oil system mods that help

Discussion in 'Oil and Lube Systems' started by grumpyvette, Sep 29, 2009.

  1. 87vette81big

    87vette81big Guest

    Without a Doubt in my mind the Bypass Valve is open 100% of the time in a Pontiac V8 with The stock oil pump, M54D & M54F 40-60-80psi oil pumps respective when on the gas WOT ABOVE 2600RPMS.
    SAME HILDS TRUE SBC, BBC & LS-X.

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    opening and smoothing the recessed area and porting the oil passage entrance reduces the restriction to oil flow
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    notice the open slot between the rear main cap supporting the oil pump and bearing shell support and the area supporting the rear main seal, this prevents PRESSURIZED oil from the bearings reaching the rear main seal.
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    the as cast recess in the rear main cap where the oil pump mounts can be rather restrictive and shallow, so a bit of careful mill or grinding work to open up and add some depth certainly helps oil flow if its done carefully
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    in my opinion , and experience and from lots of G.M. engine, race testing.
    theres no need for oil pressure to exceed about 65 psi,
    it takes power to spin the oil pump against that extra resistance, it induces extra wear on the distributor and cam gears,
    and it does nothing to reduce bearing wear or increase cooling on the bearing surfaces,if your engine shows more than about 70 psi, you should open some bearing clearances marginally
    (maybe an extra half thousandth on the mains) to increase oil flow volume reaching the main bearings, and use a lower resistance oil pump bye-pass spring.
    extra oil flow volume cooling the bearings and valve train will do more for durability than oil pressure exceeding 65-70 psi

    OIL PRESSURE read on the oil pressure gauge is a MEASURE of RESISTANCE to oil flow, you can REDUCE the pressure the gauge reads by either increasing the engine clearances or REDUCING the oil viscosity (thickness) so it flows thru the clearances faster with less resistance.(OR INSTALLING A SLIGHTLY WEAKER OIL PUMP BYE_PASS SPRING,that limits the pump pressure before it allows some oil to re-circulate back through the bye-pass valve ,from the high pressure back to the low pressure side of the pump impellers, but only the max pressure you reach is limited by the bye-pass spring,in your oil pressure bye pass circuit and its that spring resistance determines the point where the bye-pass circuit, opens and limits max oil pressure, but the bye-pass circuit has zero to do with anything else, if its functioning correctly,
    there are many oil leakage points(100) in a standard Chevy engine.
    16 lifter to push rod points
    16 push rod to rocker arm points
    32 lifter bores 16 x 2 ends
    10 main bearing edges
    9 cam bearing edges
    16 rod bearing edges
    2 distributor shaft leaks
    1 distributor shaft to shim above the cam gear(some engines that have an oil pressure feed distributor shaft bearing.)
    once oil exits the bearings or valve train it flows mostly by gravity back to the oil pan sump, but a properly designed windage screen and crank scraper correctly clearanced allows the spinning crank/rotating assembly to act like a directional pump that drags the vast majority of the oil flow back to the sump, by design.

    NO THE OIL PUMP, PUSHES OIL INTO THE BLOCK PASSAGES, THROUGH THE OIL FILTER ADAPTER ,THE BYE-PASS IS A SPRING LOADED BYE-PASS IN THE BLOCK THE OIL FILTER SCREWS ONTO, AND HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH OIL BYE-PASSING THE OIL FILTER
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    IF YOU DON,T WANT OIL TO OCCASIONALLY BYE-PASS THE FILTER INSTALL AN ADAPTER WITHOUT A BYE-PASS VALVE
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    ALL THAT OIL FILTER BYE-PASS VALVE DOES IS ROUTE OIL FLOW PAST THE OIL FILTER
    IF IT BECOMES SO CLOGGED WITH TRASH THAT THERES
    A 10 PSI DIFFERENCE IN THE RESISTANCE TO OIL FLOW THROUGH THE FILTER
    VS AROUND IT INTO THE BLOCKS OIL PASSAGES, oil enters the area over the oil filter in the block and is forced into the outer holes in the oil filter perimeter down through the case and filter element and up through the central hollow screw retention stud into the blocks oil passages, if the resistance too flow is too great the oil filter bye-pass valve routes oil around the filter directly from oil pump to the blocks oil passages.
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    http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...-friction-and-pumping-losses.8966/#post-31978

