bits of 383 info

grumpyvette

Administrator
Staff member
got asked recently what hydraulic roller cam ID suggest for a street/strip 383 combo?(obviously theres a wide selection that may work,)
theres at least a few hours of very worth while , and quite useful reading in this thread and links that will prevent you wasting time and money, keep in mind the sub links contain a huge wealth of additional info youll need
what seems to be over-looked in many engine builds is simply the fact you'll almost always DEEPLY regret jumping into the engine build with both feet and waving your check book as you sink ever deeper into piles of parts receipts and machine shop bills, rather than stepping back with a legal pad, and a calculator and listing in minute detail exactly what you want to accomplish, and taking the time and effort too list and check out in detail what each machine shop procedure costs, why its required and how much each components costs, what your options are and how each component will add too or benefit the completed combo (or in some cases cause you time and grief)
stepping back and thinking things through in detail and listing the cost and potential problems and finding the solutions BEFORE you dive into the process may be a lot less fun, but in the long term its sure to cost less and result in a far better finished project!

you might be amazed at what a couple hours research into the subject will do to help you build a much more durable engine, and actually reading thru links and sub-links and asking questions helps a great deal
many guys ignore proven combos, because it may cost more than they want to spend, and either insist on using components they own currently or think they can buy far less expensively than the components, I know from experience will actually work.
http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...hing-the-drive-train-to-the-engine-combo.741/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...electing-a-torque-converter-stall-speed.1715/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...late-gear-ratios-and-when-to-shift-calcs.555/

all it takes is a tiny bit of research and some math to calculate the ideal rear differential gearing, tires size etc. and transmission gear ratios, and you can certainly select the correct torque converter stall speed if you have a dyno graph of your engines power curve without much difficulty, an hour or so spent in reading and research will provide you with a great deal better performance from most cars.
and a couple days worth of research and doing some math on all of the power trains component parts will provide you with a wealth of info that can prevent you from making costly mistakes.
read the links and sub links below

a day or so spent doing reading and research,
(reading links and threads)

will frequently save you thousands of dollars and weeks of wasted work.
if you want a fast dependable car you will need to either do the research required to know exactly how and why things should work, or pay someone else to do the work that has taken that time and effort.


high volume oil pumps use is far more beneficial than high peak pressure in oil pumps,
remember peak pressure only happens at higher rpms and tests show,
no benefits in long term engine durability,
if peak oil pressure exceeds 65 psi or higher.

read links and sub links





READ THESE LINK'S OVER CAREFULLY TWICE
http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/finding-a-machine-shop.321/#post-55314

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...lap-on-factory-headers.3155/page-2#post-66722


ONE GENTLEMAN pointed out ,after shopping around one of the least expensive deals seems to be the EDELBROCK CAM BELOW

http://www.jegs.com/i/Edelbrock/350/22015/10002/-1#

viewtopic.php?f=53&t=7995

http://www.hotrod.com/how-to/engine...-assembly-for-a-stroker-383-chevrolet-engine/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/should-you-buy-bare-or-assembled-heads.534/

http://www.airflowresearch.com/articles/SBC/biggerbetter/big.php
(hit cancel the info appears)
http://www.themotorbookstore.com/resmchstvi.html

http://www.amazon.com/Lingenfelter-Modi ... 82&sr=8-11"]Amazon.com: John Lingenfelter on Modifying Small-block Chevy Engines (0075478012381): John Lingenfelter: Books

http://www.amazon.com/Smokey-Yunicks-Po ... 809&sr=8-2"]Amazon.com: Smokey Yunick's Power Secrets (9780931472060): Smokey Yunick: Books

http://www.summitracing.com/popup/calcsandtools/stroker-combinations

http://www.airflowresearch.com/articles/SBC/biggerbetter/big.php
(hit cancel the info appears)
383vs350.png


http://www.airflowresearch.com/super-chevy-apr-2010-210cc-sbc.php

http://www.hotrod.com/how-to/engine...-assembly-for-a-stroker-383-chevrolet-engine/

buy these book/video's its probably the best money value you can get, you might be amazed at what a couple hours research into the subject will do to help you build a much more durable engine, and actually reading thru links and sub-links and asking questions helps a great deal

milling stroker clearance on 350/383


http://www.hotrod.com/how-to/engine/ccrp-0808-383-stroker-small-block-chevy/

http://www.superchevy.com/how-to/engine ... m#cxrecs_s

http://www.superchevy.com/how-to/engine ... shaft.html

http://www.flatlanderracing.com/probe-sportsbc04.html

http://www.maintenanceresources.com/ref ... alance.htm

viewtopic.php?f=53&t=1168

http://www.circletrack.com/enginetech/c ... rminology/


viewtopic.php?f=53&t=8310&p=28891#p28891

viewtopic.php?f=69&t=2378&p=6279&hilit=hemi#p6279

viewtopic.php?f=53&t=141&p=5391&hilit=internal+external#p5391

viewtopic.php?f=56&t=495

http://www.strokerengine.com/SBCHeadsFlow.html

viewtopic.php?f=50&t=46&p=1541#p1541

viewtopic.php?f=69&t=8540&p=30192#p30192

viewtopic.php?f=44&t=366&p=448#p448

viewtopic.php?f=38&t=3900&p=10338#p10338

http://www.summitracing.com/popup/calcsandtools/stroker-combinations

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...ty-thats-key-in-building-a-good-engine.11682/



http://www.chevyhiperformance.com/techa ... ine_build/

viewtopic.php?f=50&t=46&p=55&hilit=+books+video#p55
FlatVsRollerChart.gif

notice its right where the roller cams lobe design maximized the extra air flow potential that is the most effective flow area during the whole valve flow curve
and yes it frequently helps to match a roller cam to roller rockers as the reduced friction further helps the engines durability and ability to easily cope with faster valve train component acceleration, that tends to reduce heat and wear.
The following equation mathematically defines the available flow area for any given valve diameter and lift value:
Area = valve diameter x 0.98 x 3.14 x valve lift
Where 3.14 = pi (π)
For a typical 2.02-inch intake valve at .500-inch lift, it calculates as follows:
Area = 2.02 x 0.98 x 3.14 x 0.500 = 3.107 square inches, thus it makes a great deal of sense to push the valve lift a bit over .500, and have an intake port that is at least 3.2 square inches in cross sectional area, if you want to maximize flow on a 2.02" intake valve
porting+valve_area.jpg



LiftCurveAread.gif



http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...-the-extra-cost-vs-a-flat-tappet-design.3802/

SB-Chevy 283-400 Hydraulic Roller Camshaft Kit

Duration Advertised 296° Intake/300° Exhaust
Duration @ .050'' 234° Intake/238° Exhaust
Lift @ Valve .539'' Intake/.548'' Exhaust
Lift @ Cam .359'' Intake/.365'' Exhaust
Lobe Separation Angle 112°
Intake Centerline 107°
Intake Timing @ .050" Open 10° BTDC
Close 44° ABDC
Exhaust Timing @ .050" Open 56° BBDC
Close 2° ATDC

A FEW HOURS OR EVEN DAYS ,SPENT READING LINKS AND SUB LINKS CAN SAVE YOU MONTHS OF WORK AND THOUSANDS OF DOLLARS


viewtopic.php?f=52&t=5078

viewtopic.php?f=69&t=7722

viewtopic.php?f=69&t=7771

viewtopic.php?f=69&t=7028

http://chevyhighperformance.automotive. ... index.html

IVE used similar cam designs (serration/lift/)in the past with excellent results and $709 for the cam, roller lifters and push rods is a good value, naturally the REST of the components and the cars drive train and the cars intended use will effect the choice
the only thing that makes me hesitate is the quality of edelbrocks cam cores.AS most IVE SEEN are not billet but cast cores which are less durable and on a 383, PLUS you want a small base circle cam......for rotating assembly clearance issues ,one reason I usually suggest this cam in similar combos

one very common mistake is selecting a cam duration, rear gear ratio, compression ratio or set of heads that can,t operate with the other components in the same power band efficiently
the best heads matched to a restrictive intake or the wrong cam will result in a DOG just as surely as a great intake and crappy heads with low compression, or any of a few dozen other miss-matched parts.
if you want impressive bragging level hp you need to design a combo capable of operating efficiently above 5800-6000rpm but thats NOT necessarily going to be a good street engine

example
horsepower =torque times rpm divided by 5252
so 370ft lbs at 3700rpm=261hp
but 370ft lbs at 5700rpm=401hp
and the heads , rear gear ratio,and cam that operate effectively at 3700rpm wont be the same as those matched to 5700rpm, you might also keep in mind youll make approximately 1.1-1.2 hp per cubic inch of displacement and piston speeds below 4200fpm are strongly recommended for long term durability, and hydraulic lifter valve trains seldom do well over 6300rpm, and about 10.2:1 static compression is about the max crappy pump gas will tolerate IF MATCHED TO THE CORRECT COMBO
theres a HUGE MIS -CONCEPTION out there that its always the larger port cross sectional area on any engine that lacks low speed torque, thats responsible for a loss of low speed torque, in most cases it is the combo of a larger than ideal for the application cam duration and a single plane intake, and larger and shorter headers or a restrictive exhaust having been selected ,NOT the cylinder heads port size.
YES cylinder head port cross section will effect the port velocity, but in most cases if your building a performance street cars engine your better off going slightly larger on port size and slightly conservative on the cam duration.

READ THESE LINKS

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=333

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=8460

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=322

http://airflowresearch.com/articles/article093/A-P1.htm

IF your having issues with low rpm torque with a 383-406 SBC youve built ask yourself some questions
WHAT CAM ARE YOU USING?
WHATS YOUR IGNITION ADVANCE CURVE?
WHATS YOUR FUEL/AIR RATIO AT PEAK TORQUE?
WHATS YOUR FUEL PRESSURE EVERY 1000,RPM
WHATS YOUR HEADERS BACK PRESSURE AT PEAK TORQUE?
WHAT INTAKE MANIFOLD ARE YOU USING?
whats the PLENUM VACUUM READ AT 2500RPM?, 4500RPM? 6000RPM?
ARE YOU RUNNING A WELL MATCHED REAR GEAR RATIO AND CONVERTER STALL SPEED?
DOES YOUR DRIVE TRAIN GEARING AND TIRE SIZE MATCH THE ENGINES POWER CURVE?

0607phr_11_z+camshaft_basics+lobe_centerline_angle_determination_chart.jpg

combining the info posted a 383 sbc has 47.8 cubic inches per cylinder divided by 2.02=23.7 on the chart above, so youll find cams in the correct duration range having a tight 105-108 lSA most efficient at filling the cylinders in many combos,
Duration_v_RPM-Range_wIntakeManifold01.jpg


CamUsageChart01.jpg



you WILL find these threads and sub linked info BELOW VERY useful, so skipping over them is not the best route to take here, yes I know you are most likely not into extensive reading, its worth the time

SAFE piston speeds are best restricted to 4000fpm for stock components and 4500fpm for the better common aftermarket components

viewtopic.php?f=53&t=343&p=16772&hilit=redline#p16772

viewtopic.php?f=53&t=341

viewtopic.php?f=54&t=2187&p=5890#p5890

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=5078

viewtopic.php?f=53&t=2726&p=26440#p26440

viewtopic.php?f=50&t=428

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/sbc-spacer-bearings.3058/

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=5078

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=5734&p=17492&hilit=heat+chain+moly#p17492

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=181&p=215#p215

viewtopic.php?f=69&t=8540

http://www.airflowresearch.com/articles ... 5/A-P1.htm

http://www.airflowresearch.com/articles ... 1/A-P1.htm

viewtopic.php?f=53&t=10213

http://www.skipwhiteperformance.com/det ... 3831P-1230

http://www.chevymania.com/tech/383.htm

viewtopic.php?f=71&t=741&p=1048#p1048

viewtopic.php?f=53&t=8685&p=30565#p30565

viewtopic.php?f=55&t=8485

http://www.airflowresearch.com/articles ... A16-P1.htm

http://www.hotrod.com/techarticles/engi ... ewall.html

http://www.cranecams.com/index.php?s...61&lvl=2&prt=5

http://www.jegs.com/i/Crane/270/119661/10002/-1#

http://www.jegs.com/webapp/wcs/store...hTerm=11532-16

Grind Number: HR-230/359-2S-12.90 IG
Operating Range: 3000-6500 RPM
Duration Advertised: 292° Intake / 300° Exhaust
Duration @ .050'' Lift: 230° Intake / 238° Exhaust
Valve Lift w/1.5 Rockers: .539'' Intake / .558'' Exhaust
Lobe Separation Angle: 112°
Max Lift Angle: 107° ATDC Intake / 117° BTDC Exhaust
Open/Close @.050'' Cam Lift: Intake - 8° BTDC (opens) / 42° ABDC (closes)
Exhaust - 56° BBDC (opens) / 2° ATDC (closes)


with either cam youll want a 3000rpm stall converter , about 10.5:1 cpr and a 3.73-4.11:1 rear gear to maximize the performance and a low restriction exhaust, headers and a high flow intake

IM currently running the crane 119661 cam in MY 383 and Ive tested over a dozen cams in that engine, so if its a street/strip combo ID suggest going that route, SMALL BASE CIRCLE AND BILLET CORE.....yeah! YOU GET WHAT YOU PAY,FOR and DURABILITY FOR PARTS TENDS TO COST MORE
__________________
these related links and their sub links will help a good deal IF YOU TAKE THE TIME TO READ THRU THEM

YES IT WILL TAKE HOURS TO READ THRU THE LINKED INFO...IT WILL ALSO SAVE YOU HUNDREDS OF DOLLARS AND WEEKS OF WORK
,

YOU CAN LEARN A GREAT DEAL, ABOUT COMBOS THAT WORK, IF YOU READ THRU ALL THE LINKS AND SUB LINKED INFO BELOW
viewtopic.php?f=69&t=519

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=727

viewtopic.php?f=50&t=3156&p=8424#p8424

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=1070

http://www.carcraft.com/techarticles/cc ... ewall.html

viewtopic.php?f=44&t=38

viewtopic.php?f=69&t=4120

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=5537&p=16744#p16744

http://www.brodix.com/heads/tonydyno.html

http://www.sporttruck.com/howto/40619/index.html

viewtopic.php?f=44&t=38&p=26432&hilit=+known+engine+combo#p26432

viewtopic.php?f=69&t=5357&p=16030#p16030

viewtopic.php?f=50&t=111

viewtopic.php?f=50&t=1249

viewtopic.php?f=51&t=125

viewtopic.php?f=50&t=1859

viewtopic.php?f=51&t=2919

viewtopic.php?f=50&t=4925

viewtopic.php?f=54&t=2187

viewtopic.php?f=51&t=1458

http://bracketmasters.com/small_block_s ... 383_cu.htm

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=181

viewtopic.php?f=54&t=64&p=77#p77

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=90

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=5078

http://www.summitracing.com/parts/SUM-150100/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/tips-on-building-a-383-sbc-stroker.428/

viewtopic.php?f=50&t=4925&p=13605#p13605

viewtopic.php?f=59&t=1026&p=1900#p1900

viewtopic.php?f=50&t=3156&p=8424#p8424

viewtopic.php?f=50&t=1249&p=2674#p2674

viewtopic.php?f=53&t=852&p=1311#p1311

viewtopic.php?f=44&t=392&p=5415#p5415

http://www.vsihp.com/library/CleviteEng ... sGuide.pdf

viewtopic.php?f=53&t=247

viewtopic.php?f=54&t=2294&p=13460#p13460

viewtopic.php?f=50&t=1249

http://www.chevyhiperformance.com/tech/ ... ewall.html

http://www.carcraft.com/techarticles/cc ... index.html

http://bracketmasters.com/small_block_s ... 383_cu.htm

http://www.compcams.com/catalog/COMP201 ... 010_10.pdf

viewtopic.php?f=53&t=2726

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=462&p=7399&hilit=porting#p7399

viewtopic.php?f=51&t=1718&p=4257&hilit=+silicone+gasket#p4257

viewtopic.php?f=62&t=1430&hilit=+silicone+gasket

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...ber-of-people-that-don-t-use-resources.12125/

viewtopic.php?f=32&t=459&p=563&hilit=+silicone+gasket#p563

viewtopic.php?f=54&t=206&p=390&hilit=+silicone+gasket#p390

its really refreshing to see someone take the effort to do those clearance checks that are so critical to long term durability


for those just starting on their 383 build ups heres some very useful linked info

