 Phillips screw driver to make minor adjustments to the intake thru the bolt holes if it moved a bit during the install, then drop the bolts into place and thread all bolts finger tight before tightening any of them,.then torque them down in stages, working in a circular pattern out to the ends.

http://www.nationaltbucketalliance.com/ ... torque.asp
http://www.summersbrothersracing.co...LF-CUT-DRIVE-FLANGE-BIG-BLOCK-CHEVY_p_30.html
step 5

allow to dry for a couple hours minimum over night,will be better, before use

Id consider extending the threads in a hole drilled for the intake mount bolts in aluminum heads to about almost the full depth 1.2" depth the factory drilled the holes in aluminum heads to at least 1" depth after your finished fixing the threads,if you have any stripped thread issues and ID BE using studs with an allen key top to thread into the heads like bolts after the intakes installed so they have full thread engagement before you use a washer and nut to clamp the intake, because doing it that way will almost totally eliminate any possibility of the thread problems in the future, yes it takes a bit longer but it also prevents stripped threads

http://www.boltdepot.com/Product-Detail ... oduct=8567

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OPTIONAL but RECOMMENDED

the use a sharp object like a steel punch or awl and plastic hammer to DIMPLE both upper and lower surfaces to give the silicone sealant a firmer grip, by lightly dimpling the surfaces over a large surface realy does increase the bond and tends to avoid leaks

http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=39940

http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=621

btw the correct length , threaded carb STUDS to mount the carb to the intake are far less likely to strip threads in the manifold

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look if your only installing a distributor after a manifold swap,and start from scratch on the ignition timing,
ITS not complicated, pull the #1 plug and put you thumb over the hole tightly, turn the engine in the normal direction of rotation, with a breaker bar and socket until you get compression in the #1 cylinder, as the damper TDC line approaches the TDC timing tab, drop the distributor in with the rotor facing the #1 cylinder,compensate for the way the distributor gear causes the rotor to rotate as in seats,so its seated pointing where you intended, if it won,t fully seat turn the oil pump drive with a very large flat blade screw driver until it will,with the distributor removed and try again, once it seats,facing the correct direction, install and tighten the distributor clamp so its difficult to spin the distributor easily by hand but still possible to spin the distributor by hand, re-install the #1 plug and wire, install the cap and all ignition related wires, use your timing light and set the ignition timing,per the shop manuals instructions, tighten the distributor hold clamp so it can,t move, IF it takes more than 10 minutes your in need of more practice or nearly hopeless as a mechanic.The CLOYES true roller style is vastly superior to the factory link belt design

lets drop to basics,
the crank socket has an index groove that matches a key in the crank snout, and you must use the matched set of timing gears (cam and crank) not for example use the new cam gear with the old crank gear for two main reasons, first the old gears have formed a wear pattern, that won,t exactly match the new chain and that tends to accelerate wear on the new chain slightly, and second , different manufacturers tend to mark and index the gears slightly differently, and while in theory both the pin in the cam gear and the woodrif key in the crank gear limit the chances of a mis-match theres occasionally a couple of degrees of difference in mis-matched sets
be aware that some crank gears have more than one index slot to index to the crank key and each slot is marked and you must use the correct matching marks indicating (ZERO) that match the crank slot marks

sum-g6600_w.jpg

look closely SLOT A uses a different TDC mark (A) than slot (R), which has its own TDC mark(R)
CrankGear_0222.jpg

viewtopic.php?f=59&t=901&p=1462&hilit=puller#p1462
most guys oil the crank snout and heat the crank gear slightly and tap it on with a large socket

but yes theres a tool
http://www.summitracing.com/parts/CCA-4789/
cca-4789_w.jpg

notice the (O) thats supposed to be indexed at 12 o,clock
and matched to a cam timing gear at 6 o,clock, which temporarily places the #6 cylinder at TDC, you then simply rotate the crank one complete turn, bring the cam timing gear to its 12 0,clock position,and the #1 cylinders at TDC and you can drop the intake on, and distributor in and adjust the valve lash clearance (solid lifters) or pre-load (hydraulic lifters, and set the ignition timing at about 8 degrees btdc as a starting location

you can use a dead blow hammer or the damper tool to install the gear
41800.gif

http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/d ... mber=41800

http://www.summitracing.com/parts/OTC-6505/

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=90

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read
http://www.centuryperformance.com/tunin ... g-148.html