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    THE OIL FILTER BYE-PASS MEARLY ALLOWS OIL TO BYE-PASS THE FILTER MEDIUM IF ITS MOSTLY CLOGGED OR OVERLY RESTRICTED
    THIS HAPPENS MOSTLY IF YOU FAIL TO HAVE REGULAR OIL CHANGES OR REVE THE ENGINE WHILE THE OILS STILL COOL.
    OIL THATS HOT HAS REDUCED VISCOSITY AND ITS EASIER TO PUSH THROUGH THE OIL FILTER
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    oil pumps have a pressure regulator circuit that prevents pressure increases past a springs resistance
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    Ive seen this frequently, and almost always its a case where if you measure carefully, youll almost surely find,
    the oil pump drive shaft is bottoming out solidly between the oil pump and the distributor gear is binding,
    so the distributor is not firmly seated against the intake manifold surface.
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    the oil pump drive shaft length MUST BE about .050 SHORTER than the distance it would take to firmly seat it inside the distributor drive gear, the cam has a gear that spins the distributor and the oil pump drive shaft is driven by that distributor gear in the lower distributor that extends down to the oil pump drive.


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    this gear must not bind on the distributor too oil pump drive shaft when the distributor is seated firmly on the intake manifold and clamped into place there must be about .050 clearance minimum
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    related threads you should really read

    http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/oil-pump-drive-shafts.123/

    http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...ibutors-wont-seat-on-intake.12538/#post-63636

    http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/oil-pump-drive-shafts.123/#post-19025

    http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...ing-an-oil-pump-pick-up-tube.1800/#post-43110

    http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/distributor-gear-wear.1701/#post-4160

    http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...butor-clamp-that-just-won-t-clamp-firmly.871/

    http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...-allows-the-distrib-to-turn-even-tighten.873/

    http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/setting-timing-question.1411/#post-3131
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 9, 2018
  2. Strictly Attitude

    Strictly Attitude solid fixture here in the forum

  3. Grumpy

    Grumpy The Grumpy Grease Monkey mechanical engineer. Staff Member

    http://www.superchevy.com/how-to/engines-drivetrain/83818-block-plug-basics/

    http://www.chevyhardcore.com/tech-s...g-101-getting-started-with-your-engine-build/

    Plugged In And Ready
    Block Plug Basics
    Bob Mehlhoff Mar 1, 2002
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    This kit for a 350ci small-block contained: eight 1-5/8-inch freeze plugs, three 1/2-inch expansion plugs (oil galley), one 23/32-inch expansion plug (cam plug), and five 1/4-inch NPT pipe plugs (oil galley).

    [​IMG]4/12
    At the front of this small-block are three 1/2-inch pipe plugs. Many engine-builders will tap and install 1/4-inch NPT pipe plugs in these three holes for sealing security. If these holes are tapped, it’s important to check for proper thread engagement.
    heres a nice additional mod to increase the oil too the timing chain area
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    Top Searches
    • [​IMG]5/12
      For proper block-cleaning, every plug should be removed. For stubborn plugs, heat the plug (not the block) with a torch until it’s cherry red. Then with the torch removed, allow the plug to slightly cool down and squirt engine oil around it. The oil will penetrate the threads, allowing the plug to be removed easily. To install the new one, remember to add liquid thread sealant. Teflon tape should not be used because it can sometimes work loose and travel into the engine’s oil passages.

      [​IMG]6/12
      Did you know a 1/2-inch expansion plug is installed under the rear main cap?

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      Most small-blocks feature four 3/8-inch threaded holes (two per side) at the front of the block. The upper hole adjacent to the fuel pump passes into the crankcase area and if left open will allow oil to leak out from the block. Be certain to plug this hole only with a short 3/8-inch bolt (1/2-inch long). Because this hole aligns perfectly with the fuel pump’s pushrod, a longer bolt will contact and seize the pushrod during engine operation.

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      Freeze plugs are easily installed with a large hammer and the proper-size socket. In this case a 1-inch socket is used. Most freeze plug kits are available in brass or steel. Brass may cost more, but they don’t rust so they live longer. Remember to add sealant around the contact area. If you’re building a 400ci small-block, remember that many used two more freeze plugs (one extra per side) than other small-blocks.

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      Most factory plugs used a 1/4-inch square drive plug. Replacement plugs generally are 1/4-inch hex (left).

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      At the rear of this small-block Chevy, there are two freeze plugs, a camshaft plug, and three oil galley plugs.

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      For additional timing chain lubrication, some engine-builders drill one oil galley plug (0.030-0.035-inch) at the front of the block. This allows oil to spray onto the timing chain during engine operation.

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      After frequent rebuilds, the dowel pins may become worn and need to be replaced. On each cylinder bank, two dowel pins are press-fit into the deck surface and are used to locate each head.

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      At the rear of the block, two guide pins locate the bellhousing into position.



