Why is the LS Engine so good..

Grumpy

The Grumpy Grease Monkey mechanical engineer.
Staff member
http://www.hotrod.com/articles/ls-turns-20-retires/
https://books.google.com/books?id=8...hDoAQhhMAk#v=onepage&q=afr dyno tests&f=false
The LS Turns 20 … and Retires
Written by Jeff Smith on September 25, 2017
GM Archives - Photography;





It’s enough to give the rest of the V-8 world an inferiority complex. Big, V-8 engines are very much an American thing while the rest of the world seems to prefer buzzy little four cylinders or perhaps quiescent electric motors. But here in the land of the free and home of More Torque, our preferences lie with big, powerful two-valve pushrod engines.

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Perhaps it’s appropriate that the movie The Lost World, Jurassic Park opened in 1997, the same year as the LS1. Appropriate because this latest iteration of the small-block Chevy really made the Gen I small-block seem antediluvian. In a quick two decades, even that original LS1 now seems frail compared to today’s steroidal Gen V technology.


We thought it might be fun to look back at how far this all-aluminum small-block has progressed, make some comparisons, and track its progression from the humble LS1 to the assertive Gen V LT1 and big-brother LT4.







Legacy is an appropriate descriptor that’s often applied to the Gen III family of engines that grew out of the Gen I small-block of 1955. The LS1 retained several important design aspects, including the small-block’s 4.400-inch bore spacing as well as the same bellhousing bolt pattern. This nod to the past was no accident. These simple steps allowed car builders to easily adapt the new LS to older cars, creating a whole new segment of the performance industry.

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While the Gen III is architecturally more similar than different compared to its Eisenhower-era predecessor with pushrods, two valves per cylinder, and a wedge combustion chamber, that’s pretty much where the similarities end. Besides the deep-skirted block that adds strength, the most significant changes were all in the cylinder heads. Port flow increased dramatically, accompanied by a radical shift from a 23-degree valve angle to a much flatter and flow-enhancing 15-degree angle accompanied by attendant changes in the ports that complemented the valve angle. Plus, a far flatter and more efficient combustion chamber allowed a welcomed increase in compression. The changes not only added power but were accompanied by improved fuel economy and lower exhaust emissions. This was the engineering equivalent of a trifecta.

Taking a somewhat broader view, improving power and efficiency can only be achieved with control. If we look at the Gen III, it is a study in controlling events. The engine control Unit (ECU) knows not only where the crank is at all times but the camshaft as well and can manipulate performance and mileage with injector pulse width, electronic throttle control (ETC), and timing.

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The ECU knows when the engine detonates and can adjust for that on the fly, compensating for elevated engine inlet air temperature, all while making tuning adjustments in millisecond increments. Even the smallest of the Gen III engines, the 4.8L and 5.3L truck engines, enjoyed major power improvements over the Gen I and II designs.

The first big performance enhancement came with the LS6 bumping power by 55 hp to 405. It was clear a horsepower race was enjoined with the appearance of the 427ci, 7.0L LS7 touting 505 hp and 470 lb-ft of torque. Everybody wanted an LS7. It reminded the older guys of the rock ’n’ roll ’60s, right down to the RPO numbers. But what was this? A factory V-8 with a dry-sump oiling system? Only race cars have dry sumps. The sprint was now a full-on stampede. What could they do to top an LS7?

The LS2 actually predated the LS7 and quickly experienced a few minor improvements that were sufficient to call it a Gen IV engine. This engine enjoyed a displacement bump to 6.0 liters with a 4.00-inch bore and base power of 400 hp, but that remained only for a short time until the LS3 debuted. Here was where the promise of big power began its climb.

Engine guys could see the telltale signs with the single Internet digital image of those rectangle-shaped intake ports. Those ports where huge, everyone said. And the power numbers jumped again along with displacement now up to 6.2 liters (375 inches). Could it get any better? Absolutely!

The horsepower escalator was hooked directly to GM’s dyno cell and those guys in the white coats were pushing all the right power buttons. You can only get so much from using atmospheric pressure, so the next best thing was to use a pump to push the air into the intake ports. The LS9 was essentially the answer to the age-old quest. The C6 Corvette raised the stakes with 638 hp and 604 lb-ft of torque using a Roots-style Eaton 2300cc supercharger on top of an already outstanding 6.2L engine. This made monster power and carried a warranty!