http://www.hotrod.com/howto/69883_strok ... to_07.html

http://www.superchevy.com/technical/eng ... index.html

http://www.carcraft.com/techarticles/cc ... index.html


BIGGER is NOT always BETTER, and since both the header primary diam. and length and the collectors , which have a huge effect on the resulting scavenging can,t be changed as we change engine rpms, we need to maximize the cylinder scavenging characteristics so as to maximize the cylinder filling and extend the rpm band of the torque curve but once your have the collectors and headers primary designed to maximize the scavenging in your chosen and intended rpm range and run the collectors to a (X) to induce both increased scavenging and lower restriction to flow theres not much that a larger exhaust past that point can do badly but increase the noise levels while it should be rather obvious that a smaller than ideal exhaust will hurt the upper rpm band as it tends to be a restriction
yes if you have a smaller exhaust diam. it tends to act like an extended collector and increase low rpm torque at the cost OF being A restriction ONCE THE RPMS BUILD PAST A CERTAIN POINT.
having both collectors empty into an (X) pipe EFFECTIVELY instantly doubles the cross sectional area of the exhaust pulse and significantly reduces the return reflected pressure wave, almost making the collectors act as if its running without any restriction compared to a true dual exhaust IF the exhaust pipes are large enough to provide a very low restriction at that point



as I POINTED OUT ABOVE...
theres plenty of fluid dynamics math and research out there to show that the distances the exhaust travels between exhaust pulses and the diam. and length are easily calculated, and past that length the second previous pulse has little effect compared to the current and previous pulse energy and reflective wave
and lets not forget the cam timing displacement and intake port all effect the cylinder scavenging the headers can effectively provide also

http://www.engr.colostate.edu/~allan...ngth/pipe.html

http://www.rbracing-rsr.com/runnertorquecalc.html

http://victorylibrary.com/mopar/header-tech-c.htm

http://www.headerdesign.com/

http://www.pontiacracing.net/js_header_length1.htm

http://www.slowgt.com/Calc2.htm#Header
ebm1.jpg

ebm2.jpg

ebm3.jpg

ebm4.jpg

ebm5.jpg

use a good 7-8 quart baffled oil pan, the added capacity and baffles add a good bit more durability
canton2.jpg

canton2A.jpg

if you look very carefully at this canton oil pan youll notice the oil pan rail is dimpled outward to increase rod clearance on the longer 3.75" stroke cranks
most stock oil pans will require a bit of clearance work with a ball peen hammer near the oil pan rail, to move the wall near the seal rail where the gaskets seals,outward in a similar adjustment , to allow the longer stroker crank assembly to clear,but the MASSAGE WORK rarely requires more than a .080 outward adjustment on each side wall WHERE the rod cap rod bolts come the closest to the oil pan rail/wall, and most stock oil pans will accept that without issue!
mor-20195.jpg



mor-38350_w.jpg

On oil pans I prefer studs, and an oil pan back plate
panback1.jpg

fel-0534510t.jpg

you might want to Use with P/N 12553058 RH and P/N 12553059 LH oil pan reinforcement plates to distribute the bolt stress on the oil pan rail for 1985 and earlier oil pans P/N 14088501 (LH) and P/N 14088502 (RH).1986 and newer
Id say its a VERY bad idea personally , if you shop carefully you can find a reasonably priced 6- 7 quart oil pan that should help engine durability.
SHOP CAREFULLY ,
WHEN YOU GO TO BUY AN OIL PAN for your engine or transmission,
<AND ASK LOTS OF QUESTIONS ABOUT WHAT WILL FIT YOUR CAR CORRECTLY,
AND ASK FOR SUGGESTIONS ON MATCHING COMPONENTS OR PARTS THAT WON,T FIT
many guys ignore proven combos, because it may cost more than they want to spend, and either insist on using components they own currently or think they can buy far less expensively than the components, I know from experience will actually work.

MILODON,
http://www.milodon.com/

CHAMP
http://www.champpans.com/products/c/oil-pans/

CANTON,
https://www.cantonracingproducts.com/category/1501/Chevy-SS--Road-Race-Oil-Pans/1.html

MOROSO
http://www.moroso.com/
http://www.shopmoroso.com/eb/catalog/navigationPath/1::Moroso Performance Products/1100001::Oil Pans/11005::Chevy Big Block, Gen VGen VI?resetOffset=true&entryId=catalog.productgroup.1110000111005&expand=true&menuId=main.menu

AVIAID
http://aviaid.com/shopsite_sc/store/html/ws_oilpns_sbc.html

STEFS
http://www.stefs.com/products/oilpans/circletrackwetsump.htm

HAMBURGERPERFORMANCE
http://www.hamburgersperformance.com/

KEVKO
https://kevko.myshopify.com/

IF you've wondered why I suggest buying and using a well designed BAFFLED oil pan with 7-8 quart capacity its to prevent the oil from uncovering the oil pump pick-up under performance use.
without control baffles oil sloshes away from the oil pump pick-up

Slosh1.jpg

Slosh3.jpg


Slosh2.jpg



obviously you,ll want to ask specific questions as to the ,
ground clearance, starters that can be used,
oil filters, oil dip stick, location,
oil pan gasket matching both pan and lock used.
rear oil seal type,and frame and suspension clearance issues,
related to your car, before you purchase any oil pan

I think the hamburger oil pan is a better value At $242
notice the better oil control features

https://www.summitracing.com/parts/ham-1088/overview/
ham-1088.jpg




http://www.milodon.com/oil-pans/street-oil-pans-sbchevy.asp

http://www.jegs.com/p/Moroso/Moroso-Street-Strip-Oil-Pans/763991/10002/-1

https://www.summitracing.com/search/brand/hamburgers-performance/part-type/oil-pans

https://www.cantonracingproducts.com/cgi-bin/commerce.cgi?search=action&category=1301

http://www.stefsperformance.net/ste...oil-pans/aluminum-oil-pans-pumps#!prettyPhoto

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...l-level-in-oil-pan-with-engine-running.11263/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/oil-system-mods-that-help.2187/#post-7231

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/bearings-and-oil-flow.150/#post-68206

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...ed-holes-in-bearings-shells.10750/#post-64733

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...es-engine-builders-magazine.11965/#post-57052

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...te-filter-require-a-new-pump.3144/#post-16458

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...l-cooler-increases-durability.176/#post-12473

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...essure-bye-pass-circuit-works.3536/#post-9379

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/oil-system-basics.615/#post-1731

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/engine-oil-temps.296/#post-361

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/whats-a-windage-tray-do.64/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/installing-an-oil-pump-pick-up-tube.1800/


yeah it takes time and experience too get it done correctly but its just not that difficult to do with very little practice, you may also need to grind the block for rod clearance in some cases with some rods, but be aware that there are rods specifically designed to allow increased clearance that require little or now work to clear a stock block or oil pan

blockskirt8.JPG

hvsiclear1.jpg

if you wonder why I suggest using SCAT (H) beam style cap screw connecting rods vs stock or most (I) beam designs this picture should show the increased cam to connecting rod clearance

LETS ASSUME I WANT MY 383 TO MAKE MAX POWER IN THE 5000RPM-6300RPM BAND (mostly so I can run street gears and pump high test gas and a low maintenance hydraulic roller cam, and IM willing to sacrifice a good deal of street drive-ability to maximize my corvettes track potential)

using the above calculators we quickly find I should have about a 3 sq inch intake port cross sectional area, the exhaust should be about 39" long in the primary 1.825 diam,and about 18" -20" long in the collector, about 3"-3.5" diam.
a matching compression of about 10.5:1-11:1 and a cam in the 230-235 duration range at .050 lift, heads that have the same 3 sq inch port and flow about 280cfm this will tend to maximize the power at THAT rpm band, and ideally a 3.90:1-4.11:1 rear gear ratio and a 3000rpm-3500rpm stall converter
but that above will NOT work nearly as well as a smaller and less radical combo in the 1500rpm-4500rpm most cars spend 90% of their time in
its all a compromise and most people don,t realize how miserable that combo will make the daily driven car that rarely get above 4500rpm, where a smaller and longer exhaust would scavenge more effectively but give up some of the potential for max power when the cars raced
your 100% correct if you were looking to cruise at 2500rpm , the cams above will be a P.I.T.A. on a car designed mostly for mid rpm cruising, you could get good performance from them but the street manors in traffic will be less than ideal....certainly manageable but not exactly smooth

youll be far better off with something similar to these, if street manors and low to mid rpm cruising are a higher priority, but have a LONG talk with the manufacturer of your choice about your combo and expectations before selecting your cam and matching your combo gearing and compression, head lift restrictions and flow characteristics

http://www.tpis.com/index.php?module...draulic+Roller

ZZ-9 Hydraulic Roller:
Intake Exhaust This is an emission legal cam which makes
Advertised Duration 282/ 287 over 400HP with our CNC"D LT heads and
Duration at .050 212 /226 F-car headers. Great with an auto or six
Gross Lift .483/.520 speed.
Lobe Separation 112


http://www.crower.com/misc/m_cat.shtml

http://www.crower.com/misc/cam_spec/...00466&x=38&y=9

http://www.cranecams.com/?show=brows...tType=camshaft

Im running that crane 119661 cam retarded 4 degrees BTW but detonation has not been a problem, remember that the coolant temp, air temps the engine sees, QUENCH distance, type of head gasket and its construction ,ignition advance,plug heat range,piston to bore clearance, exhaust valve seat width, and oil temp and pollishing your combustion chamber and piston domes, and your AIR/FUEL RATIO , and the effective DYNAMIC compression ratio, have a noticable effect on detonation
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when you build an engine you generally have some idea as to its intended operational rpm range and the octane level of the fuel you want to use.
normal quality blended gasoline tends to produce its best power at about a 12.5:1 fuel/air ratio, and lowest exhaust emissions at about a 14.7:1 f/a ratio
the higher the effective compression ratio (up to about 13:1) the more torque you can expect to produce from an engine,if you use, high octane gas or race fuels, but the octane of the fuel currently available from pump gas drops the max effective dynamic compression ratio to about 8:1
obviously the components selected must work in the desired rpm and intended power range.
you need to select a cam duration and LSA , and static compression that BOTH matches the static compression ratio and your cars gearing so the effective dynamic compression ratio falls in that range, and intended rpm/power band
obviously if your willing to run race octane fuel and operate the engine at higher average rpms you can increase the cam duration and static compression ratio
BEFORE you buy connecting rods ,talk to SCAT tech guys, before you order connecting rods, and discuss what your doing,and your options and what parts you currently have and part compatibility.
the rods you link too use 3/8" rod bolts
either rod choice is a noticeable improvement over the stock connecting rods being rebuilt.
http://www.summitracing.com/parts/sca-25700p/overview/
sca-25700p_w.jpg

here the rods (LINK BELOW)
I generally use on mild performance builds requiring 5.7" rods, but Id ask about the pistons because I generally use full float piston designs
the reason is that these are exceptionally strong rods with 7/16" arp rod bolts, the rod bolt size alone increases strength over 20% but the 200k psi steel is easily 30% stronger than most oem steel rod bolts, increasing the strength of the rotating assembly by easily 50%-70% over stock components

these rods use the stronger 7/16' and its a significantly stronger connecting rod, yes the cost is about $90 more a set, but thats peanuts in the total build cost and the strength is a good increase over both stock and the other rods

http://www.summitracing.com/parts/sca-2 ... /overview/
sca-25700_w.jpg

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http://www.daytona-sensors.com/tech_tuning.html

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yes the cam lobes can very easily contact the connecting rods when the cam index is out of its proper timing, on almost any chevy engine the cam lobe center lines will be spaced at between 103 and 116 degrees, with the piston at TDC theres SUPPOSED to be about .060 MINIMUM clearance between the connecting rod bolts and cam lobes, this is a mandatory clearance check point and a plastic cable tie can be used to gauge clearance, its best done on each individual connecting rod to cam lobe clearance point AFTER the cams been degreed into the block as each connecting rods being installed but Ive generally done it during the several trial assembly points where I check other clearances like block to connecting rod clearance.

thats why on some stroker crank engines a SMALL BASE CIRCLE cam is used to MAXIMIZE CLEARANCE,between the two moving parts.
a cams lobe lift is the difference the lifter moves off the cams base circle between its base circle and its max lobe lift, thus a cam with a 1.1" diam base circle and a .400 lobe lift would have a , .400 lobe lift and if you had 1.5:1 ratio rockers a .600 valve lift, but if you wanted more clearance you could use a smaller base circle at .900, and a 400 lobe lift this would allow the connecting rod, to sweep by with an additional amount of cam lobe to connecting rod bolt clearance, the change in diameter generally requires a swap to a stronger cam billet core . vs cheaper cast core,to maintain cam strength

removing the rod caps during clearance checks while building your 383 ,does seem to allow you to see the clearance issues a bit easier

a fairly well known and rather successful 383 sbc combo thats fairly economical to build is The scat 9000 series crank for 6 inch rods will internally balance little problem,
The scat I beams with 7/16 bolts are the way to go, the Mahle or Wiseco, J&E, TRW and TRICKFLOW pistons all work with good results.
The Heads you select should flow at least 250 cfm at .600 lift minimum,
(250 CFM AT .500 lift is even better) if your using an dual plane Air Gap intake the Dart SHP 180 or 180cc AFR heads are a good choice, a 750cfm-to-850 cfm, works well.
If your using a single plane intake go with the Dart SHP 200, or BRODIX 200cc runner or 195 AFR heads, provided the cars drive train and gearing match the compression and cam timing,
for most applications a cam in the 230-240 intake duration at .050 lift and a fairly tight 106-108 LSA with a 9.5:1 -10.5:1 compression will meet the requirements,
generally youll want a dynamic compression near 8:1 and a quench distance in the .038-.044 range


rodcaptocamclearance.JPG

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the cam rotates while indexed by the timing chain at 1/2 crank shaft speed , there are connecting rods designed to provide additional clearance.
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BTW I JUST TOOK THE TIME TO RE_READ THIS THREAD< ITS A VIRTUAL CLASS IN ENGINE ASSEMBLY THAT SHOULD BE READ BY EVERY LAST MEMBER
http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/tbucket-engine-project-dart-shp.3814/
READ THESE THREAD's
and don,t skip the sub linked info


http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/engine-balancing.3900/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/engine-balancing.3900/#post-57940

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/redline.343/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/types-of-crankshaft-steel.204/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...s-to-casting-numbers-and-info.632/#post-53467

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/ballancing-the-components.141/#post-5391
THESE MAY HELP
http://www.airflowresearch.com/super-chevy-nov-2013-195cc-sbc.php

http://www.airflowresearch.com/super-chevy-sep-2013-195cc-sbc.php

http://www.airflowresearch.com/articles/SBC/biggerbetter/big.php

http://airflowresearch.com/articles/article152/A-P1.html

http://airflowresearch.com/articles/article085/A-P1.htm

http://airflowresearch.com/articles/article031/A-P1.htm

http://www.airflowresearch.com/articles/SBC/lt1shootout/lt1shootout.php
 
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grumpyvette

Administrator
Staff member
this is the type of challenge/upgrade I work on for the guys all the time, AND IM CERTAINLY NOT SUGGESTING YOU CAN,T REACH YOUR GOAL,THRU OTHER ROUTES, BUT THAT APPROACHING THE PROBLEM LOGICALLY ITS FAIRLY EASY TO PLAN YOUR GOALS AND COURSE TO ACHIEVE THEM,Ill make some suggestions but you'll make the choices. keep in mind the cam timing, compression ratio, head flow rates,rear gearing and stall speed MUST match
what seems to be over-looked in many engine builds is simply the fact you'll almost always DEEPLY regret jumping into the engine build with both feet and waving your check book as you sink ever deeper into piles of parts receipts and machine shop bills, rather than stepping back with a legal pad, and a calculator and listing in minute detail exactly what you want to accomplish, and taking the time and effort too list and check out in detail what each machine shop procedure costs, why its required and how much each components costs, what your options are and how each component will add too or benefit the completed combo (or in some cases cause you time and grief)
stepping back and thinking things through in detail and listing the cost and potential problems and finding the solutions BEFORE you dive into the process may be a lot less fun, but in the long term its sure to cost less and result in a far better finished project!
yes you'll ALWAYS NEED to verify clearances carefully when assembling any engine and no, you can,t assume everything will fit just because its part of a component list thats suppose to fit correctly, simply because manufacturing is an imprecise process and mistake do get made occasionally!
if you build enough engines youll eventually see a strong relationship, between higher initial cost and that spending a bit more on heads and rotating assembly and valve train components tends to significantly reduce the problems and increase the engines long term durability.