      At the beginning of any complete engine buildup, the block needs to be cleaned. Serious engine-builders know that hot tanking, block machining, and a host of other engine-building tasks all require the block to be stripped first. To do that all of the block’s plugs must be removed (even with a new engine) to allow cleaning access to areas that allow oil or coolant to flow. But did you know that the typical Chevrolet V-8 contains not only a set of expansion plugs, but also a variety of other plugs in some hidden areas? Leave one of these small plugs out or install one improperly, and your new engine could fail during the first few minutes of break-in. To make sure that doesn’t happen, we’ve compiled some information showing just what to look for during your next block-rebuilding excursion.

      The typical block-plug kit found in most auto parts stores is not complete for a thorough rebuild. It’s usually missing several ½-inch expansion plugs and ¼-inch NPT pipe plugs. Sometimes two kits will be sufficient to replace all the plugs in your block. Remember also that many 400 small-blocks had one additional freeze plug on each side, totaling 10 for the entire engine instead of 8.
     
    Last edited: Jul 6, 2018
  4. Speedlink1973

    Speedlink1973 Well-Known Member

    I really liked this mod.
    I tweaked it a bit for my application .
    Being I'm running a timing belt drive system and wanted to get oil to front thrust bearing,
    having access to a EDM drill
    I drilled a .030 hole at about 60degs
    As shown,
    I used a piece .05mm pencil lead
    To line it up
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    Attached Files:

    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 13, 2018
  5. Maniacmechanic1

    Maniacmechanic1 solid fixture here in the forum

    Nice. Never seen the Chevy Timing chain Oil Spray mod done like that.
     
  6. Speedlink1973

    Speedlink1973 Well-Known Member

    I was a bit concerned about that front thrust bearing not getting much oil because it's trapped in the housing.
    Hopefully it works.

    Thanks
     

    Attached Files:

  7. Grumpy

    Grumpy The Grumpy Grease Monkey mechanical engineer. Staff Member

    notice the open slot between the rear main cap supporting the oil pump and bearing shell support and the area supporting the rear main seal, this prevents PRESSURIZED oil from the bearings reaching the rear main seal.
    [​IMG]
    the as cast recess in the rear main cap where the oil pump mounts can be rather restrictive and shallow, so a bit of careful mill or grinding work to open up and add some depth certainly helps oil flow if its done carefully
    [​IMG]

    failure to use the correct oil pump,mounting stud, bolt or nut or carefully check clearances when mounting an oil pump can cause problems
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    ONE RATHER COMMON MISTAKE IS USING THE WRONG OIL PUMP STUD OR BOLT TO MOUNT THE OIL PUMP AS IF EITHER EXTENDS THRU THE REAR MAIN CAP IT CAN AND WILL BIND ON THE BEARING AND LOCK OR RESTRICT, SMOOTH ROTATION
    [​IMG]

    http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...-bearing-trashed-in-1-2-hour.5141/#post-71921

    A simple modification to the upper thrust bearing may be beneficial in some engines. Install the upper thrust bearing in the block to determine which thrust face is toward the rear of the engine. Using a small, fine tooth, flat file, increase the amount of chamfer to approximately .040" (1 mm) on the inside diameter edge of the bearing parting line. Carefully file at the centrally located oil groove and stroke the file at an angle toward the rear thrust face only, as shown in the illustration below. It is very important not to contact the bearing surface with the end of the file. The resulting enlarged ID chamfer will allow pressurized engine oil from the pre-existing groove to reach the loaded thrust face. This additional source of oiling will reach the loaded thrust face without passing through the bearing clearance first (direct oiling). Since there may be a load against the rear thrust face, oil flow should be restricted by that load and there should not be a noticeable loss of oil pressure. This modification is not a guaranteed "cure-all". However, the modification should help if all other conditions, such as surface finish, alignment, cleanliness and loading are within required limits.
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  8. Speedlink1973

    Speedlink1973 Well-Known Member

    Hi GRUMPY!!,
    glad you posted this, i was look for the bearing file mod .
    Is it A or B I will be filing on the top bearing?
    It appears to be what is facing rear of crank drivers side top bearing

    if you just assume that the machine shop must have cleaned the parts they worked on carefully...
    [​IMG]

    threads related to cleaning parts and prep.

    http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...an-aluminum-intake-manifold.14410/#post-74196

    http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/block-prep.125/

    http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/parts-prep-cleaning.6255/#post-76350

    http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...cking-blocks-heads-for-cracks.3363/#post-8862

    http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...nt-moore-tools-related-info.12148/#post-74995

    http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...n-buying-used-engine-blocks.14305/#post-73107

    http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/precision-measuring-tools.1390/#post-68861

    http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/finding-a-machine-shop.321/#post-59253

    http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...engine-stand-mods-accesories.3724/#post-26986
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 6, 2018
  9. Grumpy

    Grumpy The Grumpy Grease Monkey mechanical engineer. Staff Member

    your trying to provide a bit of extra oil flow volume too the rear facing surface of the thrust bearing
     
    Speedlink1973 likes this.
  10. Maniacmechanic1

    Maniacmechanic1 solid fixture here in the forum

    The Upper main thrust bearing you Mod.
     