This was followed by a milder LSA supercharged version for the ZL1 Camaro and Cadillac CTS-V, this time with a smaller 1.9L Eaton blower making 556 hp and 551 lb-ft of torque. Both the LS9 and LSA are now available as crate engines in Chevrolet Performance’s expansive 400-page horsepower catalog with the LSA the much more affordable of the two. Keep in mind as well that these are SAE horsepower and torque ratings that are much more conservative than the typical hot rod correction factor. The difference is the factory rating system is about 5 percent lower than the hot rod factor, meaning that a 556 hp rating for the LSA is roughly equal to 580 hp using the hot rod correction factor. This is true for normally aspirated engines as well.

While power is always a good thing, control has improved at the same time. Fuel mileage has often thought to be the antithesis of performance, but creative engineering means coming up with ways to accomplish both. First it was variable valve timing (VVT), which exerts control over cam timing by allowing the ECU to advance or retard the cam as much as 62 degrees in Gen IV engines. Add to that what GM calls Active Fuel Management (AFM), which really is the art of pulling four cylinders off line under light power applications in search of better fuel mileage.

The search for more internal combustion power throughout the 20th century was most often accomplished on either side of the combustion chamber. But to the true devotees of combustion science, much of the real magic happens in the combustion space above the piston. The Gen IV engines had proved to be excellent role models with regard to power, which of course predicated a goal toward increased efficiency. The next step toward increased fuel management was to move its point of entry from upstream of the intake valve to inside the combustion chamber. The acronym creators call this gasoline direct injection or GDI.

This is not new science. Diesel engines have been perfecting this art for nearly as long as the internal combustion engine. Sprint Car engine builders have been doing this for decades. The key to GDI was to improve the combustion event with the goal of extracting more power from less fuel. The trick to injecting fuel into the combustion chamber is to do so at extreme pressures to ensure vaporization. This is exactly what the Gen V LT1 is all about. A high-pressure pump located just above the lifter valley generates pressures as high as 2,300 psi. The mechanical pump is driven off the camshaft and the fuel is shot directly into the center of the combustion space on top of the piston just after the intake valve closes.

Not only does this precisely control the fuel to each cylinder but the direct injection also allows a higher compression ratio for the same octane, which has the mutually beneficial effect of improving fuel mileage while simultaneously increasing power. While the LT1 has garnered much of the attention as the engine for the Corvette and Camaro, GDI is also shared with the newest truck engines as well. The 5.3L L83 and the 6.2L L86 truck powerplants are not only all-aluminum torque beasts but also enjoy the benefits of GDI.

A little-known fact about the L86 truck engine is that while its horsepower rating is down compared to the LT1, by merely installing the LT1 oil pan and intake manifold on this engine, you essentially have an LT1 as all other aspects, including the compression ratio, cylinder heads, and the camshaft as they are all the same. GM merely tuned the intake manifold to build more torque for the truck applications. So in the near future, it would pay dividends to keep an eye out for the L86 as another of the best deals in horsepower to come out of the small-block legacy.

So while the Gen III LS1 is now 20 years old and has been usurped by its newer Gen V cousins, the foundation of pushrod, two-valve-per-cylinder performance is still as robust as ever. Let the other guys build their ultra-complex, dual overhead cam engines. The line still forms just behind the Gen V. It would be smart to check in with the LS movement every once in a while. It’s bound to change again soon and no doubt for the better.

Power Numbers

Engine Displ. HP TQ
LS1, Gen III 5.7L, 346ci 350 365
LS6, Gen III 5.7L, 346ci 405 400
LS7, Gen III 7.0L, 427ci 505 470
LS2, Gen IV 6.0L, 364ci 400
LS3, Gen IV 6.2L, 376ci 430 425
LS9, Gen IV* 6.2L, 376ci 638 604
LSA, Gen IV* 6.2L, 376ci 556 551
LT1, Gen V 6.2L, 376ci 460 465
LT4, Gen V* 6.2L, 376ci 650 650
*Supercharged

Bore and Stroke Combinations

Displacement Bore Stroke
4.8L 293ci 3.78 3.26
5.3L 325ci 3.78 3.62
5.7L 346ci 3.89 3.62
6.0L 364ci 4 3.62
6.2L 376ci 4.065 3.62
7.0L 427ci 4.125 4
Compression Ratios

Engine Compression
Ratio
LS1 10.25:1
LS6 10.5:1
LS2 10.9:1
LS3 10.7:1
LS7 11.0:1
LT1 11.5:1
01-ls-20-year-anniversary.jpg