RELATED INFO
http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/block-prep.125/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...k-after-a-cam-lobe-rod-or-bearings-fail.2919/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...g-and-installing-connecting-rods-pistons.247/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...tion-of-crank-durring-short-blk-assembly.852/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/tips-on-building-a-383-sbc-stroker.428/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/stroker-tips-by-len-emanuelson.1249/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/parts-prep-cleaning.6255/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/precision-measuring-tools.1390/#post-52466

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/what-con-rods-would-you-buy.942/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...ng-and-basic-piston-ring-info-youll-need.509/


RELATED VIDEOS






http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3x_67MdgAOM


please post lots of clear , detailed pictures of your progress,, take your time and get the clearances correct and use lots of assembly lube or you may regret rushing thru the process later

READING THRU these links should help
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If your planing on exceeding about 400-430 hp, based on use of a standard production sbc engine casting build-up, and BEFORE you spend a good deal of money in machine work on a stock OEM PRODUCTION block, you might want to know the stock block castings are not ideal, FROM A STRENGTH STAND POINT,yes we all know a dozen guys who swear they built 500 hp sbc combos using a stock block as the basic block,but maintaining 500 hp for a few seconds on a dyno, to verify its peak power level, is not the same as beating on the engine frequently on a near constant basis, in a semi race application, stress is cumulative! what they don,t admit ,or realize is that the the blocks designed for low cost production ,not high performance strength, the main caps have a tendency to flex the cylinder walls don,t remain rigid at near max torque loads and the block was designed to operate at or below 5500rpm at or below 400hp
a bit of reading here might be useful... get out a feeler gauge and look at how thick .060, .090, .120 actually is , and consider how easily a thin section of cylinder wall can flex and crack!

Feeler-Gauge.jpg

viewtopic.php?f=53&t=3897&p=15720&hilit=hone+plate#p15720

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that IDEA that a 215cc-235cc port size is way to large for a 383 is a very common misconception, ] the port size might be perfect or even too restrictive on a 383, a good deal depends on the compression ratio, cam timing and even if nitrous is used, both the intake runners and headers used.
Ive built race 383 sbc engines with 220-230cc heads that kicked butt, its not just about your cylinder head port size , if your looking to maximize the engines power you must match the intended rpm and port flow rats with ALL the components.
a 215cc-235cc port will not be ideal at low rpms with a small duration cam,expected to drive in traffic, but it could be ideal with a good solid roller cam,and a matched single plane intake on a race engine that rarely drops under about 4000 rpm, its all about matching components to the intended application.


a chart FROM THE BOOK,HOW TO BUILD BIG-INCH CHEVY SMALL BLOCKS with some common cross sectional port sizes
(measured at the smallest part of the ports)
...........................sq inches........port cc
edelbrock performer rpm ....1.43.............170
vortec......................1.66.............170
tfs195......................1.93.............195
afr 180.....................1.93.............180
afr 195.....................1.98.............195
afr 210.....................2.05.............210
dart pro 200................2.06.............200
dart pro 215................2.14.............215
brodix track 1 .............2.30.............221
dart pro 1 230..............2.40.............230
edelbrock 23 high port .....2.53.............238
edelbrock 18 deg............2.71.............266
tfs 18 deg..................2.80.............250
GOOD 6" CONNECTING RODS FOR A 383 SBC
http://m.summitracing.com/parts/sca-26000716
http://www.summitracing.com/search/bran ... toview=SKU

http://www.airflowresearch.com/index.php?cPath=24_115

http://www.profilerperformance.com/raci ... -23-degree

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=333

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first question I'm usually asked is WHY build a 383-401, that's simple, you want to use the 350 block that came in the car to save money and make this a simple operation, the 383-401 stokers make excellent power and the increased displacement has advantages,(more total hp and a lower average rpm band) if a 350 makes 1.1 hp per cubic inch you have about 385hp, the same hp ratio in a 383 gives you about 425hp. and usually at about 300-400 rpm lower average rpm, that's easier on the valve train.
the first thing you'll need to get strait in your mind is the realistic budget you'll be willing to work with and that performance is basically the result of the power to weight ratio and HOW effectively you can get the power to the ground. keep in mind that for a street car your NOT building the engine for max peak power, your looking to build for the best average power/tq curve over the rpm range you'll use most.
BTW be sure you either use a stroker oil pan with extra rod clearance or take a ball peen hammer and expand the oil pan rail on your 350 oil pan,too about 1/16" wider, to get the necessary connecting rod clearance or chances are very good the longer stroke 3.75" crank will cause the rods to just touch the 350 oil pan rails giving you a sound like a bad rocker or rod knock, a bit of careful checking and test fitting will easily avoid this.

AND THAT PLANING FOR AND EVENTUALLY HAVING SLIGHTLY MORE HP THAN THE MINIMUM REQUIRED IS SMART, PLANING DURING THE PARTS SOURCING AND ASSEMBLY PROCESS, simply because you won,t always have the ideal tune or traction available,its silly to shoot for minimum levels yet its a waste of money to over build the engine, to levels you'll seldom use or even want, as theres always compromises in drive-ability

ok first Id point out that its silly to build anything smaller than a 383 displacement simply because you'll make significantly greater total power from a larger engine than a smaller one,COSTS for a 383 are just not that much higher than a 350, and its TOTAL POWER not horsepower per cubic inch your interested in!

next,CORRECTLY MATCHING the cylinder heads, cam and compression ratio , to the rpm range where you'll get the best results is where you'll make most of your power potential.

think it thru before buying parts, and only select those components that match your goal,by far the most common mistake is randomly selecting mis-matched parts because you "GOT A DEAL"

ok lets look at your options, to keep costs reasonable we want to use what we can from your current engine but its insane to limit yourself to parts that restrict your potential power levels severely like the current heads,intake and rear gear ratio.


the formula for hp is (tq x rpm/5252=hp
example
450 ft lbs of torque at 3000rpm=257hp
450 ft lbs of torque at 6000rpm=514hp
because the torque is available at that higher RPM RATE and at the higher rpm useing gearing the rotational force the engine supplied can be applied faster or slower to the rear tires

if your smart your not looking to spend a huge amount of cash but you do want a reasonably quick car,
a few calculations will quickly point out that your really looking to have between 375-450 rear wheel hp, that basically translates into an engine making about 18% higher power at the flywheel, so lets assume or goal is a 450-500 hp engine, now your basic 383 will be correctly designed and matched to a rear gear ratio in the 3.73-4.11 rear gear so you'll maximize the area in the torque curve that can give the best results, the 2800-6300rpm band. so that's where we NEED TOO concentrate our efforts. this should point out the stall speed of about 2800-3000rpm is ideal in this application to match your needs
a 383 with its 3.75" stroke and reasonably street-able cam will be using a cam with between ABOUT 225-235 duration at .050 lift with a matching compression ratio in the 10:1-10.5:1 cpr range

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look at this chart, it shows the ideal duration for best results at different rpm bands, well want the MINIMUM DURATION that will supply our needs that's going to be in the 220-230 range for street use,while the 230-235 range would be about ideal for power.but you'll loose street-ability.
we quickly find that duration will match to a 10:1-10.5:1 cpr if we want to use pump gas.
BaseCircleDia.jpg

why do I usually suggest a hydraulic roller cam?
read this

http://www.idavette.net/hib/camcon.htm


ok,now the CYLINDER HEADS and intake NEED to supply that RPM RANGE and DISPLACEMENT, youll want a set of heads that flow about 230cfm AT .500 lift at the MINIMUM and 250-270cfm is FAR better,to easily match that requirement.

http://www.jegs.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/product2_10001_10002_760699_-1

http://airflowresearch.com/eliminator.php

http://www.carcraft.com/techarticles/cc ... index.html

http://www.profilerperformance.com/sbc-heads-176.html

viewtopic.php?f=53&t=8310&p=28891#p28891

http://www.compcams.com/Community/Articles/Details.asp?ID=1737510521

http://store.summitracing.com/partdetail.asp?autofilter=1&part=TFS-32400007&N=700+304524+115&autoview=sku


those heads and that compression ratio, and cams Ill suggest will match the 3000rpm stall speed but youll need a 3.54:1-3.73:1 rear gear ratio to match.

cams like this

http://www.cranecams.com/?show=browseParts&action=partSpec&partNumber=119661&lvl=2&prt=5

heres the SMALL BASE CAM I USE IN MY 383
NOTICE it has a .900 base circle

a small base circle gives more clearance because your cam lobe lift is the differance between the base circle and the lobe nose, lets assume a .500 lift on a chevy sb
they normally use a 1.5 ratio rocker so the cam lobe needs to be .3334 tall , so with a standard base circle the lobe nose swings in a circle that's about 1.766 in diam.
(
a small base circle cam like my crane with its .900 dia. with the same lobe would only spin in a circle thats about 1.568 in diam. giving about 0.100 inches MORE CLEARANCE TO THE POTENTIAL ROD/CAM CONTACT AREA
notice how the rod bolts come close to the cam bearings and cam lobes,as the pistons reach top dead canter in the bores, this clearance must be individually checked and should be no less than about .060 (generally you cam use a LARGE plastic tie-wrap
https://www.amazon.com/BuyCableTies...D=41U9CtmwOuL&preST=_SY300_QL70_&dpSrc=detail
12cal.jpg

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placed between the cam lobe and connecting rod bolts or connecting rod shoulder areas to check clearances as the soft tie-wrap will not damage the cam lobe while you verify clearances)you must install the timing set and index the cam correctly to get a valid clearance , as the cam lobes rotate and at some point they can be incorrectly indexed too hit the rods, while they would not if correctly timed.

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why you need to verify the cam to rod bolt clearance
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rod-grinding.jpe

on some stroker applications SOME rods need to have the bolts ground for cam lobe clearance

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http://www.cranecams.com/?show=browseParts&action=partSpec&partNumber=119661&lvl=2&prt=5

this makes slightly better PEAK power, but was less street-able

http://www.crower.com/misc/cam_spec/cam_finder.php?part_num=00471&x=20&y=9

stroker kits

http://www.speedomotive.com/ps-522-85-383cid-mighty-mouse-budget-all-forged-stroker-kit.aspx

http://www.speedomotive.com/ps-525-85-391cid-all-forged-stroker-kit.aspx

installing a longer 3.75 stroke crank assembly
Ive built dozens of 383 and 396 sbc engines and the clearance can be done BY YOUR OWN HANDS with a standard HAND HELD drill and a few CARBIDE BURRS OR GRIND STONES in that drill in well under two hours if you take your time and total expense even if you need to buy that drill and burrs will be well under $50 total

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when building a 383 stroker ,you need to check rod to cam and rod to block clearances, you should have not problem grinding .080 or so clearance on the lower bore wall edge with zero chance of getting into the water jacket passages or water jacket at the area of the yellow paint indicated in that picture, most people forget to check that area
obviously youll want to check all 8 cylinders and remove the cam and clean carefully before re-installing the cam.

place you old bearings in the block an place the crank in those bearings after coating them with axle grease
slowly rotate the crank and grind a minimum of .060 clearance anywhere the counter weights might touch the block and try NOT to grind more than about .070 any place it touches the block (use a JUMBO size paper clip as a gauge if you don,t have feeler gauges)
next assemble two connecting rods and pistons, one connecting rod and piston for the left one connecting rod and piston for the right, use old bearings coated with axle grease and no rings on the pistons, assemble them to the crank and grind anyplace the rods touch the block, grind minimum of .060 clearance and try NOT to grind more than about .070 any place the rods touche the block (use a LARGE size paper clip as a gauge if you don,t have feeler gauges)move them to the next journal and repeat until all 4 journals and 8 connecting rods clear. now assemble all eight rods and pistons without rings and install them in their correct locations and recheck everything carefully.
next install the cam and index it correctly with the timing chain/gears, rotate the engine slowly and look for clearance issues, between the cam and rods/rod bolts ,you'll need to use a small base cam if there are major clearance issues but in most cases if your cams lift and duration is under about 230 at .05 and .500 lift there should be minor if any clearance issues, usually the outside edge of a rod bolt head is the only area needing a touch up.

once everything clears, wash all the parts VERY CAREFULLY ,TWICE and re-oil then send out to be balanced now you might ask why do that! well, first youll know its done correctly, and that a correctly built 383 will have a very significant hp and torque advantage over any similar 327 or 350

how much power I'll get.

that of course depends on the combo, cpr, cam,ETC. but you can assume about a 40hp/40 ft lbs increase over a similarly built 350

some of the major factors in your engines potential power, is the volumetric efficiency (how efficiently you fill and empty the cylinders) and the octane of the fuel used, compression ratio and detonation limits,
With detonation, prevention the main factors are
Ignition timing
Quench
FUEL OCTANE
DCR
and cylinder heat level
you�ll be fairly safe if you stay under
8.5:1 dcr at 170f degrees
8.25 dcr at 180f degrees
7.8:1 dcr at 210f degrees
and keep the quench in the .036-.043 range
need a few pictures?
this may help
the common areas are the area near the block oil pan rail where the rod bolts touch
and the lower inner cylinder walls and where the cam lobes touch the rod bolts upper shoulder on some types of rods, now you can,t grind on the cam, but you can grind the edge of the rod bolt and you can use a small base circle cam to give greater clearances
AND yes it very common for the stroker crank, counter weights or connecting rods in a 383-400 to touch a 350 oil pan, and make a ticking or knocking sound, if you don,t clearance it a bit more, with a ball peen hammer on the oil pan rail area, Id also check the dip stick as some touch the rotating assembly
for obvious interference, youll need to check this, it can be made to clear rather easily but it must be checked and properly fitted/clearanced
naturally youll measure the bearing journals
Picture106.jpg

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QUENCH??
http://www.100megsfree4.com/dictionary/car-dicq.htm
lobeclear.jpg

this is what Ive seen posted frequently
BaseCircleDia.jpg


block-clearance.jpg

why you need to verify the cam to rod bolt clearance
removing the rod caps during clearance checks while building your 383 ,does seem to allow you to see the clearance issues a bit easier

rodcaptocamclearance.JPG

rodcaptoblockclearance.JPG


rod-grinding.jpe

on some stroker applications SOME rods need to have the bolts ground for cam lobe clearance

Ive seen , cylinders number 1,2,5,6 as the most common for contacting cam lobes, posted frequently, but Ive always just checked each rod separately without the rings installed as I test fit the components, Ive usually used a semi straitened, extra large paper clip that measures about .055 as a feeler gauge in the past but currently use a extra long cable tie as its far less likely to scratch a cam lobe and its flexible and easy to use and if it gets pinched between the two theres no potential damage done and a really strong light so I could see half way decent
image_16331.jpg

one of those LED flash lights helps to get light into some areas
image_16738.jpg

quench area:
A zone in the combustion chamber where the piston at top dead center is very close to the cylinder head. Because the piston and cylinder head is cooler than the unburned part of the fuel-air mixture (i.e., end gas), they pull the heat from the end gas. Because the end gas is now cooler, detonation is quenched or reduced. However, the process does form unburned hydrocarbons.