    Speedlink1973 likes this.
  11. Grumpy

    Grumpy The Grumpy Grease Monkey mechanical engineer. Staff Member

    if youve ever seen an engine puke a connecting rod at 6000 rpm plus,
    you know the vast majority of the full 5-8 quart oil pan capacity can be almost instantly,
    thrown under the car, this alone generally can cause the car to loose control even if the driver keeps his cool, during a cataclysmic,
    engine failure, so having a lakewood or similar blow proof sfi rated scatter shield,
    bell housing and a engine diaper are required in many of the faster racing classes


    for those without access to the current/2019 NHRA Rule Book

    GENERAL REGULATIONS

    1:8 LOWER ENGINE CONTAINMENT DEVICE
    In classes where specified, must utilize an NHRA-accepted lower
    engine oil-retention device. SFI Spec 7.1 or 7.2 Lower Engine
    Containment Device permitted. A properly fitting lower engine
    ballistic/restraint device mandatory. The NHRA Technical staff
    can accept or reject any device. Any device that fails to perform
    as required must be replaced or repaired to the satisfaction of
    the Technical staff prior to any further runs. When used, an SFI
    Spec 7.1 or 7.2 Lower Engine Containment Device must cover
    the sides of the block and pan up to within one inch of the head
    mating surface and extend to within 1 1/2 inches of the front
    and rear of the cylinder case area. SFI Spec 7.1 devices must
    be updated/recertified by the original manufacturer at one-year
    intervals.

    In classes where specified, a belly pan may be used in
    lieu of a device attached to the engine. The belly pan must extend
    from frame rail to frame rail and extend forward of the harmonic
    General Regulations Section 21, page 9
    General Regulations balancer and to the rear of the engine block and must incorporate a minimum 2-inch-high lip on all sides unless specified in Class
    Requirements. Minimum number of slots or holes in the walls to
    clear frame, steering, or lines permitted. A nonflammable, oil absorbent
    liner mandatory inside of retention device.
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    https://www.summitracing.com/search?keyword=diaper
    engine diapers made from nylon are a waste as header heat rapidly melts holes, making them useless
    you want, in fact NEED a nomex and kevlar oil pan diaper to be legal in the faster classes,
    and yeah its damn expensive, but serious race cars are a bottomless money pit.
     
  12. chasracer

    chasracer Member

    We have been running various nylon diapers on our cars for years now with no problems at all with melting holes, etc. Sure a Nomex piece is nice but not something that a sportsman racer has to have. A diaper is definitely a must-do and I wouldn't make a pass now without one.
     
  13. Grumpy

    Grumpy The Grumpy Grease Monkey mechanical engineer. Staff Member

    having a larger capacity oil pan is always an advantage , simply having more oil capacity,
    tends to help stabilize and lower,lubricant temperatures
    but control of the oil is vastly more important, than capacity,alone.
    adding an auxiliary oil cooler with a powered fan and AN#8 line size can add measurable extra durability.
    theres no real advantage in use of a high volume oil pump in a nearly stock engine,
    but if youve made significant changes it can be helpful.
    If you post the info on your car make/model
    I may know where you can find a baffled high capacity oil pan at a reasonable cost.
    take the time too design or purchase and properly install,
    a quality lubrication system and your engine will last far longer under high stress conditions
    theres no real benefit too having oil pressure over about 65 PSI,
    but having a reserve of oil over the oil pump and auxiliary oil cooler,
    and long oil filter or dual oil filters has proven to add durability

    http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/remote-oil-filters.14755/#post-80757

    http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...ion-remote-filter-flow-rate.14621/#post-78252

    http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/bearings-and-oil-flow.150/

    http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...ilter-you-sellect-does-make-a-differance.117/

    http://garage.grumpysperformance.co...l-pumps-pressure-bye-pass-circuit-works.3536/

    http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/basic-info-on-your-v8-lube-system.52/

    http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?threads/whats-a-windage-tray-do.64/
     
  14. Maniacmechanic1

    Maniacmechanic1 solid fixture here in the forum

    I still like the 50mm Ammo Can Oil pan idea Grumpy.
    Going to get a 8 quart Moroso for a Pontiac V8.
    Like to have 11 quarts total.
    Just as SD421 had.
    Mystery no photos to look at of it but several reports it exists and on a few original Cars.
    Think it was the ultra rare 410 Hp rated 13.0:1 static compression version 1963 early.
    Possibly only the 9 SD421 Tempests built.
    Going to ask the Pontiac guys for photos on a closed race group.
     

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