Dean Livermore of Hot Rods by Dean is shown fine-tuning our LS-powered Road Tour 1959 Chevy … and it’s still running strong having survived several Hot Rod Power Tours as well as a summer on the Road Tour. Amazingly reliable motor.
02-ls-20-year-anniversary.jpg

The fun with an LS and hot rodders is that you never know what you are going to get … “like a box of chocolates,” as the old movie line goes. How about a full set of Speedway Motors 9Super7 carbs on an Edelbrock intake manifold for this LS.
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Here the LS used in our 1959 Chevy was set up by Shaver Engines topped off with an Inglese-stacked injection system.
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Another mildly customized LS, this time again set up with an Inglese eight-stack EFI. Note coil packs were retained on top of the valve covers but hidden beneath faux valve covers.
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This LT1 is the latest generation of what began as the LS1 in 1997. Now outfitted with gasoline direct injection (GDI) and more compression, the original LS1 made 350 hp while the current LT1 makes 460. Think you’d feel the difference?
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This LS3 is topped off with a FAST LSXR intake; note coil packs are removed from the top of the valve covers and placed forward in the engine compartment on the frame.
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We’ve had 20 years to perfect the LS engine swap and the move has become incredibly pervasive. This is an EROD LS swap into a G-body El Camino perfected by the guys at Holley.
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Here is an LS3 as you may have received from Chevrolet Performance.
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A quick way to spot a factory Gen IV LS engine is by the front-mounted cam sensor. Of course, it’s also very easy to swap one of these covers onto an earlier engine, as shown here on an iron 6.0L block so be vigilant.
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This LS is all business, retaining stock coil pack location, Hooker exhaust manifolds, and FAST LSX intake.
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How much better is GDI over multipoint fuel injection? A fair comparison would be to look at the horsepower and torque of the 6.2L LS3 versus the 6.2L LT1. It’s really not a fair fight since the LT1 (shown) has a full point more compression that helps it make 30 more horsepower and a shocking 40 lb-ft more torque.
12-ls-20-year-anniversary.jpg


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We put the Chevrolet Performance crate engines to a dollar-per-horsepower test and the contest came down to a tie between the LS376 480 hp and LS376 515 hp versions of the LS3. The 480 hp version really makes 495 hp as an LS3 with a factory HOT cam with 0.525-inch lift. This is a carbureted engine.
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Among the most significant changes in the LS series was the Gen IV configuration change to larger volume rectangle port cylinder heads elevated from the Gen III’s cathedral ports. This rectangle port configuration has been carried over to the Gen V with some minor changes.
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The most significant change from Gen IV to V was the addition of gasoline direct injection (GDI). Fuel is now injected from a very high pressure mechanical pump located just underneath the intake manifold directly into the cylinders.
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This shot of the combustion chamber reveals the location of the fuel injector located directly across from the spark plug. Extreme pressure means the fuel will be conditioned more accurately into smaller particles to burn more efficiently. The goal has always been to make more power with less fuel.
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Among the improvements demanded by increased power, especially with superchargers, is additional cooling for the pistons. Engineers used small oil squirters located at the bottom of the cylinder to aim pressurized oil at the underside of the pistons to pull heat out of the crown. This was initiated with the LS7 and continued on the supercharged LT4.
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If you’re looking for the big-daddy horsepower king-of-the-hill, look no further than the LS9. This engine can abuse the rear tires with 604 lb-ft of torque at 3,800 rpm and still spin the dials up to 638 hp at 6,500.
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Crate engines have become the easiest way to bolt horsepower into almost any car with Gen V engines right at the top of the list. Making it even easier is the Connect and Cruise concept where with just a couple of part numbers you can order, for example, a 6.2L LT4 supercharged engine backed by either a four- or eight-speed automatic.
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A Gen V move that has not received much attention is the power improvement gained by using E85 (85 percent ethanol) in a direct-injected engine. The L83 5.3L direct-injected Gen V truck engines are designed to run as Flex Fuel engines—especially with E85. With their GDI higher compression, Lingenfelter Performance testing gained 19 rwhp and 23 lb-ft of torque on a 2014 truck using E85.
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The LS1 was the original Gen III engine. Displacing a mere 345 ci, it employed unique cathedral port heads, a 10.2:1 compression ratio, and a 0.470-inch lift hydraulic roller cam to make a reasonable 345 hp and 30 lb-ft of torque.
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The LS6 was the first performance upgrade in 2001 with more compression (10.6:1) and a cam with 0.550-inch lift, and an improved intake that together bumped the power to 385 hp and 385 lb-ft of torque.
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Major changes were afoot for the LS2 that fronted the evolution to Gen IV. The big news was a bump to a 4.00-inch bore increasing the displacement to 6.0L (364ci) and compression to 10.9:1 to make 400 hp and 400 lb-ft of torque.
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GM raised the dissonance factor in 2005 when Corvette upped the ante by resurrecting the LS7 RPO for this all-aluminum 7.0L (427ci) spinner. As a crate engine, it still can hit the high notes with its normally aspirated 505 hp at 475 for torque.
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In 2008, just a little over a decade after the LS1 debuted, Chevrolet decided size matters with a 6.2L (376ci) LS2 base engine for the Corvette with a 4.060-inch bore and big rec-port heads pushing 2.165-inch hollow-stem intake valves. Compression crept up to 10.7:1 along with power now at 430 hp and torque at 424 lb-ft.
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The 2010 Camaro’s L99 6.2L engine differed only slightly from its LS3 cousin, adding Active Fuel Management (AFM) as well as variable valve timing (VVT) to deliver 400 hp and 410 for torque.
35-ls-20-year-anniversary.jpg