SQUISH
An area in the combustion chamber of some engines where the piston squishes or squeezes part of the fuel-air mixture at the end of the compression stroke. As the piston approaches top dead center, the mixture is pushed out of the squish area and this promotes turbulence, further mixing of the fuel-air mixture and more efficient combustion

run less than about .035 thousands and at high rpm levels the pistons might hit the cylinder heads, run more than about .044 thousands the QUENCH effect of forcing the fuel air mix to the center of the cylinder from the cylinders edge area looses both speed and effectiveness, remember the quench area must be so tight that virtually all the fuel/air mix is forced (squished) into the center area and none is allowed to burn until its squirted into the burn area increasing turbulence and burn efficiency
in theory the much better quench, combined with the shorter more compact area the flame front needs to cover and the far higher turbulence combine to allow more of the pressure to build AFTER the crank passes TDC on the end of compression and beginning of the power stroke

its mostly an advantage in that you get a more even and FASTER burn in the cylinder and less chance of detonation, simply because both the lower time and faster pressure curves favor the ignition flame front vs detonation
look, it takes approximately 40 thousands of a second for the flame from the ignition to cross a 4.25" bore,at low rpms and still takes about 15 milliseconds at high RPM due to the much faster movement of the compressed fuel air mix in the cylinders, lets look at what that means
if the Chevy plug is located 4/5ths of the way to one side that's a time of about 32 thousands for the pressure to build as the flame travels 3.4" in the Chevy but in a compact combustion chamber it could only take the cylinder flame front less than 10-20 thousands of a second to travel across ed the combustion chamber for a complete burn at low rpms, this of course speeds up as the swirl and turbulence increase with increased engine RPMs but the ratios stay similar. this results in more usable energy WORKING on the piston AFTER IT PASSES TOP DEAD CENTER ON THE POWER STROKE. BUT MODERN WEDGE combustion chambers use increased QUENCH to speed the flame front and lower the burn time combined with a smaller combustion chambers.
the difference may be easier to grasp if you think of the quench area as a significant part of the total combustion chamber volume,that's forcing its potential fuel/air mix into the central combustion chamber as a jet of highly compressed F/A mix, like the difference between lighting a cup of gasoline by simply placing it next to a camp fire vs throwing it violently into a camp fire

remember to get the quench clearance between the head and piston in the .038-.044 range
headgasket.jpg

the answer too what cooling system is most likely to both cool the car/truck efficiently and fit your budget,would mostly depend on your budget limitations,
but a large 3-4 tube aluminum radiator with a a 140-to-200 amp alternator

https://www.dbelectrical.com/produc...0-5-7l-7-4l-chevy-truck-93-94-95-200-amp.html

https://www.summitracing.com/parts/tff-8173nep/applications/year/1996

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/building-a-custom-wet-sump-oil-pan.65/
taking advantage of all your options is a smart way to reproach the issue of correctly controlling, and maintaining a stable and predictable engine heat level, thus installing a larger capacity racing style oil pan and an auxiliary oil cooler with an electrical fan, will significantly increase the engines ability to rapidly dissipate heat even before that engine heat is absorbed by the engines cooling systems coolant. oil flow over a few of the hottest components like valve springs, bearing surfaces,and rocker arms absorb and transfer heat to the block, and oil pan as it flows, thus a larger oil capacity and a baffled oil pan with an extended sump is a good idea as the increased oil capacity and larger surface area of an enlarged sump area exposed too outside air flow can stabilize and allow a good deal of heat to dissipate to that outside air flow, as the air which can be well over 130F-170 plus F cooler that the engine oil that can be up to 250F plus in a racing engine
impan1.jpg


impan2.jpg


impan3.jpg

1024x1024.jpg

flx-365.jpg

tube2.jpg

I'd point out that a 7-8 quart baffled oil pan helps cool an engine.
and dual or a large single electric fan with a matched ducted shroud and the ability to move,
2500 fcm-3000 cfm of air should provide adequate cooling for most engines.
adding an auxiliary oil cooler certainly helps
flx-45901_w.jpg

Keep in mind a well designed 7-8 quart baffled oil pan adds both durability and helps reduce cooling issues
baffle1.jpg

and if you have an automatic transmission Id add a electrical fan cooled trans fluid cooler
autotransf1.jpg

RELATED INFO
http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...lternators-and-oil-all-here.12628/#post-69303

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...sion-and-oil-cooler-increases-durability.176/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/oil-system-mods-that-help.2187/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...-choose-an-electric-fan-in-4-easy-steps.7774/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...tting-out-low-voltage.12221/page-2#post-59599

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...uys-don-t-look-at-the-clues.11176/#post-50125

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/aluminum-radiator-sources.755/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...ing-system-flow-rates-and-heat-transfer.9880/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/copper-vs-aluminum-in-radiators.4230/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/setting-up-electric-fans-correctly.7150/
all these threads add useful info on your parts selection

viewtopic.php?f=55&t=109

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=5078

viewtopic.php?f=55&t=1115

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=196

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=90

viewtopic.php?f=70&t=2798

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=2630&p=13145#p13145

viewtopic.php?f=57&t=4974&p=15425&hilit=vacuum+gauge#p15425

viewtopic.php?f=70&t=4683

viewtopic.php?f=53&t=726&p=2302#p2302

viewtopic.php?f=50&t=428&p=22216&hilit=stroker+tips#p22216

viewtopic.php?f=53&t=253&p=2124&hilit=alloy+2618#p2124

viewtopic.php?f=53&t=110&hilit=alloy+2618

viewtopic.php?f=53&t=204

viewtopic.php?f=53&t=510

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=5078&p=14433&hilit=stroker+tips#p14433

viewtopic.php?f=50&t=1249&p=7598&hilit=stroker+tips#p7598

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...ut-building-a-283-305-or-307-this-may-be.427/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/replacing-a-gen1-rear-main-seal.474/#post-585

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/semi-fool-proof-cam-sellection.82/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...ting-started-in-the-car-hobby.339/#post-52906

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/bare-minimum-tools.11026/#post-51823

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...-calculators-and-basic-math.10705/#post-46737

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...k-for-in-a-good-engine-combo.9930/#post-38324
 
Last edited by a moderator:

grumpyvette

Administrator
Staff member
ok just a bit of info, if your looking for what we did years ago, when we were limited to ported fuelie and turbo heads

when we used to build 302 z28 engines in the past for street use we tried to build 11:1 cpr motors for the street, (we also built alot of .030 over size 327 engines)and the most effective cam we found after testing dozens back in those days
were these two, in the camaros and a few vega engine swaps
for a manual transmission and a 4.11-4.56:1 rear gear this was frequently used with good results, but we also ran edelbrock SY1 or cross ram dual quad intakes were the crane solid lifter flat tappet cams 114681 and the similar 110921
they were markedly more effective than either of the two off road z28 cams #3927140 or #3965724
in those days no one serious ran hydraulic cams, you would be laughed off the track, solid flat tappet lifters were your only real choice if you expected to buzz 7000rpm plus
http://www.amazon.com/SEPTLS06970819-Lo ... 493&sr=1-5
elgauge.jpg

a few years later we found that those same two cams gave excellent results in a 10.5;1 cpr 383 with a 3.73:1-4.11:1 rear gear and were even better once the aftermarket supplied the dart and brownfield heads, later
as you read through most of the builds listed and discussed on this web site,
youll eventually see a strong trend, towards what I and many other knowledgeable engine builders have been forced over time into recognizing.
the trend is simply that only engines built for max long term durability and max torque in the useful rpm range are making any financial sense.
as Ive stated many times, you have to finish a race to win it! and your never going to build a client base ,
if the engines you build make killer power on a dyno but need rebuilding in a couple months time.
theres several threads on builds here on this web site, and a great deal of time and research is devoted to extended durability, cooling and lubrication ,
and carefully selecting components, and machine work done, designed for max strength, for the dollars spent!
I used to ask guys
"would you prefer to build an engine that if you keep it well tuned and change the oil regularly,
will most likely still be running in 10-12 years, without changing major components, or
would you rather have an additional 25-30 hp,and need a rebuild every 3-6 years,
but have a much better chance it won,t last half that time span....
especially in a muscle car driven on the street,
where either engine choice will destroy street tires effortlessly,
and get you a ticket effortlessly for speeding any time you get stupid?"


http://www.cranecams.com/index.php?show=browseParts&action=partSpec&partNumber=110921&lvl=2&prt=5

http://www.cranecams.com/index.php?show=browseParts&action=partSpec&partNumber=114681&lvl=2&prt=5

the 114681 had better street manors but it gave up a tiny bit of power

heads like this would have been great back in the 70s and 80s
http://www.profilerperformance.com/sbc-heads-176.html

but keep in mind sunoco 260 high octane gas was 39 cents a gallon and available almost everyplace, if you knew where the sunoco stations were.


IF your installing a longer stroke crank in a SBC, the first step is test fitting and carefully marking the connecting rods and block after carefully checking which rods need clearance, in most cases only two or four cylinders will require cam/rod clearance work, and the amount that is normally required too be removed is small enough that the difference in weight is so minimal it won,t have any significance in the engine balance, so grind the rod only in the potential area of cam to rod interference, only on one side, just at that one location, try hard to allow a .060 rod/cam clearance and no more, and do it in a shallow rounded depression so you don,t create stress risers, with any and all the grind mark lines only parallel to the rods long axis and then polish, the grind marks until the areas smooth with 500 grit sand paper, then clean carefully to remove metallic dust
on many blocks all the block rails will need minor clearance work for the rods to clear the oil pan rails, and don,t forget to verify the counter weight to lower cylinder clearance,
p140810_image_large.jpg


keep in mind the problem is easy to totally avoid simply by selecting rods designed for stroker engines,EXAMPLE
SCAT and LUNATI both make 7/16" rod bolt rods with far stronger than stock forgings, that have cap screw rods designed for much greater clearance

DEAL IN PROVEN FACTS NEVER GUESS , NEVER ASSUME
first step.

before you start panicking and potentially wasting money and time.
would be to assemble a single piston and rod assembly without rings,
but ideally with some old bearings on the crank and connecting rod and install the cam, in the block
( indexed with a simple,dot to dot timing on the timing gear sets should be ok at this point)
move that connecting rod and piston to all 8 locations and very carefully verify clearances (remember the rod clearance bevel faces the crank counter weight and the piston valve clearances face the outer block)through the full 720 degree rotational cycle, remember the cam spins at 1/2 the crank speed so the cam lobe comes close to the rod every other rotation,
and actually verify you DO, have or DON,T have a potential clearance problem
theres zero sense in runninbg around pulling your hair out and screaming until,
theres actually a PROVEN ISSUE too SOLVE (THERE MAY NOT BE!)
now if you find theres an issue to be solved you proceed using facts
and while your checking the cam lobe to connecting rod clearance check the connecting rod to block clearance ....yes the same minimum .060-.080 clearance is suggested
lobeclear.jpg

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...earances-and-journal-surface.9955/#post-38385

generally its a minor easily done clearance job
camlcc1.jpg

camlcc3.jpg

camlcc4.jpg

camlcc5.jpg

camlcc6.jpg

camlcc7.jpg

http://www.scatcrankshafts.com/index.htm
don,t forget to verify the cam to connecting rod clearances
a cams VALVE LIFT is determined by the DISTANCE the lifter moves as the cam rotates under the lifter base as it moves from the cam lobe base circle
(the closest the lifter comes to the cams center line)
up to the cam lobes ramp to the lobes peak,
(the furthest the lifter up off or from the cams center line)

don,t forget to carefully check the piston skirt to crank counter weight clearance, it should be a MINIMUM of .080 thousands

heres some pictures taken of an engine assembly that use a crank designed for a MINIMUM of a 6.25" connecting rod that was used with a 6.135" connecting rod

p140811.jpg

piston1.jpg

you can clearly see where the piston pin boss was being hit bye the counter weights, even though the builder checked one piston and found it had .025 clearance during assembly
pistontocrankclearance.jpg


the result was a trashed engine with lots of damage

piston2.jpg

theres a great deal of useful info in the links so read and take advantage of it

http://www.carcraft.com/techarticles/cc ... roker.html

http://www.chevymania.com/tech/383.htm

http://www.hotrod.com/howto/69883_strok ... index.html

http://www.circletrack.com/tipstricks/4 ... index.html

viewtopic.php?f=53&t=3449

viewtopic.php?f=69&t=2145

viewtopic.php?f=44&t=700&p=973#p973

viewtopic.php?f=69&t=1598

viewtopic.php?f=53&t=247&p=7387#p7387

viewtopic.php?f=50&t=1249&p=3752&hilit=burr#p3752

viewtopic.php?f=50&t=804&p=1168&hilit=+burr#p1168

viewtopic.php?f=7&t=2834&p=7327#p7327

both these pictures show a rod that was probably over or excessively ground & clearanced for most engines, careful rechecking as you rough grind,the rod, helps, take off as little material as you can to get the required clearance.
IMG_0895.jpg

IMG_0894.jpg


don,t forget to verify these areas also

p140811_image_large.jpg

p140806_image_large.jpg


read thru these related threads, posted below, youll find a good deal of info, on installing pistons and rings.

viewtopic.php?f=53&t=509&p=12277&hilit=gapping+rings#p12277

viewtopic.php?f=53&t=5454

viewtopic.php?f=53&t=4630

viewtopic.php?f=53&t=2795

viewtopic.php?f=53&t=2837

viewtopic.php?f=53&t=852

viewtopic.php?f=53&t=3897

viewtopic.php?f=51&t=588&p=869&hilit=hone+plate#p869
http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...ting-started-in-the-car-hobby.339/#post-21733


http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/block-prep.125/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...k-after-a-cam-lobe-rod-or-bearings-fail.2919/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/engine-assembly-check-list.111/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/finding-a-machine-shop.321/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/bare-minimum-tools.11026/#post-51823

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...k-for-in-a-good-engine-combo.9930/#post-38324

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...ing-parts-and-a-logical-plan.7722/#post-26314

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/oil-system-mods-that-help.2187/#post-5890

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...-calculators-and-basic-math.10705/#post-46737



http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...c-piston-ring-info-youll-need.509/#post-39781

you can frequently gain the required clearance for use of a stroker crank , on the stock oil pan, with a few well placed additional dents in the oil pan rail areas with a 3 lb ball peen hammer but the correct route is to buy a baffled oil pan and windage tray with the clearance built in.
when buying a corvette oil pan ground clearance is tight, a baffled 7"-7.5" deep oil pan thats designed for YOUR block that holds 7 quarts is generally the best choice youll need to know which side the dip sticks on and the gaskets thickness used so as questions before ordering to insure you get the correct oil pan for your application
reading through these links, and sub links will be useful

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...pans-that-fit-the-c4-corvette.3071/#post-8131

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Chevy-Small...ash=item5888ff955f:g:mm4AAOSwDN1USU-o&vxp=mtr

http://forum.grumpysperformance.com/viewtopic.php?f=54&t=206&p=390&hilit=+seal+thick+pan#p390

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...s-on-building-a-383-sbc-stroker.428/#post-524

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/oil-system-mods-that-help.2187/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/building-a-custom-wet-sump-oil-pan.65/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/whats-a-windage-tray-do.64/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...alling-connecting-rods-pistons.247/#post-1745

as you do more engines youll get experience and the process becomes easier, almost second nature as they say.
an AIR DIE GRINDER and a carbide burr and cut off wheels make the process fast and easier than electric drills

viewtopic.php?f=27&t=1831

viewtopic.php?f=50&t=1266

keep in mind cap screw rods (bolts screw into the upper rod from cap)
generally require less block clearance work,and in some designs can have much more cam-to-rod clearance and are usually stronger than O.E.M. rods


sca-25700_w.jpg


Scat3-ICR2-ICR.jpg

you may or may not have SCAT provide an internally balanced, 383 sbc ,
I would certainly suggest , 6" connecting rods with 7/16" ARP rod bolts,
but thats not mandatory
but Id suggest you buy the flywheel and damper separately as you have more control on the QUALITY of the components,
a billet flywheel is a huge step up in strength over a cast OEM flywheel.
http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/selecting-a-flywheel.1042/#post-1969

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...e-a-clutch-in-a-c3-corvette.15034/#post-85152

and of course, by now you might realize I post related info for the hundreds of members,
that may read through the thread in months or years yet to come
read through all links and sub-links
be aware that a 168 tooth flywheel will not fit in every bell housing design,
but it allows a much better choice in clutches and in many cases better quality clutches.
always ask questions before spending cash
http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/harmonic-balancer.3554/#post-53706

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/168-or-153-flywheels.3951/#post-67681

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...pes-of-crankshaft-steel.204/page-2#post-46231

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...ing-rod-strength-h-vs-i-beam.1168/#post-40253

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...nk-durring-short-blk-assembly.852/#post-39417


http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/what-damper-flywheel.6026/#post-21582

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/selecting-a-flywheel.1042/#post-1969

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/don-t-beat-that-damper.83/#post-14101

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/damper-honing.4975/#post-13912

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/damper-tool.223/#post-8024

https://www.dieselarmy.com/engine-tech/engine/how-it-works-viscous-dampers-a-k-a-harmonic-balancers/

https://www.dragzine.com/tech-stori...ers-are-crucial-to-the-health-of-your-engine/

http://www.laskeyracing.com/shop/harmonics.htm

https://fluidampr.com/how-a-fluidampr-works/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...r-seal-crank-in-1-piece-block.301/#post-31934

http://www.dieseltechmag.com/2009/02/dt-tested-fluidampr-performance-damper

https://motoiq.com/project-golf-r-mkvii-fluidampr-test/3/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/cheap-damper-ballancer-source.279/#post-1673
a few tool related threads with sub links

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/what-hand-tools-to-buy.4069/#post-10827

http://www.superchevy.com/how-to/en...-build-a-383-small-block-engine-sledgehammer/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/what-tools-are-important.39/#post-47

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/precision-measuring-tools.1390/#post-52469

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/finding-a-machine-shop.321/#post-55314

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/bare-minimum-tools.11026/#post-51823

http://www.hotrod.com/how-to/engine/ccrp-0808-383-stroker-small-block-chevy/

http://www.hotrod.com/how-to/engine/hrdp-0503-chevy-383-engine/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/cam-degreeing.9010/#post-35474

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...all-tools-install-info.1479/page-2#post-35245

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...et-it-to-last-cam-install-info.90/#post-57942