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http://boxwrench.net/specs/chevy_sb.htm
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drop the distributor in with the rotor pointing at the #1 cylinder, and YEAH! it physically possible to get the distributors rotor to point at any place you want it too by changing the oil pump drive shaft alignment with a large flat blade screw driver while the distributors out of the engine and that's easily changed, but to do it correctly,you want the rotor to point at the #1 cylinder on the compression stroke, so pull the #1 plug, get a large ratchet/socket on the damper and put your finger over the open plug hole and slowly rotate the engine by hand in its normal rotational direction until you see pressure build under your finger as the rotor approaches #1 cylinder location on the distributor base which you should have marked as its supposed to be in direct alignment between the distributor and the number 1 cylinder on the engine,
remember the distributor and cam gears are helical and the rotor turns as it seats so compensate slightly. and the rotor should be just coming into alignment as pressure builds under your finger, once that's done re-install the distributor cap and plug and use a timing light to set the timing, you normally want about 6-12 degrees BTDC at idle and watch it advance to about 37 degrees as the rpms build to about 3000 rpm ok, then have you checked the distributor to oil pump drive shaft length?,
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IF YOUR DISTRIBUTOR LEAKS OIL AROUND THE BASE GASKET..
it seems the distributor is not seating fully against the intake ring gasket and the distributor to oil pump drive is suspected of being a bit to long, there should be about .050 slack MINIMUM between the oil pump drive shaft and the distributor gear.


lt1i.jpg

remember the oil pump drive only seats in two locations 180 degrees apart but it can be lined up anyplace you want with a 18" long large flat blade screw driver prior to installing the distributor from the top of the engine rather easily before you re-seat the distributor, but as the distributor gear teeth mesh the distributor will turn the rotor about 15 degrees
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http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/oil-pan-gaskets.206/#post-390
 
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Re: guide too re-installing the intake manifold

OK, youve installed the intake you got a such a (GREAT DEAL) on used from some guy you don,t know and it seems the intake leaks, now what?
obviously you need to find the reason, if the heads or intake were angle milled, to gain compression, the angles might not match correctly, and might require some re-machining , or a thicker gasket or the intake end rails milled, or the angle of the bolt holes or mating surfaces might need to be fixed to correct the fit,

viewtopic.php?f=44&t=822

http://www.circletrack.com/enginetech/c ... index.html

http://circletrack.automotive.com/79173 ... index.html

http://www.bhjproducts.com/bhj_download ... og_p21.pdf

http://www.goodson.com/technical_suppor ... illing.php

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you need an angle gauge, and large caliper to meassure both the intake and the head surfaces, and distances accurately, if they are machined wrong your screwed

http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/d ... mber=95998

http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/d ... mber=47261

ctrp_0312_05_z+cylinder_head+angle_milling.jpg


ctrp_0312_02_z+cylinder_head+angle_milling.jpg
 
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Re: guide too re-installing the intake manifold

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/which-sealant-goes-where.700/#post-43768


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ITS not complicated, pull the #1 plug and put you thumb over the hole tightly, turn the engine in the normal direction of rotation, with a breaker bar and socket until you get compression in the #1 cylinder, as the damper TDC line approaches the TDC timing tab, drop the distributor in with the rotor facing the #1 cylinder,compensate for the way the distributor gear causes the rotor to rotate as in seats,so its seated pointing where you intended, if it won,t fully seat turn the oil pump drive with a very large flat blade screw driver until it will,with the distributor removed and try again, once it seats,facing the correct direction, install and tighten the distributor clamp so its difficult to spin the distributor easily by hand but still possible to spin the distributor by hand, re-install the #1 plug and wire, install the cap and all ignition related wires, use your timing light and set the ignition timing,per the shop manuals instructions, tighten the distributor hold clamp so it can,t move, IF it takes more than 10 minutes your in need of more practice or nearly hopeless as a mechanic.
Make sure TDC on the damper is marked with white paint or chalk.
Crank the engine over with a breaker bar on the crank/damper bolt until you begin to come up on compression in number 1 cylinder. (A compression gauge will help if you are not sure how to do this.) As the compression rises up on the gauge, TDC will come around and will land under the pointer. ( I set mine up at 8 to 12 degrees BTC). This is the number 1 firing position.use a timing light and the timing tab to locate the timing on the dampers timing tape after you get it close to correct

keep in mind the distributor drive the oil pump shaft drive and its base will only seat on that shaft end in two positions and the cam and distributor gear teeth must mesh so the distributor rotor will rotate as its seated, and the teeth engage
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Id consider extending the threads in a hole drilled for the intake mount bolts in aluminum heads to about almost the full depth 1.2" depth the factory drilled the holes in aluminum heads to at least 1" depth after your finished fixing the threads,if you have any stripped thread issues and ID BE using studs with an allen key top to thread into the heads like bolts after the intakes installed so they have full thread engagement before you use a washer and nut to clamp the intake, because doing it that way will almost totally eliminate any possibility of the thread problems in the future, yes it takes a bit longer but it also prevents stripped threads