In the LS engine family hierarchy there can only be one king of the hill. Based on the LS3, the supercharged LS9 put a leg up on the rest of the clan with an Eaton 2.3L Eaton blower making 638 hp and 604 for torque all still from 6.2 liters. You can buy one straight out of the crate.
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As a slightly detuned LS9, the ZL1 Camaro’s LSA supercharged 6.2L is no slouch. The LSA spins a smaller 1.9L TVS Eaton blower and claims 556 hp at 6,100 with 551 lb-ft of torque all the way down at 3,800 rpm. This engine too, is available as a wet sump crate package—ready to bolt right in.
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In addition to straight production-based LS crate engines, Chevrolet Performance also offers enhanced versions of the LS3 like the LS376/515 that comes with a carbureted intake manifold and the ASA Hot cam. This punches the power up to 533 hp at 6,600 while pushing 477 lb-ft of torque at 5,200.
 
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Grumpy

The Grumpy Grease Monkey mechanical engineer.
Staff member
TheNovaMan;65715634 said:
I'm rebuilding a junkyard Vortec 350. I threw away the crank position sensor reluctor wheel because it's going to be carbureted, but I didn't realize the damper seats against the reluctor, so now I need to buy or make a spacer. Does anyone know what thickness I need?

Here's what the reluctor looks like:

809-10190917.jpg

https://www.summitracing.com/parts/ati-916320
ATI Crank Hub Spacers 916320
ati-916320_ml.jpg

Image is a representation of this item.
Actual item may vary.


the reluctors .093" or about 2.38mm

Reluctor thickness is 2.38mm, if you have a non vortec balancer, you can just use it. They cut the balancer snout down to fit the reluctor.
pic-3109505960371252069-200x200.jpeg
 

Loves302Chevy

"One test is worth a thousand expert opinions."
OK, so the LS engine is 20 years old, and now retired. But I have to ask, does anyone know if
anyone has tried the FITech self-learning fuel injection system on top of the Edelbrock or Holley
carbureted LS intake manifold? That's right - NO fuel rails or injectors!
I'm still a carb guy, but if I ever decided to go fuel injected, this would be the way I would do it.
Like this:
546-30004.jpg

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Or with the dual plane intake.
510-300-129.jpg

https://www.hotrod.com/articles/20-ls1-intake-manifolds-tested/

https://racemagazine.com.au/cars/ls1-manifold-comparison-data-analysis
just so others can look over the test results, on those ls intakes

both cross sectional area, and length effect flow but remember, displacement compression and cam timing also are major factors.
what most people fail to take into account is that the cam timing and exhaust scavenging being properly matched is critical.
changing the cam timing or header configuration would change some of the resulting intake flow rankings

volumetric.gif

exhaustpressure.jpg

EXFLOWZ4.jpg



big improvement in totally different ,but bolt on, ls heads
that require a non-stock intake manifold and headers
yes you'll need non-stock valve train components
( and not direct replacement for stock heads) LS heads


 
Last edited by a moderator:

Grumpy

The Grumpy Grease Monkey mechanical engineer.
Staff member
the LS series engines were designed to be individual direct port injection, so a single plane intake with a common plenum makes sense as its more consistent and effective, at mid and upper rpms,
EXAMPLE
edls1.jpg


similar to this design
edls3.jpg
edls2.jpg

yes you can revert to either a common single plenum, or split dual plenum wet centralized EFI fogger EFI type system, and it has some minor advantages over a carburetor, but, part of the advantage of the dual plane intake design, commonly used with carburetors, is that at lower engine rpms it keeps the air speeds in the runners high enough,
to keep the fuel droplets from a carburetor in suspension from the plenum to the back of the intake valve, if you select an intake with individual injectors that are located in the lower intake manifold runners pointed to flow a fog at the back of the intake valve most of the intake plenum and runner system is flowing basically dry air and sensors maintain the correct fuel/air ratio based on what each cylinder shows.
if you revert to a single central wet fogger system, even with several individual fuel injectors supplying fuel into a common plenum you've effectively lost at least some control over the fuel distribution.
youll find that a efi throttle body controlling air flow and individual injectors with matched sensors provide the best power and lower emissions
http://www.hotrod.com/articles/giant-ls3-intake-manifold-dyno-shootout/
Dura-Bond LS Cam Bearing Sets

1999-2006 first design
position 1&5 bore 2.326 / 2.328
CH-10, CHP-10, CHP-10T

2003-2009 sec design
position 1&5 bore 2.346 / 2.348
CH-23, CHP-23, CHP-23T

2007-2013
position 1&5 bore 2.346-2.348
CH-25, CHP-25, CHP-25T

** All CH-25 sets will work in place of the CH-23 sets
 
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Loves302Chevy

"One test is worth a thousand expert opinions."
OK, so no dual plane. But I did find this on the FITech site: http://fitechefi.com/products/30002/

This method might (probably) not be as precise as separate fuel injectors in each port, but
it has to be better than a carburetor. I like K.I.S.S. and I'm just not a fan of all that plumbing and
sensors and wiring running all over the place. When I pop a hood, I like to see an air cleaner.
 

Grumpy

The Grumpy Grease Monkey mechanical engineer.
Staff member
yes it has several advantages over a carburetor,in that its rather easily installed,
and theres only a few additional supporting mandatory accessories required,
too function,and in some configs a self learning self tuning mode is the major one.
 
Last edited:

Grumpy

The Grumpy Grease Monkey mechanical engineer.
Staff member
http://dirtydingo.com/shop/pages.php?pID=8&CDpath=4

holleylspan.jpg


LS Oil Pan Information
GM LS-Series Engine Oil Pan Dimensions

F-Body Camaro/Firebird LS1 Oil Pan

Vehicles:

1998-2002 Chevrolet Camaro (5.7L V8)
2002 Pontiac Firebird (5.7L V8)

Capacity:

5.5 quarts

Oil Filter Thread:

Post June 2007 M22 x 1.5mm, Pre June 2007 13/16"-16

Baffles:



- Part Numbers -

Oil pan:

12628771

Pickup tube:

12558251

Windage tray:

12558253

Dip stick:

12551581

Dip stick tube:

12551577

Pickup tube o-ring:

12557752

Gasket:

12612350

12628771-dimensions.png


2010-2015 LS3 Camaro / G8 Oil Pan
Vehicles:

2010-Present Chevrolet Camaro SS
2008-2009 Pontiac G8
2006-Present Holden VE Commodore

Capacity:

8 quarts

Oil Filter Thread:

M22 x 1.5mm

Baffles:



- Part Numbers -

Oil pan:

12640748

Pickup tube:

12611904

Windage tray:

12611129

Dip stick:

12634547

Dip stick tube:

12625031

Pickup tube o-ring:

12557752

Gasket:

12612350

12640748-dimensions.png


GTO / VZ Commodore Oil Pan (Front Sump)
Vehicles:

2004-2006 Pontiac GTO
2001-2005 Holden Monaro (VZ)
2004-2006 Holden Commodore (VZ)
2001-2005 Vauxhall Monaro

Capacity:

6 quarts

Oil Filter Thread:

Post June 2007 M22 x 1.5mm, Pre June 2007 13/16"-16

Baffles:



- Part Numbers -

Oil pan:

12581209 up to 2004; 12599397 2005 and later. Only difference between part numbers is the newer model has a built-in pressure relief valve.