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/porting-can-help.462/

http://www.powerblocktv.com/episode/HP2013-05/summit-racing-383-stroker-pt-1

http://www.powerblocktv.com/episode/HP2013-06/summit-racing-383-stroker-pt-2
http://www.chevrolet.com/performance/crate-engines.html

http://www.hotrod.com/articles/hrdp-0503-chevy-383-engine/

http://www.superchevy.com/how-to/en...-build-a-383-small-block-engine-sledgehammer/

http://www.superchevy.com/how-to/project-cars/sucp-0706-small-block-chevy-stroker-kit/

http://www.chevyhardcore.com/tech-stories/engine/building-the-little-383-small-block-that-could/

http://www.hotrod.com/articles/ccrp-0808-383-stroker-small-block-chevy/




 
Last edited by a moderator:

grumpyvette

Administrator
Staff member
your basic 383 short block can be built on a tight budget, but read thru these links,and sub links for info and tips

http://www.northernautoparts.com/part/ek-ek1097alb

http://www.superchevy.com/technical/eng ... index.html

http://speedomotive.com/ps-523-85-383ci ... t-kit.aspx

http://www.popularhotrodding.com/tech/0 ... index.html

viewtopic.php?f=69&t=519&p=644#p644

viewtopic.php?f=44&t=3097&p=8240#p8240

viewtopic.php?f=69&t=1598

viewtopic.php?f=53&t=2733

viewtopic.php?f=69&t=2145

viewtopic.php?f=69&t=629

viewtopic.php?f=44&t=703


one of the more important design factors is getting the lubrication system design correctly built or installed
http://www.midwestmotorsportsinc.com/in ... 2&parent=0

http://www.moroso.com/catalog/categoryd ... code=11330

http://www.milodon.com/oil-pans/road-race-oil-pans.asp

http://www.midwestmotorsportsinc.com/in ... 1&parent=0

http://www.midwestmotorsportsinc.com/in ... 2&parent=0

http://www.summitracing.com/parts/CTR-15-260/

viewtopic.php?f=54&t=65


I think the hamburger oil pan is a better value At $242 than most of the common mid priced oil pans
notice the better oil control features

https://www.summitracing.com/parts/ham-1088/overview/
ham-1088.jpg




http://www.milodon.com/oil-pans/street-oil-pans-sbchevy.asp

http://www.jegs.com/p/Moroso/Moroso-Street-Strip-Oil-Pans/763991/10002/-1

https://www.summitracing.com/search/brand/hamburgers-performance/part-type/oil-pans

https://www.cantonracingproducts.com/cgi-bin/commerce.cgi?search=action&category=1301

http://www.stefsperformance.net/ste...oil-pans/aluminum-oil-pans-pumps#!prettyPhoto




If I was buying a new oil pan,I would have probable gone with an oil pan design similar to these, after carefully verifying which design fits the application, if I had access to an old pan ID have taken very careful measurements and fabricated, a custom oil pan , but then Im on a strict budget and I do own a couple welders, and having done that, in the past and made patterns from poster board and duct tape I know its a bit time intensive but not very expensive.
but ID rather spend the day buying and welding sheet metal,perforated steel and fabricating a 7-8 quart oil pan than buying or using a stock 5 qt oil pan, on a high performance application
 
Last edited by a moderator:

grumpyvette

Administrator
Staff member
a few sources for a sbc if your not into building from the block up

(CRANE CAMS USED TO SUPPLY MANY G.M.PERFORMANCE CAMS,
Chevrolet Performance LT4 Hot Cam Hydraulic Roller Camshafts 24502586

this is no longer true and QUALITY has dropped off noticeably by who ever is currently supplying the cams)

http://www.jegs.com/p/Blueprint-Engines ... 6/10002/-1

http://www.dougherbert.com/383chevrolet ... 14_615_748

http://ohiocrank.com/chev_sb_shortb.html

http://www.dartheads.com/products/shp-s ... locks.html

http://www.summitracing.com/parts/NAL-10067353/

http://www.summitracing.com/parts/MLL-BP3830CTC1/

http://www.summitracing.com/parts/EDL-46213/

each combo of displacement,intended rpm power band, compression ratio,head flow rates,induction, port cross section, etc will have a limited range of nearly ideal cam timing
there are calculations that can be used to get you right in the ideal ball park

youll want to take the time to do the math and compare components, lets for a second assume your,debating these two heads,
if you compare the 195cc vs 210cc AFR heads, all the way
theres a significant improvement in flow and a negligible decrease in port flow speed
theres always a compromise made between cost and potential power,
and obviously you want to match components to the intended power and rpm range,
but having seen a bunch of 383 builds use both AFR heads,
I think the 210cc choice here, is a no brainer if you can afford the price.


heres a chart FROM THE BOOK,HOW TO BUILD BIG-INCH CHEVY SMALL BLOCKS with some common cross sectional port sizes
(measured at the smallest part of the ports)

HeadsVsPortFlow.JPG


Potential HP based on Airflow (Hot Rod, Jun '99, p74):
Airflow at 28" of water x 0.257 x number of cylinders = potential HP
or required airflow based on HP:
HP / 0.257 / cylinders = required airflow

if we compare the head air flow rates between a 195cc and 210cc head on a 383-406 SBC and assuming a decent roller cam with the lift and duration,required, and intake that allows the heads to flow at their full potential,
195cc Street Head Flow Chart
.200 .300 .400 .500 .550
Int 146 201 247 275 280
Exh 119 166 197 213 218


https://spicerparts.com/calculators/engine-displacement-calculator
210cc Race Ready Head Flow Chart
.200 .300 .400 .500 .550 .600 .650
Int 145 199 255 292 301 309 311
Exh 110 158 192 210 214 220 222


if you compare peak intake rated flow at .550 lift
280 cfm vs 301 cfm (about a 9% increase) youll see why
thats in theory potentially a 43 hp gain


http://www.wallaceracing.com/chokepoint.php

http://www.wallaceracing.com/chokepoint-rpm.php

http://www.wallaceracing.com/dynamic-cr.php

http://www.kb-silvolite.com/calc.php?action=comp2

http://www.wallaceracing.com/lpv.php

http://www.wallaceracing.com/dynamic-cr.php

http://www.compcams.com/Camquest/default.asp

http://www.auto-ware.com/software/eap/eap.htm

http://www.chevyhiperformance.com/tech/ ... ewall.html

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=1070

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=82

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=480

the most valuable tool you can acquire is as broad a selection of valid information, on exactly how and why things work in your car,s engine, drive train , and suspension , as a reference base to work from, and acquiring a good set of testing and measuring tools to verify and test with
you really should get these books and read them before going any further, it will help a good deal


http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/A...5079777/sr=2-1/ref=sr_2_1/102-1234339-0571324

1557882169.01._PE30_PIdp-schmooS,TopRight,7,-26_SCMZZZZZZZ_.jpg

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/t...gy_img_2/102-1234339-0571324?v=glance&s=books

0912656042.01._PE30_PIdp-schmooS,TopRight,7,-26_SCMZZZZZZZ_.jpg


http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/t...gy_img_2/102-1234339-0571324?v=glance&s=books

0895861755.01._PE30_PIdp-schmooS,TopRight,7,-26_SCMZZZZZZZ_.jpg

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/t..._books_1/102-1234339-0571324?v=glance&s=books

1884089208.01._PE30_PIdp-schmoo2,TopRight,7,-26_SCMZZZZZZZ_.jpg

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/t..._books_3/102-1234339-0571324?v=glance&s=books
1557883572.01._PE30_PIdp-schmoo2,TopRight,7,-26_SCMZZZZZZZ_.jpg

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/t...f=sr_1_2/102-1234339-0571324?v=glance&s=books
0760302030.01._PE_PIdp-schmoo2,TopRight,7,-26_SCMZZZZZZZ_.jpg


INVESTING THE TIME AND EFFORT IN PURCHASING AND READING A FEW BOOKS WILL BE VERY COST EFFECTIVE
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http://www.dragzine.com/tech-stories/en ... ine-block/
"

SMALL BLOCK REFERENCE BOOKS YOULL WANT
start by buying these books and watching the video

http://www.themotorbookstore.com/resmchstvi.html
chevystep.jpg


maxperf.jpg

http://www.amazon.com/David-Vizards...8&qid=1456194032&sr=8-5&keywords=DAVID+VIZARD
HOW TO BUILD MAX PERFORMANCE CHEVY SMALL BLOCKS ON A BUDGET by DAVID VIZARD
.
johnl.jpg

JOHN LINGENFELTER on modifying small-block chevy engines
http://www.amazon.com/Lingenfelter-...=1456193940&sr=8-1&keywords=JOHN+LINGENFELTER

smokeyy.jpg

http://www.amazon.com/Smokey-Yunick...2&sr=8-1&keywords=smokey+yunick+power+secrets


jenkinsrace.jpg


heres two well thought through engine builds, and several related links
they will take a while to read through the links and sub-links
[color:red]but[/color]
if you take the time and effort to read all the LINKS and SUB LINKS YOULL LEARN A GOOD DEAL

BUILD THREADS

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/tbucket-engine-project-dart-shp.3814/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/renegade-intake-for-cross-fires.2796/



if your willing to use an old school flat tappet solid lifter cam,
Id suggest a crane 110921 flat tappet solid lifter design,
obviously you can't reasonably select the right cam for any application,
without matching its intended valve timing to the application,
and other components to be used.

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/semi-fool-proof-cam-sellection.82/

a cam like this will come very close to maximizing the port flow on a fuelie head,
on a properly designed combo in a 327-400 sbc,
but its not ideal for a daily driver style cars engine application,
as its designed to operate in the 3500 rpm-about-6800 rpm power band,
in a engine with properly matched drive train ,
and other engine components,
clearances and valve train.
http://www.cranecams.com/product/cart.php?m=product_detail&p=23968
https://www.summitracing.com/parts/crn-110921

crane110921.jpg

that was a very well respected cam , used in the 1970s-90s
it made very respectable power,
its best with 10.5:1-11:1 compression and a dual plane intake like an edelbrock air gap,
and headers with a low restriction exhaust,
get the static compression down at 10:1 and degree the cam in strait up, you should get by with that 98 octane fuel.
and you'll want a manual trans or a 3200 stall converter and a 3.73:1 -4.11:1 gear,
most guys used a holley 750-780 cfm carb.
with 1.6:1 roller rockers and decent long tube open headers
,it' valve timing about maximized the power OEM, Chevy fuelie heads had available in most sbc engines

before you ask.
yes theres a similar version in a hydraulic flat tappet version, you get easy valve adjustment but it costs you a couple hundred rpm in peak power, and neither versions going to be ideal on anything but a serious performance car with the correct matched valve train, intake,headers,gearing etc., remember this class of cams is designed for road racing and drag, racing and serious performance with matched tires, suspension , gearing etc where youll rarely have the engine spinning under 3500 rpm
crane110741.png

USEFUL RELATED LINKED INFO

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/what-to-look-for-in-a-good-engine-combo.9930/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...le-that-don-t-use-resources.12125/#post-58374

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/383-information-overload.11137/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/bjautos-383-build-pictures.9483/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/tips-on-building-a-383-sbc-stroker.428/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/stroker-tips-by-len-emanuelson.1249/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...ty-thats-key-in-building-a-good-engine.11682/


http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...e-springs-and-setting-up-the-valve-train.181/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...ng-cam-and-shifting-the-lca.10553/#post-44949

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...lding-a-350-or-upgrading-too-a-383-sbc.11408/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...ectly-and-get-it-to-last-cam-install-info.90/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...ing-a-383-sbc-combo-planing.12168/#post-58778

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/valve-train-clearances-and-problems.528/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/a-383-build.10991/#post-48513

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...ild-a-350-or-a-383-sbc-combo.8310/#post-28891

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/small-base-circle-cams.3810/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/bits-of-383-info.38/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...cs-of-starting-a-383-sbc-combo-planing.12168/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/tweaking-a-350-383.13087/
 
Last edited by a moderator:

grumpyvette

Administrator
Staff member
http://www.scatcrankshafts.com/

BUILDING A 383 and want a decent FORGED bottom end
IF YOU HAVE A ONE PIECE REAR SEAL BLOCK AND WANT TO USE 6" RODS SCAT LISTS THESE

4-350-3800-6000-L 435065L 350 1-PC REAR SEAL, STD WEIGHT 3.800" 6.000" 2.100" 52
4-350-3875-6000-L 435070L 350 1-PC REAR SEAL, STD WEIGHT 3.875" 6.000" 2.100" 52

they do list these cranks

and these rotating assembly's

CHEVY 350 SMALL-BLOCK 1-PC REAR SEAL 350 MAIN, 4340 FORGED CRANK, I-BEAM OR H-BEAM RODS WITH 7/16" CAP SCREWS

383 4-350-3750-5700-L 2-ICR5700-7/16 FORGED 4.030 FLAT 11.8 11.0 10.3 1-41705-1 1-41705 1-41705BIE
383 4-350-3750-5700-L 2-350-5700-2100 PREMIUM FORGED 4.030 FLAT 11.8 11.0 10.3 1-41710-1 1-41710 1-41710BIE
383 4-350-3750-5700-L 2-ICR5700-7/16 FORGED 4.030 DISH 10.4 9.8 9.2 1-41755-1 1-41755 1-41755BIE
383 4-350-3750-5700-L 2-350-5700-2100 PREMIUM FORGED 4.030 DISH 10.4 9.8 9.2 1-41760-1 1-41760 1-41760BIE
383 4-350-3750-5700-L 2-ICR5700-7/16 FORGED 4.030 DOME 14.0 12.4 11.9 1-41805-1 1-41805 1-41805BIE
383 4-350-3750-5700-L 2-350-5700-2100 PREMIUM FORGED 4.030 DOME 14.0 12.4 11.9 1-41810-1 1-41810 1-41810BIE
383 4-350-3750-5700-L 2-ICR6000-7/16 HYPEREUTECTIC 4.030 FLAT 11.8 11.0 10.3 1-41820-1 1-41820 1-41820BIE
383 4-350-3750-5700-L 2-ICR6000-7/16 FORGED 4.030 FLAT 11.8 11.0 10.3 1-41823-1 1-41823 1-41823BIE
383 4-350-3750-5700-L 2-350-6000-2100 PREMIUM FORGED 4.030 FLAT 11.8 11.0 10.3 1-41825-1 1-41825 1-41825BIE
383 4-350-3750-5700-L 2-ICR6000-7/16 HYPEREUTECTIC 4.030 DISH 10.4 9.8 9.2 1-41827-1 1-41827 1-41827BIE
383 4-350-3750-5700-L 2-ICR6000-7/16 FORGED 4.030 DISH 10.4 9.8 9.2 1-41829-1 1-41829 1-41829BIE
383 4-350-3750-5700-L 2-350-6000-2100 PREMIUM FORGED 4.030 DISH 10.4 9.8 9.2 1-41831-1 1-41831 1-41831BIE
383 4-350-3750-5700-L 2-ICR6000-7/16 HYPEREUTECTIC 4.030 DOME 14.1 12.9 12.0 1-41833-1 1-41833 1-41833BIE
383 4-350-3750-5700-L 2-ICR6000-7/16 FORGED 4.030 DOME 14.1 12.9 12.0 1-41835-1 1-41835 1-41835BIE
383 4-350-3750-5700-L 2-350-6000-2100 PREMIUM FORGED 4.030 DOME 14.1 12.9 12.0 1-41837-1 1-41837 1-41837BIE

O
IF YOU HAVE A TWO PIECE REAR SEAL BLOCK AND WANT TO USE 5.7" RODS SCAT LISTS THESE
CHEVY 350 SMALL-BLOCK 2-PC REAR SEAL 350 MAIN, 4340 FORGED CRANK, I-BEAM OR H-BEAM RODS WITH ARP 7/16" CAP SCREWS
CI Crank Rod Piston Boresize Type 58cc 64cc 70cc Inclcrp Inclcrprb Compl