http://www.boltdepot.com/Product-Detail ... oduct=8567

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how come its 180 degs out of phase?
I get this question all the time, well here’s something I see lots of guys don’t understand, ONCE YOU'VE INSTALLED A CAM WITH THE TIMING MARKS YOU MUST ROTATE THE CRANK 360 DEGREES BEFORE DROPPING IN THE DISTRIBUTOR, while its true that if the, timing marks are positioned so the crank is at 12 o,clock and the cam gear is at 6 o,clock that the cam lobes will be in the position that fires #6 cylinder that HAS NO EFFECT AT ALL (on finding TDC,) for aligning the degree wheel with TDC,or THE timing tab pointer, for degreeing in the cam, the piston passes thru TDC TWICE in every firing cycle once on the firing/power stroke and once on the exhaust stroke, the cam rotates at exactly 1/2 the speed of the crank so to make it easy to line up the marks they install it with the marks at the closest point 6/12 for easy indexing, rotate the engine 360 degrees to the #1 TDC power stroke and the crank gear will still be at 12 o'clock 12/12 but the cam will be at 12 o,clock also, rotate another 360 degrees and your back where you started. its simply easier to index the cam at the point where the index marks align closely. look at how the cam lobes themselves open the valves when the cam is just installed the #1 cylinder valves are slightly open and the #6 are closed per "Lunati" ‘’YES YOU ARE RIGHT - WHEN CRANK IS AT TWELVE AND CAM IS AT SIX THEN #6 CYL IS FIRING AFTER YOU LINE UP YOUR MARKS AND INSTALL GEAR THEN ROTATE YOUR CRANK ONE REVOLUTION AND THEN DROP THE DIST. IN - AT THAT POINT
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http://boxwrench.net/specs/chevy_sb.htm
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Re: guide too re-installing the intake manifold

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/which-sealant-goes-where.700/#post-43768


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BTW I have on several occasions seen guys who complain about various oil leaks on valve covers and rear seals ETC.
Used, engine parts will have oil embedded deeply into the micro surfaces.
almost all replacement parts will have a wax or grease preservative coating to prevent corrosion during shipping!
IF YOU simply wipe off oil soaked surfaces with a paper towel, who then smear on the sealant of there choice and proceed to install gaskets,
YOU WILL OCCASIONALLY HAVE LEAKS!

and then they wonder or maybe be in shock when you find the seeping oil leak has returned in a few weeks time!
metal surfaces may look smooth as glass but under a microscope they look like the surface of the moon , with lots of jagged surface cracks, so you really need to wash out the micro lubricants trapped in those cracks with a thin fast evaporating grease solvent and a lint free rag , followed by a second repeat of the process and in many cases a few minutes with a heat gun to dry and evaporate the solvent in the micro cracks ,
STOP AND READ THE SEALANT PACKAGE DIRECTIONS!
you'll generally find some rather amazing , bits of info such as temperature requirements, temperature limitations, what solvents work best to remove the cement or sealant, only after reading the directions, do you then smear the gasket sealant on both mating surfaces before bonding the two gasket & metal surfaces.(and in many cases you use a brush as dirt or oil on fingers prevents a good seal!)
pontiac
http://www.boxwrench.net/specs/pont_265-455.htm

chevy sb
http://www.boxwrench.net/specs/chevy_sb.htm

chevy BB
http://www.boxwrench.net/specs/chevy_bb.htm

426hemi
http://www.boxwrench.net/specs/hemi_426.htm

383-440 mopar
http://www.boxwrench.net/specs/bchrys_B.htm

318-340-360 mopar
http://www.boxwrench.net/specs/schrys_A.htm

ford 429-460
http://www.boxwrench.net/specs/ford_429-514.htm

302-351 windsor ford
http://www.boxwrench.net/specs/ford_302_351W.htm

351 cleveland ford
http://www.boxwrench.net/specs/ford_351C.htm

352-428 ford
http://www.boxwrench.net/specs/ford_352-428.htm
INTAKE MANIFOLD REPLACEMENT (OFF THE INTERNET)
sbcintaketorque.jpg