Pickup tube:

12572654

Windage tray:

12558189

Dip stick:

92067147

Dip stick tube:

92066941

Pickup tube o-ring:

12557752

Gasket:

12612350

12581209-dimensions.jpg


C6 Corvette LS2/LS3 Oil Pan (Wet Sump)
Vehicles:

2005-Present Chevrolet Corvette (non-dry sump)

Capacity:

5.5 quarts

Oil Filter Thread:

Post June 2007 M22 x 1.5mm, Pre June 2007 13/16"-16

Baffles:



- Part Numbers -

Oil pan:

12624617

Pickup tube:

12624497

Windage tray:

12558189

Dip stick:

12570788

Dip stick tube:

12570787

Pickup tube o-ring:

12557752

Gasket:

12612350

12624617-dimensions.png


2009-Present Cadillac CTS-V Oil Pan LS2/ LS6 / LSA
Vehicles:

2009 Cadillac CTS-V

Capacity:

6 quarts

Oil Filter Thread:

M22 x 1.5mm

Baffles:

Factory only



- Part Numbers -

Oil pan:

12631828 (current), 12605814 (previous), 12628451 (previous)

Pickup tube:

12621299

Windage tray:

12611129

Dip stick:

12584737

Dip stick tube:

12584738

Pickup tube o-ring:

12557752

Gasket:

12612350

12631828-dimensions.png


GM Truck / SUV Oil Pan
Vehicles:

2007-Present Cadillac Escalade
2007-Present Chevrolet Avalanche
2008-Present Chevrolet Express
2007-Present Chevrolet Silverado
2007-Present Chevrolet Suburban
2007-Present Chevrolet Tahoe

Capacity:

6 quarts

Oil Filter Thread:

M22 x 1.5mm

Baffles:

Factory only



- Part Numbers -

Oil pan:

12640746

Pickup tube:

12608579

Windage tray:

12611129

Dip stick:

12622055

Dip stick tube:

12609269

Pickup tube o-ring:

12557752

Gasket:

12612350

12640746-dimensions.png


Hummer (GM Muscle Hot Rod Pan) Oil Pan (Wet Sump)
Vehicles-

H3 Hummer

Capacity:

5.5 quarts

Oil Filter Thread:

Post June 2007 M22 x 1.5mm, Pre June 2007 13/16"-16

Baffles:



- Part Numbers -

Oil pan:

12614821

Pickup tube:

12608593

Windage tray:

12612728

Dip stick:

12603506

Dip stick tube:

12612015

Pickup tube o-ring:

12557752

Gasket:

12612350

GM-Hot-Rod.jpg

Holley 302-1 LS Retro-Fit Oil Pan

Vehicles: Various GM muscle/classic car and truck chassis

Capacity: 6 quarts

Oil Filter Thread: M22 x 1.5mm

Baffles: Holley, Part No. 302-10



- Part Numbers -

Oil pan:

Holley Part No. 302-1

Pickup tube: Supplied with pan

Windage tray: 12611129

Dip stick: 12634547

Dip stick tube: 12625031

Pickup tube o-ring: 12557752

Gasket: 12612350
302-1-dimensions.png


Holley 302-2 Front Clearance LS Retro Fit Oil Pan
Vehicles:

Various GM muscle/classic car and truck chassis

Capacity:

6.2 quarts

Oil Filter Thread:

M22 x 1.5mm

Baffles:

.

- Part Numbers -

Oil pan:

Holley Part No. 302-2

Pickup tube:

Supplied with pan

Windage tray:

12558253

Dip stick:

12634547

Dip stick tube:

12625031

Pickup tube o-ring:

12557752

Gasket:

12612350



302-2.jpg



Holley.jpg


Holley 302-3 Front Clearance LS Retro Fit Oil Pan with Turbo Drains
Vehicles:

Various GM muscle/classic car and truck chassis

Capacity:

5.9 quarts

Oil Filter Thread:

M22 x 1.5mm

Baffles:

.

- Part Numbers -

Oil pan:

Holley Part No. 302-3

Pickup tube:

Supplied with pan

Windage tray:

12558253

Dip stick:

12634547

Dip stick tube:

12625031

Pickup tube o-ring:

12557752

Gasket:

12612350

302-3-2.jpg






SSR & Trailblazer SS Oil Pan

Vehicles-

H3 Hummer

Capacity:

6 quarts

- Part Numbers -
Oil pan:

12579203

TBSS-OIL-PAN.jpg




OTHER-

Long oil filter: ACDelco PN PF59
Short oil filter: ACDelco PN PF44
Oil Drain Plug (magnetic) 23011420

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