383 4-350-3750-5700 2-ICR5700-7/16 HYPEREUTECTIC 4.030 FLAT 11.8 11.0 10.3 1-40600-1 1-40600 1-40600BI
383 4-350-3750-5700 2-ICR5700-7/16 FORGED 4.030 FLAT 11.8 11.0 10.3 1-40605-1 1-40605 1-40605BI
383 4-350-3750-5700 2-350-5700-2100 PREMIUM FORGED 4.030 FLAT 11.8 11.0 10.3 1-40610-1 1-40610 1-40610BI
383 4-350-3750-5700 2-ICR5700-7/16 HYPEREUTECTIC 4.030 DISH 10.4 9.8 9.2 1-40650-1 1-40650 1-40650BI
383 4-350-3750-5700 2-ICR5700-7/16 FORGED 4.030 DISH 10.4 9.8 9.2 1-40655-1 1-40655 1-40655BI
383 4-350-3750-5700 2-350-5700-2100 PREMIUM FORGED 4.030 DISH 10.4 9.8 9.2 1-40660-1 1-40660 1-40660BI
383 4-350-3750-5700 2-ICR5700-7/16 HYPEREUTECTIC 4.030 DOME 14.0 12.9 11.9 1-40700-1 1-40700 1-40700BI
383 4-350-3750-5700 2-ICR5700-7/16 FORGED 4.030 DOME 14.0 12.9 11.9 1-40705-1 1-40705 1-40705BI
383 4-350-3750-5700 2-350-5700-2100 PREMIUM FORGED 4.030 DOME 14.0 12.9 11.9 1-40710-1 1-40710 1-40710BI
383 4-350-3750-6000 2-ICR6000-7/16 HYPEREUTECTIC 4.030 FLAT 11.8 11.0 10.3 1-40750-1 1-40750 1-40750BI
383 4-350-3750-6000 2-ICR6000-7/16 FORGED 4.030 FLAT 11.8 11.0 10.3 1-40755-1 1-40755 1-40755BI
383 4-350-3750-6000 2-350-6000-2100 PREMIUM FORGED 4.030 FLAT 11.8 11.0 10.3 1-40760-1 1-40760 1-40760BI
383 4-350-3750-6000 2-ICR6000-7/16 HYPEREUTECTIC 4.030 DISH 10.4 9.8 9.2 1-40800-1 1-40800 1-40800BI
383 4-350-3750-6000 2-ICR6000-7/16 FORGED 4.030 DISH 10.4 9.8 9.2 1-40805-1 1-40805 1-40805BI
383 4-350-3750-6000 2-350-6000-2100 PREMIUM FORGED 4.030 DISH 10.4 9.8 9.2 1-40810-1 1-40810 1-40810BI
383 4-350-3750-6000 2-ICR6000-7/16 HYPEREUTECTIC 4.030 DOME 14.1 12.9 12.0 1-40850-1 1-40850 1-40850BI
383 4-350-3750-6000 2-ICR6000-7/16 FORGED 4.030 DOME 14.1 12.9 12.0 1-40855-1 1-40855 1-40855BI
383 4-350-3750-6000 2-350-6000-2100 PREMIUM FORGED 4.030 DOME 14.1 12.9 12.0 1-40860-1 1-40860 1-40860BI
395 4-350-3875-6000 2-350-6000-2100S PREMIUM FORGED 4.030 FLAT 12.2 11.4 10.6 1-40900-1 1-40900 1-40900BI



NEED A LOWER COST CAST STEEL CRANK, SCAT LISTS THESE

CHEVY 350 SMALL-BLOCK 2-PC REAR SEAL 350 MAIN, SERIES 9000 CAST CRANKS, I-BEAM RODS WITH 3/8" CAP SCREWS
CI Crank Rod Piston Boresize Type 58cc 64cc 70cc Inclcrp Inclcrprb Compl

383 9-350-3750-5700 2-ICR5700 HYPEREUTECTIC 4.030 FLAT 11.8 11.0 10.3 1-90300-1 1-90300 1-90300BE
383 9-350-3750-5700 2-ICR5700 FORGED 4.030 FLAT 11.8 11.0 10.3 1-90305-1 1-90305 1-90305BE
383 9-350-3750-5700 2-ICR5700 PREMIUM FORGED 4.030 FLAT 11.8 11.0 10.3 1-90310-1 1-90310 1-90310BE
383 9-350-3750-5700 2-ICR5700 HYPEREUTECTIC 4.030 DISH 10.4 9.8 9.2 1-90350-1 1-90350 1-90350BE
383 9-350-3750-5700 2-ICR5700 FORGED 4.030 FLAT 10.4 9.8 9.2 1-90355-1 1-90355 1-90355BE
383 9-350-3750-5700 2-ICR5700 PREMIUM FORGED 4.030 DISH 10.4 9.8 9.2 1-90360-1 1-90360 1-90360BE
383 9-350-3750-6000 2-ICR6000 HYPEREUTECTIC 4.030 FLAT 11.8 11.0 10.3 1-90450-1 1-90450 1-90450BI
383 9-350-3750-6000 2-ICR6000 FORGED 4.030 FLAT 11.8 11.0 10.3 1-90455-1 1-90455 1-90455BI
383 9-350-3750-6000 2-ICR6000 PREMIUM FORGED 4.030 FLAT 11.8 11.0 10.3 1-90460-1 1-90460 1-90460BI
383 9-350-3750-6000 2-ICR6000 HYPEREUTECTIC 4.030 DISH 10.4 9.8 9.2 1-90500-1 1-90500 1-90500BI
383 9-350-3750-6000 2-ICR6000 FORGED 4.030 DISH 10.4 9.8 9.2 1-90505-1 1-90505 1-90505BI
383 9-350-3750-6000 2-ICR6000 PREMIUM FORGED 4.030 DISH 10.4 9.8 9.2 1-90510-1 1-90510 1-90510BI
383 9-350-3750-6000 2-ICR6000 HYPEREUTECTIC 4.030 DOME 14.1 12.9 12.0 1-90550-1 1-90550 1-90550BI
383 9-350-3750-6000 2-ICR6000 FORGED 4.030 DOME 14.1 12.9 12.0 1-90555-1 1-90555 1-90555BI
383 9-350-3750-6000 2-ICR6000 PREMIUM FORGED 4.030 DOME 14.1 12.9 12.0 1-90560-1 1-90560 1-90560BI

CHEVY 400 SMALL-BLOCK 2-PC REAR SEAL 400 MAIN, SERIES 9000 CAST CRANKS, I-BEAM RODS WITH 3/8" CAP SCREWS
CI Crank Rod Piston Boresize Type 58cc 64cc 70cc Inclcrp Inclcrprb Compl
377 9-400-3500-6000 2-ICR6000 PREMIUM FORGED 4.155 FLAT 11.6 10.8 10.1 1-90610-1 1-90610 1-90610BI
377 9-400-3500-6000 2-ICR6000 PREMIUM FORGED 4.155 DOME 14.2 13.0 12.0 1-90710-1 1-90710 1-90710BI
407 9-400-3750-5700 2-ICR5700 HYPEREUTECTIC 4.155 FLAT 12.5 11.6 10.8 1-90750-1 1-90750 1-90750BE
407 9-400-3750-5700 2-ICR5700 FORGED 4.155 FLAT 12.5 11.6 10.8 1-90755-1 1-90755 1-90755BE
407 9-400-3750-5700 2-ICR5700 PREMIUM FORGED 4.155 FLAT 12.5 11.6 10.8 1-90760-1 1-90760 1-90760BE
407 9-400-3750-5700 2-ICR5700 FORGED 4.155 DISH 10.4 9.8 9.2 1-90805-1 1-90805 1-90805BE
407 9-400-3750-5700 2-ICR5700 PREMIUM FORGED 4.155 DISH 10.4 9.8 9.2 1-90810-1 1-90810 1-90810BE
407 9-400-3750-6000 2-ICR6000 HYPEREUTECTIC 4.155 FLAT 12.4 11.6 10.8 1-90900-1 1-90900 1-90900BI
407 9-400-3750-6000 2-ICR6000 FORGED 4.155 FLAT 12.4 11.6 10.8 1-90905-1 1-90905 1-90905BI
407 9-400-3750-6000 2-ICR6000 PREMIUM FORGED 4.155 FLAT 12.4 11.6 10.8 1-90910-1 1-90910 1-90910BI
407 9-400-3750-6000 2-ICR6000 HYPEREUTECTIC 4.155 DISH 11.1 10.3 9.7 1-90950-1 1-90950 1-90950BI
407 9-400-3750-6000 2-ICR6000 FORGED 4.155 DISH 11.1 10.3 9.7 1-90955-1 1-90955 1-90955BI
407 9-400-3750-6000 2-ICR6000 PREMIUM FORGED 4.155 DISH 11.1 10.3 9.7 1-90960-1 1-90960 1-90960BI
407 9-400-3750-6000 2-ICR6000 HYPEREUTECTIC 4.155 DOME 14.2 13.0 12.0 1-91000-1 1-91000 1-91000BI
407 9-400-3750-6000 2-ICR6000 FORGED 4.155 DOME 14.2 13.0 12.0 1-91005-1 1-91005 1-91005BI
407 9-400-3750-6000 2-ICR6000 PREMIUM FORGED 4.155 DOME 14.2 13.0 12.0 1-91010-1 1-91010 1-91010BI

CHEVY 350 SMALL-BLOCK 1-PC REAR SEAL 350 MAIN, SERIES 9000 CAST CRANKS, I-BEAM RODS WITH 3/8" CAP SCREWS
CI Crank Rod Piston Boresize Type 58cc 64cc 70cc Inclcrp Inclcrprb Compl

383 9-350-3750-5700-L 2-ICR5700 HYPEREUTECTIC 4.030 FLAT 11.8 11.0 10.3 1-91050-1 1-91050 1-91050BIE
383 9-350-3750-5700-L 2-ICR5700 FORGED 4.030 FLAT 11.8 11.0 10.3 1-91055-1 1-91055 1-91055BIE
383 9-350-3750-5700-L 2-ICR5700 PREMIUM FORGED 4.030 FLAT 11.8 11.0 10.3 1-91060-1 1-91060 1-91060BIE
383 9-350-3750-5700-L 2-ICR5700 HYPEREUTECTIC 4.030 DISH 10.4 9.8 9.2 1-91100-1 1-91100 1-91100BIE
383 9-350-3750-5700-L 2-ICR5700 FORGED 4.030 DISH 10.4 9.8 9.2 1-91105-1 1-91105 1-91105BIE
383 9-350-3750-5700-L 2-ICR5700 PREMIUM FORGED 4.030 DISH 10.4 9.8 9.2 1-91110-1 1-91110 1-91110BIE
383 9-350-3750-6000-L 2-ICR6000 HYPEREUTECTIC 4.030 FLAT 11.8 11.0 10.3 1-91200-1 1-91200 1-91200BIE
383 9-350-3750-6000-L 2-ICR6000 FORGED 4.030 FLAT 11.8 11.0 10.3 1-91205-1 1-91205 1-91205BIE
383 9-350-3750-6000-L 2-ICR6000 PREMIUM FORGED 4.030 FLAT 11.8 11.0 10.3 1-91210-1 1-91210 1-91210BIE
383 9-350-3750-6000-L 2-ICR6000 HYPEREUTECTIC 4.030 DISH 10.4 9.8 9.2 1-91250-1 1-91250 1-91250BIE
383 9-350-3750-6000-L 2-ICR6000 FORGED 4.030 DISH 10.4 9.8 9.2 1-91255-1 1-91255 1-91255BIE
383 9-350-3750-6000-L 2-ICR6000 PREMIUM FORGED 4.030 DISH 10.4 9.8 9.2 1-91260-1 1-91260 1-91260BIE
383 9-350-3750-6000-L 2-ICR6000 HYPEREUTECTIC 4.030 DOME 14.1 12.9 12.0 1-91300-1 1-91300 1-91300BIE
383 9-350-3750-6000-L 2-ICR6000 FORGED 4.030 DOME 14.1 12.9 12.0 1-91305-1 1-91305 1-91305BIE
383 9-350-3750-6000-L 2-ICR6000 PREMIUM FORGED 4.030 DOME 14.1 12.9 12.0 1-91310-1 1-91310 1-91310BIE


you won,t see much difference in the work required or parts cost if you used a 3.80" ,0r 3.875" stroke crank and pistons to build a stroker in that block to build a 388 or 396 stroker short block either


http://forum.grumpysperformance.com/viewtopic.php?f=53&t=2208&p=5942&hilit=+piston+suppliers#p5942

http://forum.grumpysperformance.com/viewtopic.php?f=53&t=204

viewtopic.php?f=51&t=2855

http://forum.grumpysperformance.com/viewtopic.php?f=53&t=1168

viewtopic.php?f=51&t=47

viewtopic.php?f=51&t=125

viewtopic.php?f=51&t=4324

viewtopic.php?f=51&t=1458

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=10705

viewtopic.php?f=51&t=3363

viewtopic.php?f=51&t=2692
 

grumpyvette

Administrator
Staff member
other sources of parts

http://www.dougherbert.com/catalog_2010 ... atalog.pdf

http://www.adperformance.com/index.php? ... x&cPath=71

http://ohiocrank.com/rotatepage1.html

viewtopic.php?f=51&t=439&p=538&hilit=+sources+parts#p538

http://www.jegs.com/c/Rotating-Assembly ... IC_Generic

http://www.cnc-motorsports.com/category.asp?CtgID=28765

http://www.campbellenterprises.com/engi ... r-kits.htm

http://www.racepartsdirect.com/product_ ... ts_id=3891

http://flatlanderracing.com/scatsr-chevysbforged.html


these links contain a great deal of related & useful info
yeah I know, its a huge amount of info in the links,
and sub-links that may take you days to wade through,
but in the long run it will save you lots of time,
and prevent a ton of wasted cash.


http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...g-block-for-stroker-assembly.2855/#post-77609

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/small-base-circle-cams.3810/#post-72554

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...ing-parts-and-a-logical-plan.7722/#post-71181

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/another-383-build.12786/page-2#post-66126

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/bits-of-383-info.38/page-2#post-61958

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...-for-new-383-sbc-cam-instal.13109/#post-68326

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/bits-of-383-info.38/page-2#post-61958

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...tion-of-crank-durring-short-blk-assembly.852/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/another-rings-end-gap-question.14994/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/oil-system-mods-that-help.2187/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/valve-train-clearances-and-problems.528/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...e-springs-and-setting-up-the-valve-train.181/
 
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grumpyvette

Administrator
Staff member
Im often asked what cam and which heads would be best for building a 383 sbc and the answer obviously will need to be matched to the application, your drive trains gearing engine compression and intended rpm range, now if your content to build a real torque monster, mid rpm range combo, to run on crappy 89 octane fuel a 9:1 compression ratio, and a cam in the mid 220 duration range and a 3.54-3.73 rear gear ratio, that will seldom need to exceed 5000rpm a mildly reworked set of vortec heads are not a bad choice.
something roughly similar to this build up
http://www.popularhotrodding.com/engine ... ewall.html

if you want to get significantly more peak hp, your going to need much less restrictive heads a longer duration cam and more compression
similar to these build ups, but pay attention to the relationship between cylinder head flow rates, port cross sectional area, cam timing and lift, compression ratio and the resulting power curve and at what rpms that power produced

http://www.trickflow.com/articles/triple_dog_388/

http://airflowresearch.com/articles/article085/A-P1.htm

http://airflowresearch.com/articles/art ... A16-P1.htm

http://www.chevyhiperformance.com/techa ... index.html

READ THIS
viewtopic.php?f=52&t=3810&p=10200&hilit=+small+base+cams#p10200

every choice results in a compromise, an engine that pulls smoothly from just above idle and makes killer torque well below 3500rpm, and gets decent long haul mileage with your over drive transmission and 2.87:1 rear gear ratio, is NOT going to produce the kind of bragging rights type horsepower numbers a higher compression ratio roller cam engine with a larger cam,bigger heads a 3500rpm stall converter and 4.11:1 rear gears will, but that more impressive engines not going to be great on long trips cruising at 1700rpm either like the first combo may be!

BaseCircleDiacv.jpg

hvsiclear1.jpg

if you wonder why I suggest using SCAT (H) beam style cap screw connecting rods vs stock or most (I) beam designs this picture should show the increased cam to connecting rod clearance

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=148
heres free cam selection software to narrow your choices[/color][/size]

just for grins put your info into this program, and don,t lie, and see what cam it suggests
http://www.camquest.com/

http://www.compcams.com/Pages/409/camquest-6.aspx

AS your displacement per cylinder increases the effective valve size per cubic inch decreases so you need a slightly tighter LSA and these charts should help.