1. Drain the coolant before removing the INTAKE MANIFOLD BOLTS. Remove the INTAKE MANIFOLD and all attachments.
2. Carefully SCRAPE the old gasket material off of the manifold mating surfaces with a putty knife to ensure that the new manifold will seal properly. Take care not to gouge these mating surfaces with the putty knife. CLEAN the head surfaces, the end seal surfaces, and the sealing surfaces of the manifold with some type of solvent that dries completely.
3. Lay the two side gaskets on the gasket card with the "This Side Up" down. APPLY a fairly healthy layer of PERMATEX “THE RIGHT STUFF” GASKET MAKER around each intake port ring. APPLY PERMATEX HI-TEMP RTV SILICONE GASKET SEALANT around the water ports on the end of each head SPARINGLY with your finger, and DRAG a little line out to the end seal area.
4. APPLY a line at least a 1/4" diameter of PERMATEX “THE RIGHT STUFF” GASKET MAKER across each end seal boss on the block.
5. INSTALL the two side gaskets onto the heads ("This Side Up" up), and seat the lower corners down even into the PERMATEX “THE RIGHT STUFF” GASKET MAKER on the end seal boss.
6. APPLY a fairly healthy layer of PERMATEX “THE RIGHT STUFF” GASKET MAKER around each intake port ring. WIPE PERMATEX HI-TEMP RTV SILICONE GASKET SEALANT around the water ports on the end of each head SPARINGLY with your finger, and DRAG a little line out to the end seal area.
7. Carefully lower the intake manifold onto the gaskets.
8. APPLY a small amount of PERMATEX HI-TEMP RTV SILICONE GASKET SEALANT to the threads of the intake manifold bolts, wait 5 or 10 minutes, and then install the bolts.
9. Use a torque wrench to tighten each intake manifold bolt using the factory pattern and specifications. Then do it again and again until no bolts pull up when you draw the torque. Let it sit for about 1 hour and do it again one more time.
10. Let it sit for a day and torque it again.
11. Reinstall all components, fill the radiator with coolant, and start the engine. After running the engine for 20 minutes torque the intake manifold bolts again.
 
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Hey Grumpy,I'm soon going to be removing the intake on my BBC,hopefully next week.I've got a couple of reasons for this;#1--Theres a small oil leak from the front china wall.#2--I want to pull my Isky EZRoll lifters and check them for any wear.#3--Check distributor gear for wear.I've got a funny feeling that the 2 bolt holes at the front of the intake may be stripped,or on the verge of stripping.I tried tightening them to see if I could stop the leak,but I might have overtightened them.( have aluminum Brodix heads).So I have a Helicoil kit and drill bit,2 different sets of intake gaskets,cleaners,silicone,etc..I will take pictures as I go along.I'm hoping it goes smoothly.I would also like to check valve lash,valve spring pressure and valve tip/rocker arm pattern.Plus I will clean & polish the intake & valve covers.I am going to plan on a week to do all this.This will be my last car project this year.I'm going back to work Oct 24 for the fall & winter work in the Alberta oil patch,so the Monte will be going away to winter storage before then.
Guy
 
you should have little trouble with a heli-coil kit repair on semi stripped threads,if its used per instructions

you might want to keep in mind that a BOLT by design induces far more stress on threads as the threads slide and tighten the tension load because the full thread surface is not engaged, during the clamp loading process, so individual sections of the threads surface are stressed far more during clamping loads, on aluminum the threads must have about 2 times the bolt diameter fully engaged before the clamp loads applied, to get the full potential holding strength, thats easy with studs but seldom with bolts because bolts frequently don,t have fully engaged threads while the clamp loads applied
http://www.tms.org/Students/Winners/Dav ... idson.html



intakeb1.jpg

than a stud thats fully thread engaged before clamping tension stress is applied, because of the angles you will need to use the style of studs that are installed with am allen key then drop on a spacer,clamping washer that spreads the clamp load and prevents the nut galling the aluminum below
bolts are ok when your using iron heads but aluminum's much softer in many head castings and the threads less robust and the threads far more susceptible to damage, from repeated heat and cooling, corrosion or just repeated use
intakeb3.jpg
 
I went the stud route for my intake install as well. Just installed it last weekend. One thing to mention is to watch your stud length. They will hit your pushrods if they are too long. It's hard to see in the pictures but I have a small OD washer underneath the 12 point nut.
 