0607phr_11_z+camshaft_basics+lobe_centerline_angle_determination_chart.jpg

Duration_v_RPM-Range_wIntakeManifold01.jpg


CamUsageChart01.jpg

software like the free comp cams software below[/color]
[/size]

http://www.compcams.com/Camquest/default.asp
viewtopic.php?f=52&t=181

viewtopic.php?f=50&t=1249&p=7598&hilit=stroker+tips#p7598

viewtopic.php?f=50&t=428&p=7304&hilit=stroker+tips#p7304

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=5078

viewtopic.php?f=44&t=38

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=5537&p=16744#p16744

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=2203

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=4221

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=3543

119671.jpg

119701.jpg

these two above make good cruising cams in a 9.5:1-10:1 cpr 383 and all require converter and rear gear changes to maximize the results

119571.jpg

119661d.jpg

these two above make good performance upgrades in cars used for daily transportation if your willing to put up with a lope in the idle and some loss of low rpm torque in exchange for more power higher up in the rpm band cams in a 10:1-10.5:1 cpr 383 and all require converter and rear gear changes to work correctly

all these cams below make good performance upgrades in cars used mostly for weekend toys with less and less compatibility for use in daily transportation if your willing to put up with a lope in the idle and some significant loss of low rpm torque in exchange for much more power higher up in the rpm band cams in a 10.5:1-12:1 cpr 383 and all require converter and rear gear changes to work correctly or even function in most cases

119691d.jpg

119581d.jpg


119681.jpg

119591.jpg


119601.jpg

119711.jpg
 

grumpyvette

Administrator
Staff member
to get a TRUE muscle car era lope sound you need HIGH COMPRESSION , reasonably large displacement a free flow exhaust and a cam with a reasonably TIGHT LSA and duration in the 220-250 @ .050 RANGE MINIMUM

I have built a bunch of 383-406 SBC engines over the decades, I have a few brands Of cams I try to use and a few I avoid like the plague , due to past experiences dealing with the companys.
most were built and used in muscle cars and used as daily drivers so they got hydraulic roller cams like a CRANE 119661
crane119661.png

or a CROWER 00471
crower00471.jpg

these produce good power and instantly responsive torque curves which in a daily driven car is far more important than a few extra peak HP!


http://www.herbertcams.com/560-580-lift-250-255-dur-050-110-lobe-center/

theres some rather significant advantages in ordering a cam that closely matches the engines, requirements, and after building dozens of similar engines youll notice some trends and you may want to tweak the cam timing, this of course requires both a good understanding of what your trying to change or accomplish and what the changes you intend to make are likely to do to engine performance.
some companys make custom ordering rather easy like HERBERT CAMS

heres a cam thats rather well known for producing good power in a 10.7:1 compression 406 SBC combo.
(use mostly for racing in a light weight car like a cobra replica)
Ive built several times in the past, it really requires the following matched components
210-230cc port heads, 6" scat rods on a forged SCAT crank, a 3600-3800rpm stall converter, a 4.11:1-4.56:1 rear gear and an automatic trans that shifts at 6300rpm under full load race acceleration.
a good single plane intake like the edelbrock VIC series, an 850 cfm carb, long tube 1 3/4" headers 1.6:1 roller rockers and a rocker stud girdle
customd2.png


heres the came basic cam, but with a few mods that provide about 20 extra horse power, but at the cost of a noticeably rougher lope in the idle
notice the tighter LSA and its a 4/7 swap cam version on a smaller base circle
customd1.png

heres a good combo as an example

build a 383 or 406 sbc like this, for an old school build


AFR 210cc heads
http://www.airflowresearch.com/index.php?cPath=24_33
11.5:1 cpr
crower00307.jpg

intake
http://www.summitracing.com/parts/HLY-300-110/
carb
http://www.summitracing.com/parts/HLY-0-80804RD/
406 short block
http://www.ohiocrank.com/chev_sb_shortb.html
a decent 7-9 quart, baffled oil pan that fits your chassis and 1 3/4" full length headers will get you there

406oldschool.jpg


if you've ever wondered WHY you should balance your engine 's rotating assembly,
and braze the oil pump pick-up to the pump, heres a few examples of what high rpm vibration, and constant stress,
can do to internal engine components over time

http://www.milodon.com/oil-system/oil-pumps.asp

IMG_5010.jpg

IMG_5011.jpg

IMG_5012.jpg

broken%20oilpickup.jpg

high volume oil pumps use is far more beneficial than high peak pressure in oil pumps,
remember peak pressure only happens at higher rpms and tests show,
no benefits in long term engine durability,
if peak oil pressure exceeds 65 psi or higher.

read links and sub links




grumpyvette said:
That T Bucket build is a buddy of mine. That little T Bucket is one bad momma jamma. I remember when I first rode in it, even before he tuned it and got it spot on. I nearly peed myself that thing has so much torque.
 
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grumpyvette

Administrator
Staff member
Re: bits of 383 info heres a street screach build thats inte

IVE NEVER DEALT WITH THESE GUYS BUT I HAVE BUILT SIMILAR COMBOS THAT PRODUCED SIMILAR RESULTS AND I FELT SOME GUYS MIGHT LIKE SEEING THIS

Engine Specs:
#880 Block 4bolt Block 1pc Seal
Scat 4340 3.750" Forged Crank
Scat 4340 5.7" H Beam Rods
10.1 Mahle Forged Pistons
Dart SHP 200cc/72cc Aluminum Heads (out of the box)
Hyd Roller Cam 247/253 @ 50 .602/618 112LSA
Crane 1.6 Roller Rockers
Edelbrock Air Gap Intake
MSD Pro Billet Dist
MSD 8mm Wires
Quick Fuel Q-750 Carb Jetted @ 72/82
Best ran at 36 degrees of timing

ENGINE PRODUCED 515HP @ 6000 RPM / 503TQ @ 4700RPM We ran up to 6200RPM on other pulls, but this was our final adjustment dyno. From 6000-6200 was pretty consistent and slowly started to dropped off at 6200RPM.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gtd6ZvAw ... r_embedded

http://wengines.com/index.html


CC123.jpg

CC124.jpg

CC125.jpg

CC126.jpg

CC127.jpg

CC128.jpg

CC129.jpg

CC133.jpg

CC134.jpg

CC135.jpg

CC136.jpg

CC137.jpg

CC138.jpg

CC139.jpg

Here we go

Dart SHP 72cc chamber ATK stock
Throat 89.6%
Bowl 91.5%
Short Side window CSA 2.71
Pushrod CSA 2.11
Length of port 5.53inches
Port volume measured 203.2cc
Avg CSA 2.24
Exhaust throat 85.3%
Exhaust Short side window CSA 2.00
Exhaust Exit CSA 1.85
Chamber volume measured 70.8cc

Flow stock 2.02/1.6 valves with back cut valves from dart.
INT EX
.1-66 56
.2-131 95
.3-188 132
.4-225 160
.5-257 179
.6-257 189
.7-251 194
.8-250 195
.9-249 196
.950-249 210with 1 7/8pipe
Flowed on a 4.155 bore using Champion RC12YC plug Brezenski 1206 radius plate.

Peak velocity over shortside 371fps
Peak velocity at pushrod pinch 335fps
Velocity center of pushrod pinch 300fps

http://high-performance-engines.com/index.shtml
 
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Indycars

Administrator
Staff member
I would have thought that kind of lift with a spider would be very unlikely.
Engine Specs:
#880 Block 4bolt Block 1pc Seal
Scat 4340 3.750" Forged Crank
Scat 4340 5.7" H Beam Rods
10.1 Mahle Forged Pistons
Dart SHP 200cc/72cc Aluminum Heads (out of the box)
Hyd Roller Cam 247/253 @ 50 .602/618 112LSA
Crane 1.6 Roller Rockers
Edelbrock Air Gap Intake
MSD Pro Billet Dist
MSD 8mm Wires
Quick Fuel Q-750 Carb Jetted @ 72/82
Best ran at 36 degrees of timing


CC125.jpg


What did Weingartner Racing have to do with this post, looks like ATK was doing all the work??? Weingartner is only 2 hours from my location.

http://wengines.com/index.html

 
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grumpyvette

Administrator
Staff member
I think Weingartner Racing did the head port work, and Ive never used those factory lifter retainer spider springs on a cam with over .550 lift and don,t think its a good idea.
IVe always used the retro fit lifters either the horizontal or vertical bar type, on roller cams
lifterretainers.jpg

this is certainly not ideal on a high rpm and high lift cam
rl1a.jpg

these are not high performance design lifters

rthl1.jpg


this type is more performance capable, especially matched to a rev kit

revkit2.jpg
 

grumpyvette

Administrator
Staff member
OBVIOUSLY theres a huge range of potential SBC builds possible and you'll want to select one that best fits your goals, If your intent on building a race 383-406 on a semi limited budget, for a light car Id at least look at these parts, installed on about a 10.5:1 compression short block, with a manual transmission and a 3.73:1-3.90:1 rear gear and 26'-28" slicks, some full length 1 3/4" headers and 1.6:1 ratio roller rockers,and a good 850 cfm holley carb, while that would not be my choice for a car designed for street use where you need some low and mid range, it would certainly produce good peak power

http://www.brodix.com/heads/ik210dyno.php

do yourself a HUGE favor :like:
and
read ALL these links and sub links carefully
yeah it may take you a week, or more ,
but its sure to significantly reduce your chance of screwing something up,
or wasting a good deal of cash, or damaging your engine.
yes you can generally swap to the 1.6:1 ratio vs the factory 1.5:1 rockers,
if you just go with the roller tip versions like these do little and don't reduce friction/ losses much.

41w8K0LzztL._AC_SS450_.jpg

its probably not going to gain you much,
going to full roller rockers is generally a 15-20 hp gain

M46375164.jpg

but be aware,
the resulting changes in rocker geometry and clearances may cause significant issues


I learned long ago to wait and buy what I really want rather that settle for what I can more easily afford.



http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/magnets.120/#post-76609

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/oil-system-mods-that-help.2187/#post-54398

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...rect-custom-length-pushrods.14241/#post-72346

https://www.chevyhardcore.com/tech-...zing-your-cams-potential-with-better-rockers/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...s-and-improved-oil-flow-mods.3834/#post-52402

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...ing-down-a-valve-train-noise.6237/#post-31799

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...ring-installation-questions.12833/#post-66380

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...er-rockers-and-stud-girdles.12208/#post-59297

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...ch-is-best-steel-or-aluminum.3124/#post-12385

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...train-clearances-and-problems.528/#post-44534

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...fit-under-stock-valve-covers.6641/#post-21035

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...per-valve-spring-seats-shims.1005/#post-15534

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/valve-train-shrapnel-screens.1458/#post-22845

yeah! Im aware your very likely to ignore the advice..
most readers will...
. but its a reference, I'm posting here, to help later
you , or anyone else doing similar
(SIMPLE MODS, TO THE VALVE TRAIN) can use.
if YOU DO need to find out what went wrong ,
because there's frequently little things you fail to think through as a new engine builder.
and why its costing you considerable problems, if you don't read through the links
and yes I learned many the hard/expensive way, before I learned to do research


READ THRU THESE LINKS

http://forum.grumpysperformance.com/viewtopic.php?f=52&t=5078

http://forum.grumpysperformance.com/viewtopic.php?f=69&t=3814

viewtopic.php?f=44&t=38&hilit=carb+spacer

http://forum.grumpysperformance.com/viewtopic.php?f=52&t=181
a day or so spent in research, reading and comparing previous engine builds and dyno results, could save you a great deal of wasted time and effort, and obviously you'll want to do rather extensive research before spending $1300-$2800 on a decent set of SBC cylinders heads for that 383.
personally ID select nothing smaller than a 200cc-220cc head if you have serious performance goals in mind, and remember the drive train and gearing tire size and cam timing along with the exhaust headers must match the intended. rpm/ power band.

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/sellecting-cylinder-heads.796/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/port-speeds-and-area.333/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/should-you-buy-bare-or-assembled-heads.534/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...-the-charts-calculators-and-basic-math.10705/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/shopping-for-heads.10602/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...n-chamber-or-piston-dome-or-port-volume.2077/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/valve-seat-angles-and-air-flow.8460/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...uild-the-engine-to-match-the-cam-specs.11764/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...e-springs-and-setting-up-the-valve-train.181/

http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...alves-and-polishing-combustion-chambers.2630/
you will find these threads useful if you read thru and look thru sub links most people don,t take the time to research and plan their engine builds to match the application, and as a result they tend to think they all want 500-600 plus hp from reading the magazine articles , but the truth is that a responsive engine with massive torque in the useable rpm range make for a far better choice if the cars street driven, now thats not saying you can,t have both impressive horsepower and a great torque curve but just keep in mind every choice is a compromise and if you concentrate on building an engine that works in the rpm band you actually use rather than getting mesmerized by peak hp numbers alone youll have better results youll also need to keep in mind it does no good to build a killer engine that produces 500-700 plus hp at 6700rpm and match it to a rear gear ratio and transmission gearing, and shift points or converter stall speed, that keeps the engine in the 1600rpm-6000rpm power range 90% of the time, if your smart your not competing for peak hp bragging rights your trying to build , impressive and instantly responsive torque in the useable rpm band, you also want to remember DURABILITY trumps PEAK POWER, you can,t win in the long term if the cars constantly needing repair and replacement of parts
http://www.summitracing.com/parts/HLY-300-110/
crane119681.jpg

at least look at these before ordering your heads
http://www.profilerperformance.com/raci ... -23-degree
210prof.jpg

Flow data. Flows some air for a 210cc as cast head. Valve job with some clean up only.. Intake only.

0.200 148.0
0.300 217.0
0.400 260.7
0.450 290.4
0.500 300.5
0.550 301.8
0.600 302.2
0.650 302.6
0.700 303.3
0.750 300.4
0.800 300.4

176 Series SBC Head Specifications
Material: Aerospace Specification, A356 Aluminum Alloy (Primary Virgin Ingot)
Valve Angle: 23deg valve angle to provide you with bolt on compatibility for stock accessories
Bore Spacing: Standard
Intake Port Volume & Shape: Oval-Shaped, PRECISION As-Cast 185cc, 195cc & 210cc
Combustion Chamber: Heart-Shaped, As-Cast - 64cc, 70cc, 72cc
Rocker System:Improved Solid Rocker Bar for added stability. May use standard or majority of aftermarket Rockers
Exhaust Valve Diameter: 1.600"
Intake Port Flow: 308cfm,
Intake Valve Diameter: 2.020"-2.100"
Deck Thickness: 1/2"
Milling: Angle - .0070" per cc Flat - .0050" per cc
Spark Plugs: Revised location to improve flame travel. .750 Reach, Gasketed (NGK R5671A-7 or colder)
Valve Train: Standard
Valve Guides: Manganese Bronze to assist in extending valve life
Spring Pocket: Maximum of 1.650 (no deeper)
Valve Seats: Steel
Valve Length: Intake – Stock +.100 long (1.900 Install) Exhaust - Stock +.100 long (1.900 Install)
Valve Covers: Drilled for both, center and rail bolt
Application: High Performance (i.e. street/strip/marine)
Engine Size: 185cc - 350+cid / 6000 rpm, 195cc - 350cid - 383cid / 6500rpm, 210cc - 383cid-427cid / 7000rpm
 
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Indycars

Administrator
Staff member
They look like a darn good deal with options like 2.08 intake valve and 3 chamber sizes to pick from. When I ran thru the options:

SBC 23 Degree Cylinder Head, 11/32 Guides & Steel Seats
Intake Port Size: 210cc Intake Ports
Chamber Size: 70cc As Cast Chamber
Spark Plug Orientation: Straight Plug
Intake Valves: 2.08/1.600 Valves ADD $25
Spring Package: Standard .650 Lift 1.525 Dual Springs, Retainers, Keepers

Price Each: $570

They do look a little limited at the higher lifts. They stop flowing any more after .500 lift and with the 1.6 rocker ratio the valve is lifting .592".

Pro-Filer-176-Series_200ccPorts.jpg

 
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grumpyvette

Administrator
Staff member
keep in mind that low lift flow below .500 lift produces air flow for a great deal longer time than the peak lift does and so its far more critical to the power curve.
flow at .500 lift and below could easily be three times longer in duration than peak flow above .500 lift , then consider that at 6000rpm the intake valve cycles from fully seated to open to fully seated in less than 1/50th of a second and youll realize why low lift flow is usually more important
pistonposition2a.jpg


BEFORE YOU START TO BUILD AN ENGINE< THINK THRU YOUR GOALS<BUDGET AND OPTIONS!
yes all to often youll start out with a semi reasonable budget and a detailed list of parts, and by the time the machine shop labor and all the little things you forgot to add in or things that became a requirement to get the combo running correctly are added into the final bill,
you look back and think back and realize you could have purchased a 502-572 big block for the true cost of that 383- 427 small block you built, and feel like puking! and realize that you need to think things thru and ask a great many more questions on your next build......thats called GAINING EXPERIENCE!


example, its hard to beat a 700hp 496 big block for $8K
http://www.vortecproperformance.com/eng ... tions.html
and thats hardly the only option
http://www.scoggindickey.com/?http://www.sdparts.com

http://www.herbertcams.com/dhp-555-stre ... ine-675hp/
 

grumpyvette

Administrator
Staff member
http://www.hotrod.com/techarticles/engi ... ewall.html

heres an article about building a 600 hp 383,
just keep in mind a combo like this requires race octane fuel and about a 4500rpm stall converter speed and a 4.11:1 rear gear
and would be all but useless on the street.




It may have been born on the wrong side of the tracks, but our "500 HP For Cheap," 383ci small-block Chevy (Sept. '06) has shed its humble origins and put on some class-namely, the 600hp class. Ace engine builder Joe Sherman has stepped up, metamorphosing our humble sow's ear into a silk purse, bolting on some serious parts to boost power as well as long-term reliability.

The genesis for the upgrade was an opportunity to test Air Flow Research's new Eliminator aluminum heads. Prototype castings were made available to us, and our budget 383 was handy, so we figured why not try to raise a 528.5hp mill over the 600hp barrier? Obviously, more cam was needed, and with more cam, much stouter valvesprings were required. The bigger springs wouldn't fit the heads without longer valves, and the longer valves generated valvetrain-geometry issues. Solving those issues required premium valvetrain components. But that's hot-roddin'. And we're getting ahead of ourselves. Let's begin at the beginning.

For the test, the 383ci short-block, less cam, remained in its original, budget Street Fighter configuration as built by Coast High Performance. The preassembled crate package consisted of a two-bolt-main 350 block bored 0.030-over and stuffed with a 3.75-inch-stroke, cast-steel crank that swings profiled CNC beam-forged 5140 steel, 5.7-inch center-to-center rods fitted with full-floating, flat-top, CNC-machined forged pistons.

Air Flow Research heads have a stellar industry reputation. But as good as its current heads are, technology does not stand still. AFR thought it was time for a major design enhancement, and the result was its new Eliminator head series based on a common CNC-machined casting. Equivalently sized Eliminator configurations are coming online to replace all AFR's current small-block Chevy heads, including the 180, 195, and 210cc street heads, plus the 220, 227, and raised-port 215 race heads. Like AFR's previous head generation, the new configurations will be fully CNC-ported with a choice of two levels: street or competition. Competition porting produces a more finely detailed port that more accurately reproduces the as-designed surfaces-but it takes longer, so it's more costly.

Whether they are street- or competition-ported, the various Eliminator heads will be otherwise identical in terms of valve sizes and port shape and volume with one exception: The 195cc street heads have 2.055 intake/ 1.60 exhaust valves; with the intake-port entrances sized for Fel-Pro PN 1205 intake gaskets, they mate well with Edelbrock's Performer RPM, RPM Air Gap, and Victor Jr. intake manifolds. The 195cc competition heads' intake entrances are sized for the larger Fel-Pro PN 1206 intake gaskets and use a bigger 2.08 intake valve (1.60 valves are still used on the exhaust side).

In Sherman's experience, a 383 small-block needs at least a 210cc intake-runner volume to make serious power. In fact, our budget 383 had been using aftermarket iron heads with a 220cc intake runner, 2.02/1.60 valves, and angled spark plugs. Unfortunately, the only available AFR Eliminator heads ready in time for our short-lead-time test were prototype 195cc street-ported heads, which would be giving away 25 cfm of port volume (although their 2.055 intake valve is larger). However, in tests on Sherman's SuperFlow bench, these prototype 195 street heads hit 280 cfm at 0.500-inch lift with some of the most impressive low- and midlift numbers Sherman had ever seen.

AFR said the competition 195s should reach 300 cfm at 0.600 lift. The larger 210cc configurations are said to flow a whopping 310 cfm at 0.600 lift with even more available at higher lifts. Official numbers aren't yet available for the 220cc heads, but rumor has it that they should flow over 320 cfm. All this, and the heads still retain the traditional 23-degree Chevy small-block valve angles and spacing, making them true, bolt-on performance enhancers.

Engine Build 600Hp Engine
Movin' on up: Air Flow Research's new 195cc Eliminator street heads plus a Comp oval-track
Engine Build Exhaust Port
Sherman says the new exhaust port is visibly larger than the old design, now displacing 80

Engine Build Airflow Engine Head
Air Flow Research is retooling its small-block Chevy cylinder-head lineup. With fully rede

Comp Roller Cam
A tried-and-true way of making more power is to spin the engine higher. Not only does this mandate a stout cam and valvetrain, but it also requires that the short-block be reliable enough to hold up to higher rpm's added abuse-bottom-end loading increases by the square of the increase in rpm. But as Sherman put it, "The short-block we are using is not a racing short-block. It has no four-bolt [main] caps." Cam selection, therefore, represented a fusion of the need to keep the engine alive and the need to achieve our power goals. In Sherman's estimation, the new cam needed to peak at about 7,000 rpm with a redline of 7,300-7,400 rpm. Based on those constraints, and also taking into consideration the recent troubles the industry has experienced with flat-tappet cam profiles, Sherman spec'd one of Comp Cams' standard catalog listings: a tight lobe-separation, oval-track mechanical roller grind No. 287TKR-6. With the hairy cam, piston-to-valve clearance came in at a tight 0.050-inch intake/ 0.060-inch exhaust, but Sherman wasn't worried: "With a [solid] roller cam, the valves can't float unless you really have a problem. I feel comfortable at this level."

Keeping the cam under control requires a stout yet lightweight valvetrain. The lighter you can make the components without inducing part failure, the easier the engine will rev up to its required rpm goal-so special roller lifters with a cut-down body plus titanium retainers were installed along with Comp's lightweight Hi-Tech dual valvesprings. This valvespring/retainer assembly has a larger diameter and is also taller than the hydraulic roller cam-compatible springs AFR's street heads are usually delivered with . . . and that's why the valvetrain situation began to get a little sticky.

Accommodating the larger, taller valvesprings ultimately required both machining the existing valve pockets 0.100 inch deeper and swapping in 0.100-inch longer-than-stock valves. Why not just use offset valve locks? We weren't going to get off that easily: The new AFR heads use valves with the LS engine-style, 8mm-od valve stems machined for groove-lock valve keys in place of the traditional small-block Chevy's 111/432-inch stems machined for old-school, square-groove keepers. The smaller valve stems save weight, while the bead-lock adds durability, but the downside is that offset keys and similar devices normally used to help correct geometry and interference issues are not available in this configuration. Fortunately, AFR had the necessary 0.100-inch-long valves in stock, but the longer valves ended up adversely affecting valvetrain geometry.

http://www.compcams.com/Company/CC/cam- ... d=359&sb=2

Different-length pushrods, the usual geometry-correction method, proved untenable because the right-length pushrods resulted in the rocker arms contacting the valvespring retainers. Even assuming no retainer-clearance issues, Sherman maintains that, in his experience, optimum (as opposed to marginal) geometry cannot be obtained on a conventional small-block Chevy stud-mount valvetrain with 0.100-inch-long valves because the rocker's arc of travel across the valve-stem tip still ends up way off the original factory design intent.

Although you could relocate the rocker-arm stud (which requires considerable modification, including welding, drilling, and tapping), at this point, the sensible solution is to bite the bullet and move up to a shaft-mount valvetrain, such as Jesel's Sportsman design. Besides being inherently more stable at high rpm, the Jesel design improves the geometry by relocating the rocker's pivot fulcrum centerline with no need for custom machining. Of course, they're not cheap.

Weird pushrod lengths are not usually needed with the Jesel setup. You can shim the rocker stand to raise its height, or if needed, you can mill the bar or pads the rocker arm screws down onto to lower the assembly height. In fact, using 1.6:1 intake and 1.5:1 exhaust rocker ratios on this engine, the Jesel setup did such a good job that Sherman was able to achieve the correct geometry using 7.800-inch-long, standard-length small-block Chevy pushrods plus the 0.100-inch-thick shims included in the Jesel kit. By contrast, Sherman said the stud-mounted valvetrain would need 7.950-inch pushrods-and "it still wouldn't be ideal."

Engine Build Valves
Besides their superior sealing characteristics, Cometic MLS head gaskets can be quick-orde
Engine Build Mls Head Gaskets
Unlike a so-called drag-racing profile, oval-track solid roller cam features a tighter lob

Engine Build Lobe Separation
Comp Hi-Tech dual springs (PN 26089) get the job done with smaller-diameter spring wire. T

Engine Build Comp Hi Tech Dual Springs
Comp Hi-Tech dual springs (PN 26089) get the job done with smaller-diameter spring wire. T

The engine was installed on Sherman's SuperFlow 901 dyno with the same induction and exhaust components used during the motor's previous budget incarnation: Patriot 131/44-inch primary-tube headers running through Hooker 3-inch AeroChamber mufflers, an Edelbrock Super Victor intake manifold, a Summit 1-inch phenolic open carb spacer, and a Speed Demon 850-cfm vacuum carburetor. The original GM HEI was upgraded to an MSD distributor and ignition-control box. A Milodon drag-race oil pan, a high-volume pump, and a corresponding pump screen enhanced the oil system. Every little thing counts for making those big power numbers, so Sherman even spec'd out the spark plugs, using NGK R5672-8 plugs-a medium-cold, projected-tip, wide-gap racing design. Provided the ignition is up to the job, wide spark-plug caps (0.060 inch in this case) can be worth 5 or so horsepower. And the projected tip lets the engine make that power with 3 degrees less total advance. With total timing set to 35 degrees on 91-octane Chevron unleaded pump gas, Sherman was ready to pull the throttle lever.

Sherman found the 850-cfm, vacuum-secondary carb was too lean, which required stepping up about three jet sizes each on the primary and secondary sides to No. 86 and No. 94 jets respectively. Once the fuel curve was dialed in, the motor achieved our goal, making over 600 hp from 6,500 through 7,000 rpm and peaking at 605.8 hp at 6,700. Over 500 lb-ft of torque was developed between 4,800 and 5,700 rpm, with the peak of 521.2 lb-ft occurring at 5,000 rpm. Still, the curve was slightly ragged, and Sherman felt that installing his favorite Mighty Demon 850-cfm double-pumper should both smooth out the curve and make more peak power.

Mechanical-Secondary Carb
The Mighty Demon is Sherman's go-to dyno-mule carb. Without a choke tower, it has smoother airflow, plus its out-of-the-box 86/94 jetting was just what the engine liked. Bolting it on in place of the vacuum model smoothed and broadened the curves. The peak torque point was raised 200 rpm to 5,200, where the engine pounded out 528.5 lb-ft, a gain of 7.3 lb-ft over the vacuum-carb configuration. Even better, the engine now made a 615.4hp peak at 6,800, nearly a 10hp gain; it made over 600 hp from 6,400-7,200 rpm.

Head-Flow Data
New AFR Eliminator 195cc intake port street heads equipped with 2.055/1.60 valves were flowed at 28 inches of water by Sherman on his SuperFlow bench.
Engine Build Roller Lifter
At 7,000 rpm, valvetrain mass becomes critical; it needs to be as light as possible withou
LIFT (INCHES) INTAKE (CFM) EXHAUST (CFM)
0.100 70.4 56.7
0.200 149.5 114.1
0.300 201.2 164.9
0.400 253.2 199.6
0.500 280.2 217.7
0.600 277.0 222.1
0.700 276.1 225.9

The Price Of Performance
Assuming retention of the CHP preassembled short-block, the engine as tested with the remanufactured vacuum-secondary Speed Demon 850-cfm carb costs about $9,200. Substituting the Mighty Demon 850 double-pumper adds about $80 to the price, bringing the total to just under $9,275. You could lop off $445 from the price by buying the heads fully assembled from Air Flow, including the necessary mechanical roller-cam upgrades. Finally, as noted in the original article, assembling the short-block and rotating assembly yourself would cut another $371 off the price, bringing the bottom-line cost in at under $8,460.

Any way you slice it, 615 hp from a set of street heads is indicative of just how far engine technology has advanced. Also worthy of note is that the power ended up peaking at only 6,700-6,800 rpm, not the 7,000 rpm Sherman originally intended. This indicates the need for an even larger port-if the small 195cc intake port and a catalog cam can make 1.6 hp/ci on a pump-gas 383, one can only imagine what AFR's new 210 or 220cc Eliminator heads will be capable of once they become available.

Engine Build Carberator
Two different 850-cfm Demon carbs were tested-the original 850-cfm vacuum-secondary Speed
Engine Build Oil Pan
Milodon's 6-quart (less filter), Pro Competition, stepped-sump, Camaro/Chevelle drag-race
Engine Build Valve Stem
AFR's LS-engine-style 8mm valve stems are machined for stronger, rounded bead-lock valve k

DYNO RESULTS
850 VACUUM 850 DOUBLE-
PUMPER
SPEED
(RPM) TORQUE
(LB-FT) POWER
(HP) TORQUE
(LB-FT) POWER
(HP)
4,600 506.1 443.3 499.2 437.2
4,700 498.4 446.0 499.4 446.9
4,800 510.7 466.7 511.2 467.2
4,900 514.8 480.3 521.4 486.5
5,000 521.2 496.2 525.2 500.0
5,100 517.1 502.1 528.4 513.1
5,200 516.7 511.6 528.5 523.3
5,300 516.8 521.5 526.5 531.3
5,400 515.1 529.6 523.5 538.3
5,500 514.1 538.4 520.0 544.6
5,600 504.8 538.2 517.4 551.7
5,700 502.6 545.2 512.1 555.8
5,800 498.2 550.2 509.9 563.1
5,900 501.1 562.9 511.6 574.7
6,000 503.0 574.6 508.5 580.9
6,100 496.9 577.1 503.3 584.6
6,200 496.5 586.1 498.7 588.7
6,300 488.6 586.1 495.4 594.3
6,400 488.8 595.6 493.8 601.7
6,500 485.0 600.2 492.1 609.0
6,600 479.0 601.9 487.4 612.5
6,700 474.9 605.8 481.1 613.7
6,800 466.6 604.1 475.3 615.4
6,900 459.7 603.9 466.4 612.7
7,000 453.4 604.3 460.3 613.5
7,100 443.1 599.0 449.6 607.8
7,200 432.1 592.4 439.3 602.2
7,300 419.3 582.8 428.1 595.0


LOOKING OVER THE BUILD ID suggest the following changes

INTAKE
http://www.summitracing.com/parts/HLY-300-110/

heads
http://www.summitracing.com/parts/AFR-1054/
cam
crower00430x.jpg


headers with 1 7/8" primaries 36" long and a 19" long, 3.5"diam. collector
 

Indycars

Administrator
Staff member
Grumpyvette said:
LOOKING OVER THE BUILD ID suggest the following changes


I am assuming you mean changes if you were to use this motor for the street. But it hardly
seems as if you made much of a change, in fact the LSA went the wrong direction for
streetabilty (106° to 105°) . The Crower is 3-4 degrees shorter duration at .050" and about
.020" of lift smaller.

Is it really going to make that much difference in this motors streetability??? Is it in the
way each company rates their camshafts?

CamComparison01.jpg

I don't understand how the removal of the choke horn on the double pumper carb would
smooth out the curve. I can see where it would improve equally over the entire
RPM range. So what's going on that I'm not getting???


JoeShermanCurves01.jpg
JoeShermanDataTable01.JPG
.
 
Last edited:

grumpyvette

Administrator
Staff member
Indycars said:
Grumpyvette said:
LOOKING OVER THE BUILD ID suggest the following changes


I am assuming you mean changes if you were to use this motor for the street. But it hardly
seems as if you made much of a change, in fact the LSA went the wrong direction for
streetabilty (106° to 105°) . The Crower is 3-4 degrees shorter duration at .050" and about
.020" of lift smaller.

Is it really going to make that much difference in this motors streetability??? Is it in the
way each company rates their camshafts?



I don't understand how the removal of the choke horn on the double pumper carb would
smooth out the curve. I can see where it would improve equally over the entire
RPM range. So what's going on that I'm not getting???
A FEW VIDEOS TO HELP YOUR ASSEMBLY

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eSxjI6BxgpI

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PXFT4ShDryk

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PbbPXuwDYfE

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rXp1vVtsp7s

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xQFlaDhWsck

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r1PO26ZqUEs

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sQhNIiPyTB4

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iuj9nfQ-LRY

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HrtQVhcTPFc

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ypQwgm1H2NU

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-VwsbEg7Z4I

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bcMuttJ9RFc

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1LcYEZwOIQQ




no the changes suggested have ZERO to do with any factor other than increasing the durability and slightly lowering the torque curve as Ive found trading a bit of peak power for a bit more durability is a good trade, in a race engine, theres zero doubt that JOES ENGINE should produce better peak power, but Id strongly suspect the slightly milder cam and slightly lower rpm power curve would allow the engine to last noticeably longer, before needing maintenance.... yes I probably should have pointed out WHY I wanted to make those changes
 
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