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your photos and work looks great, I only wish I could take such great , clear photos
use of the studs ,too clamp the intake on the engine, shows professional pride in the assembly process

but Id point out that studs are best used with a thick hardened washer between the intake and clamping nut
hardened washers are usually black, thicker and smaller in outer diameter than typical flat stamped washers and just a bit larger than the nuts circumference, but having two hardened steel surfaces slide on each other rather than steel to aluminum makes for more consistent clamp loads and torque wrench readings



washer1q.jpg

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be aware that hardened washers come in several types and sizes so its best to order locally and actually look at what your buying and match it to the stud and bolt because a typical flat washers too large in diameter to fit in most intakes due to space limitations

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antiseize.jpg

antiseize on the stud threads helps reduce corroasion
 
Interesting reading,but unfortunately studs arent in the budget at this time,maybe next year.Maybe I should helicoil all the holes while I'm at it.
Guy
 
guysmontess said:
I just looked through Summit and didnt see any stud kits for a bbc.Where are they available at ???
Guy


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theres no specific kits, Im aware of but I buy them constantly, you just buy grade 8 studs with allen key socket ends , and matching hardened nuts and washer, usually 1.75"-to-2.25" long thread, in 3/8" NC, many larger hard ware stores sell them, just measure your current intake bolts, in most cases youll use a stud thats 1/2" longer
 
grumpyvette said:
but Id point out that studs are best used with a thick hardened washer between the intake and clamping nut
hardened washers are usually black, thicker and smaller in outer diameter than typical flat stamped washers and just a bit larger than the nuts circumference, but having two hardened steel surfaces slide on each other rather than steel to aluminum makes for more consistent clamp loads and torque wrench readings


Yep, It took me some time to find the right washers. Locally, I couldn't find any small outside diameter washers much less hardened. So, I took some measurements and did a search on Summit.

Here's the washers that ended up being a good fit. http://www.summitracing.com/parts/ARP-200-8404
Purchased individual

Here's the nuts I used. http://www.summitracing.com/parts/ARP-301-8341
I had to order 2 singles for a total of 12

And the studs came from bolt depot. http://www.boltdepot.com/Product-Details.aspx?product=8567
Probably could have used the 1 1/2 stud and not have the 1/4 inch or so sticking out above the nut. But I kinda like the look.
 
Anyhow,I'm hoping to get started on this project tomorrow.I dont want to rush through it,I'll keep you updated as I go along.
Guy
 
I got a couple of things accomplished this morning.Got both valve covers off and checked valve lash,(cold),all are at 0.008,which equals 0.014 hot when you add in 0.006 for al heads & cast block when cold.Also checked valve spring pressures,all were good,and I also checked the valve tip pattern on a couple of valves and those looked good as well.I'm hoping to get the intake off this afternoon.
Guy
 
I made some more progress yesterday,the carb & distributor are off,coolant is drained and hoses are off,the alternator bracket is off and I got the intake off.I did a visual inspection of the lifters and cam lobes and they show no signs of unusual wear.The distributor gear looks like new.I had 2 sets of lifters out,# 1 & # 2,and they look to be in excellent shape,the wheels are nice and tight and roll smoothly.Pictures to follow later.
Guy
 

I have a feeling something really bad is going to happen, it's going way to smoothly ! :p

Looking forward to some pictures!!!
 
I'm hoping to have the intake,carb & dist back on today.I spent some time yesterday cleaning and polishing my Weiand Stealth intake,so it looks decent again.Dont want to rush into anything :D
Guy
 
I finished up yesterday,got it fired up and working good.I checked every one of the Isky EZRoll lifters,these have a bushing instead of needles.My checking method wasnt what you would call scientific,I visually & physically inspected all of them,rolled the wheel,checked for any unwanted movement,etc.,and they all seemed fine to me.If I was closer to California I would send them in to Isky for a true evaluation,but shipping would take forever from here.I've put app 14,000 miles on these lifters in 5 summers,they see very little idle time,lots of highway miles,some of those were at 3500 RPM + for an hour or two at a time,a couple of trips to the track,and lots of "spirited" back road driving.The oil gets changed every 2-2500 miles,valve lash gets checked twice a summer,and I've checked spring pressures a couple of times.I also checked all the Jesel shaft rockers & Manton pushrods,and they look just like new,they have app 6-7000 miles on them.It boils down to the fact that solid roller gear needs maintenance,theres no such thing as bulletproof,although I feel that I am pretty darn close.I followed suggestions here,the end rails were dimpled,everything was cleaned thouroughly,intake carefully lined up,etc..I put a little bit of Gasgacinch around the ports,a tiny bit of silicone on the end rails and let it sit for a few minutes,threw the rubber end gaskets away.I did have 2 plug wires mixed up,but that was a simple fix.Got the timing set and went for a drive.
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IntakeRR019.jpg

IntakeRR021.jpg

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